List of London and North Western Railway ships

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Holyhead services[edit]

The London and North Western Railway operated a number of ships on Irish Sea crossings between Holyhead and Dublin, Howth or Kingstown.

Ship Launched Tonnage (GRT) Notes and references
Admiral Moorsom 1860 747 (1860–68)
794 (1868–85)
Sank in 1885 after a collision.[1]
Alexandra 1863 703 (1863–70)
828 (1870- )
Sold in 1889 to F Schultze, Rostock. Converted to a barque and renamed Elise Schultze.[1][2]
Anglesey 1888 980 [1]
Anglia 1847 473 Acquired in 1859 from the Chester and Holyhead Railway, in service until 1861. Used as a blockade runner by the Confederate States of America. Captured in 1862 by the Union and renamed Admiral Dupont.[2][3]
Anglia 1899 1,862 Hit a mine and sank, 17 November 1915.[3]
Anglia 1920 3,460 Scrapped in 1935.[1][3]
Arvonia 1920 1,842 Renamed from Cambria in 1920. Scrapped in 1925.[3][4]
Banshee 1884 1,109 (1884–94)
1,250 (1894–1906)
Scrapped in 1906.[1]
Cambria 1848 590 (1848–61)
759 (1861–84)
Acquired from the Chester and Holyhead Railway in 1859. Lengthened by 37 feet (11.28 m) in 1861. Scrapped in 1884.[1][3]
Cambria 1889 357
Cambria 1897 1,842 Requisitioned by the Royal Navy in 1914 and used as an Armed Boarding Ship. Converted to a Hospital ship in 1915. Returned to LNWR in 1918. Renamed Arvonia in 1920.[3][4]
Cambria 1920 3,445 Renamed Cambria II in 1948, scrapped in 1949.[3][5]
Cloghmore 1896 1,488 Ex Greenore, renamed in 1912.[1][2]
Connemara 1896 1,106 Collided on 3 November 1906 with SS Retriever and sank with the loss of 86 lives. Retriever also sank with the loss of eight of her nine crew.[6]
Countess of Erne 1868 825 Sold in 1889 to Bristol General Steam Navigation Company Ltd.[2] Sank in Portland Harbour in 1935.[2][7]
Curraghmore 1919 1,587 Renamed Duke of Abercorn in 1930.[1]
Dodder Carlingford Lough pleasure steamer. Sank in 1873 after a collision with Duchess of Erne. Raised in 1874 and returned to service.[1]
Duchess of Sutherland 1869 761 (1869–88)
848 (1888–1908)
Scrapped in 1908.[1]
Duke of Sutherland 1868 893 Scrapped in 1886.[2]
Earl Spencer 1874 858 (1874–84)
909 (1884–96)
Scrapped in 1896.[1]
Edith 1870 749 (1870–92)
837 (1892–1912)
Built as a paddle steamer. Collided with Duchess of Sutherland, in Holyhead harbour in September 1875 and sank. Salvaged in 1877 rebuilt as a cargo ship. Further rebuild in 1892 as a screw-propelled ship. Sold for scrap in 1912 but resold to Belgian owner. Seized by Belgian Government in 1913 on suspicion of gun running. Scrapped in 1914.[8]
Eleanor 1873 917 Ran aground on 27 January 1881 At Leestone Point, Kilkeel, Ireland.[1][9]
Eleanor 1881 854 Scrapped in 1902.[1]
Galtee More 1898 1,105 Scrapped in 1926.[1]
Greenore 1896 Renamed Cloghmore in 1912.[1]
Greenore 1912 1,488 Scrapped in 1926.[1]
Hercules 1838 300 Acquired from the Chester and Holyhead Railway in 1859.[1]
Hibernia 1847 573 Acquired from the Chester and Holyhead Railway in 1859. Sold in 1877 to the Waterford and Limerick Railway.[2][3]
Hibernia 1899 1,862 Requisitioned by the Royal Navy in 1915 as HMS Tara. Torpedoed and sunk by U-35 on 5 November 1915 in Sollum Bay, Mediterranean Sea.[3][10]
Hibernia 1920 3,467 Renamed Hibernia II in 1948, scrapped in 1949.[1][3]
Holyhead 1883 931 Collided on 31 October 1883 with Alhambra off Anglesey and sank.[11]
Irene 1885 989 [1]
Isabella 1877 842 (187-88)
899 (1888–98)
Scrapped in 1898.[1]
Lily 1880 1,035 (1880–91)
1,144 (1891- )
Sold in 1900 to Liverpool and Douglas Steamers Ltd.[1][2]
Menevia 1902 1,872 Renamed from Scotia in 1920. Sold in 1928 to the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company.[2][3]
Mersey 1869 Sold in 1897 to J J King, Garston.[1]
North Wall 1883 931 Scrapped in December 1904 at Preston.[12]
Ocean 1853 507 [1]
Olga 1887 970 [1]
Queen 1845 Acquired in 1859 from the Chester and Holyhead Railway.[1]
Rathmore 1908 1,569 Sank on 4 May 1914 after a collision, later salvaged and repaired. Renamed Lorain in 1927. Scrapped in 1932.[1][13]
Rose 1876 1,186 (1876–87)
1,269 (1887–94)
Scrapped in 1894.[1]
Rosstrevor 1895 1,094 Scrapped in 1926.[1]
Sea Nymph 1845 Acquired in 1859 from the Chester and Holyhead Railway.[1]
Severn 1869 Purchased in 1880. Sold in 1897 to T W Ward.[1]
Scotia 1847 179 Acquired in 1859 from the Chester and Holyhead Railway. In service until 1861. Used as a blockade runner by the Confederate States of America. Captured in 1862 by the Union and renamed General Banks.[2]
Scotia 1902 1,872[1] Requisitioned in 1914, returned to LNWR in 1917. Renamed Menevia in 1920.[2][3]
Scotia 1921 3,441 Bombed and sunk on 1 June 1940 at Dunkirk, over 330 lives lost.[1][2][3]
Shamrock 1876 1,186 (1876–86)
1,266 (1886–98)
Scrapped in 1898.[1][3]
Slieve Bawn 1904 1,148 Scrapped in 1935.[1]
Slieve Bloom 1908 1,166 Sank on 20 March 1918 off Anglesey after a collision with USS Stockton.[1]
Slieve Donard 1921 1,116 Scrapped in 1954.[1]
Slieve Gallion 1908 1,166 Scrapped in 1937.[1]
Slieve More 1904 1,138 Scrapped in 1932.[1]
Snowdon 1902 1,110 Scrapped in 1935.[1]
South Stack 1900 1,066 Scrapped in 1931.[1]
Stanley 1864 782 (1864–72)
792 (1872-)
Sold in 1888 to Irish National Steamboat Co Ltd.[1][2]
Telegraph 1853 848 Acquired in 1859 from the Chester and Holyhead Railway. Ran aground on 27 January 1881 at Cooley Point, Ireland. Salvaged but beyond economical repair and scrapped.[2][9]
Violet 1880 1,035 (1880–91)
1,175 (1891- )
Sold in 1902 to Liverpool and Douglas Steamers Ltd.[1][2]

Fleetwood services[edit]

The LNWR also operated a joint service with the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway from Fleetwood to Belfast and Derry.

Ship Launched Tonnage (GRT) Notes and references
Colleen Bawn 1903 1,204 Relegated to cargo service in 1914. Scrapped in 1931.[2][14]
Duke of Albany 1907 2,259 Requisitioned by the Royal Navy as HMS Duke of Albany, an Armed Boarding Vessel. Torpedoed and sunk in 1916.[14]
Duke of Argyll 1909 2,052 Sold in 1927 to Angleterre-Lorraine-Alsace and renamed Alsace. Scrapped in 1937 at Altenwerder, Germany.[14][15]
Duke of Clarence 1892 1,458 Requisitioned by the Admiralty in 1914, returned to LNWR in 1920. Scrapped in 1930.[2][14]
Duke of Connaught 1,082 Scrapped in 1893[2]
Duke of Connaught 1902 1,680 Scrapped in 1934.[14]
Duke of Cornwall 1898 1,540 Sold in 1928 to Isle of Man Steam Packet Company, renamed Rushen Castle. Scrapped in 1948.[14]
Duke of Cumberland 1909 2,052 Sold in 1927 to Angleterre-Lorraine-Alsace, renamed Picard. Sold in 1936 to A Anghelatos, Greece and renamed Heliopolis. Scrapped at Genoa, Italy in 1939.[14][16]
Duke of Lancaster 1895 1,520 Sold to Isle of Man Steam Packet Company in 1912, renamed The Ramsey. Requisitioned by the Royal Navy in 1914. Sank in August 1915 by SMS Meteor.[14][17] z
Duke of York 1894 1,473 Sold to Isle of Man Steam Packet Company in 1912 and renamed Peel Castle. Sold in 1930. Scrapped in 1939 at Dalmuir, West Dunbartonshire.[14][18]
Earl of Ulster 1878 1,107 Sold in 1894 to Harland & Wolff[2]
Iverna 1895 995 Acquired with the takeover of Drogheda Steam Packet Company in 1902. Scrapped in 1912.[2][14]
Kathleen Mavourneen 1885 988 Acquired with the takeover of Drogheda Steam Packet Company in 1902. Scrapped in 1903.[2][14]
Lune 1892 253 Used for pleasure trips to Blackpool and Morecambe. Sold to Cosens & Co in 1913, renamed Melcombe Regis. Scrapped in 1920.[14][19]
Mellifont 1903 1,204 Scrapped in 1933[14]
Norah Creina 1878 894 Acquired with the takeover of Drogheda Steam Packet Company in 1902. Scrapped in 1912.[2][14]
Prince Arthur 1864 708 Built as Sheffield for Liverpool & Dublin Steam Navigation Co Ltd. Bought in 1870 and renamed. Sold in 1877 to T Seed Ltd, Fleetwood.[2]
Prince of Wales 1886 1,429> Sold in 1896 to Spain.[2]
Princess of Wales 1870 936 Scrapped in 1896.[2]
Royal Consort 1844 522 Built in 1844 for North Lancashire Steam Navigation Company Ltd. Bought in 1870, scrapped in 1893.[2]
Thomas Dugdale 1873 1,000 Sold in 1883 to Irish National Steamship Co Ltd.[2]
Tredagh 1876 901 Acquired with the takeover of Drogheda Steam Packet Company in 1902. Scrapped in 1904.[2][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap "Chronological list of Ships operating on the Holyhead to Ireland Route.". Anglesey. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "Feeder Lines - Eastern & North Western Companies + Zeeland & Stena Lines". The Ships List. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "London & North Western Railway, Page 1: Holyhead Services". Simplon Postcards. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  4. ^ a b "SS Cambria". Roll of Honour. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  5. ^ "Launched 1920: ss CAMBRIA". Clydesite. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  6. ^ "Launched 1896: ss CONNEMARA". Clydesite. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  7. ^ "Dive Site: The Countess of Erne". Dive Site Directory. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  8. ^ "Belgian Merchant P-Z". Belgische Koopvaardij. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  9. ^ a b Patton, Brian (2007). Irish Sea Shipping. Kettering: Silver Link Publications. pp. p178–84. ISBN 978-1-85794-271-2. 
  10. ^ "Launched 1899: ss HIBERNIA". Clydesite. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  11. ^ "Launched 1883: ss HOLYHEAD". Clydesite. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  12. ^ "Launched 1883: ss NORTH WALL". Clydesite. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  13. ^ "The London & North Western Railway owned SS Rathmore at Holyhead, about 1909". National Museum of Science and Industry. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway, Page 1: West Coast Services - L&NWR Joint Services". Simplon Postcards. Retrieved 15 December 2009. 
  15. ^ "1127575". Miramar Ship Index. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Retrieved 15 December 2009. (subscription required)
  16. ^ "1127574". Miramar Ship Index. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Retrieved 15 December 2009. (subscription required)
  17. ^ "Background on HMS Ramsey". Navy News. Retrieved 17 December 2009. 
  18. ^ "1104233". Miramar Ship Index. http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz. Retrieved 15 December 2009. (subscription required)
  19. ^ "Melcombe Regis (1913-1920)". Simplon Postcards. Retrieved 15 December 2009.