List of Major League Baseball stolen base records

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Stolen bases were not officially noted in a baseball game's summary until 1886, and it was not until 1888 that it officially earned a place in the box score.[1] The modern rule for stolen bases was adopted in 1898.[1] While some sources do not include stolen base records before 1898 because they are difficult to compare to the era after 1898, as the sourcing on this list indicates, Major League Baseball continues to recognize them.[2]

Players denoted in italics are still actively contributing to the record noted.

(r) denotes a player's rookie season.

600 career stolen bases[edit]

"Sliding Billy" Hamilton held the career record at the time the stolen-base rule was modernized. In the modern era, Ty Cobb established a career mark which Lou Brock broke before going on to surpass Hamilton's career record. Rickey Henderson currently holds the career stolen base record.

Player SB[3] Teams and seasons
Rickey Henderson 1,406 1979–84, 89–93, 94–95, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–89 (New York Yankees), 1993 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1996–97, 2001 (San Diego Padres), 1997 (Anaheim Angels), 1999–2000 (New York Mets), 2000 (Seattle Mariners), 2002 (Boston Red Sox), 2003 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
Lou Brock 938 1961–64 (Chicago Cubs), 1964–79 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Billy Hamilton 912 1888–89 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–1901 (Boston Beaneaters)
Ty Cobb 892 1905–26 (Detroit Tigers), 1927–28 (Philadelphia Athletics)
Tim Raines 808 1979–90, 2001 (Montréal Expos), 1991–95 (Chicago White Sox), 1996–98 (New York Yankees), 1999 (Oakland Athletics), 2001 (Baltimore Orioles), 2002 (Florida Marlins)
Vince Coleman 752 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals), 1991–93, (New York Mets), 1994–95 (Kansas City Royals), 1995 (Seattle Mariners), 1996 (Cincinnati Reds), 1997 (Detroit Tigers)
Eddie Collins 745 1906–14, 27–30 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–26 (Chicago White Sox)
Arlie Latham 739 1880 (Buffalo Bisons), 1883–89, 96 (St. Louis Browns), 1890 (Chicago Pirates), 1890–1895 (Cincinnati Reds), 1899 (Washington Senators), 1909 (New York Giants)
Max Carey 738 1910–26 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 26–29 (Brooklyn Robins)
Honus Wagner 722 1897–99 (Louisville Colonels), 1900–17 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Joe Morgan 689 1963–71, 80 (Houston Colt 45's/Astros), 1972–79 (Cincinnati Reds), 1981–82 (San Francisco Giants), 1983 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1984 (Oakland Athletics)
Willie Wilson 668 1976–90 (Kansas City Royals), 1991–92 (Oakland Athletics), 1993–94 (Chicago Cubs)
Tom Brown 657 1882 (Baltimore Orioles (AA)), 1883–84 (Columbus Colts (AA)), 1885–87 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 1887 (Indianapolis Hoosiers), 1888–89 (Boston Beaneaters), 1890–91 (Boston Reds (PL-AA)), 1892–94 (Louisville Colonels), 1895 (St. Louis Cardinals), 1895–98 (Washington Senators)
Bert Campaneris 649 1964–76 (KC-Oak Athletics), 1977–79 (Texas Rangers), 1979–81 (California Angels), 1983 (New York Yankees)
Kenny Lofton 622 1991 (Houston Astros), 1992–96, 98–2001, 07 (Cleveland Indians), 1997 (Atlanta Braves), 2002 (Chicago White Sox), 2002 (San Francisco Giants), 2003 (Chicago Cubs), 2003 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 2004 (New York Yankees), 2005 (Philadelphia Phillies), 2007 (Texas Rangers)
Otis Nixon 620 1983 (New York Yankees), 1984–87 (Cleveland Indians), 1988–90 (Montréal Expos), 1991–93, 99 (Atlanta Braves), 1994 (Boston Red Sox), 1995 (Texas Rangers), 1996–97 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1997 (Los Angeles Dodgers), 1998 (Minnesota Twins)
George Davis 616 1890–92 (Cleveland Spiders), 1893–1901, 03 (New York Giants), 1902, 1904–09 (Chicago White Sox)
Juan Pierre 611 2000–2002 (Colorado Rockies), 2003–2005, 13–present (Florida/Miami Marlins), 2006 (Chicago Cubs), 2007–2009 (Los Angeles Dodgers), 2010–2011 (Chicago White Sox), 2012 (Philadelphia Phillies)

Top 10 career stolen bases by league[edit]

American League Player SB National League Player SB
Rickey Henderson 1270[4] Lou Brock 938[5]
Ty Cobb 892[6] Billy Hamilton 782[7]
Eddie Collins 745[8] Max Carey 738[9]
Willie Wilson 660[10] Honus Wagner 722[11]
Bert Campaneris 649[12] Joe Morgan 681[13]
Luis Aparicio 506[14] Vince Coleman 660[15]
Paul Molitor 504[16] Tim Raines 635[17]
Kenny Lofton 502[18] Dummy Hoy 567[19]
Clyde Milan 495[20] Maury Wills 586[21]
Tris Speaker 432[22] Ozzie Smith 580[23]

100 stolen bases, one season[edit]

The pre-modern single-season mark for stolen bases is 138 by Hugh Nicol in 1887. In the modern era, Ty Cobb set a single-season mark of 96 stolen bases in 1915[24] that lasted until it was broken by Maury Wills with 104 in 1962. A new modern mark was set by Lou Brock with 118 in 1974, and again by Rickey Henderson with 130 in 1982. Henderson and Vince Coleman are the only players to record three 100-steal seasons in the modern era. Coleman is the only player to do it three seasons in a row, much less in the first three season of his career, as well as the only player to record 100 steals as a rookie.

Player SB[25] Team Season
Hugh Nicol 138 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1887
Rickey Henderson 130 Oakland Athletics 1982
Arlie Latham 129 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
Lou Brock 118 St. Louis Cardinals 1974
Charles Comiskey 117 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
John Montgomery Ward 111 New York Giants 1887
Billy Hamilton 111 Philadelphia Phillies 1891
Vince Coleman 110 St. Louis Cardinals 1985 (r)
Arlie Latham 109 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1888
Vince Coleman 109 St. Louis Cardinals 1987
Rickey Henderson 108 Oakland Athletics 1983
Vince Coleman 107 St. Louis Cardinals 1986
Maury Wills 104 Los Angeles Dodgers 1962
Hugh Nicol 103 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1888
Jim Fogarty 102 Philadelphia Phillies 1887
Billy Hamilton 102 Philadelphia Phillies 1890
Rickey Henderson 100 Oakland Athletics 1980

5 stolen bases, one game[edit]

Under the pre-modern rule, George Gore stole 7 bases in a game in 1881, a mark that was tied by "Sliding Billy" Hamilton in 1894. In the modern era, Eddie Collins stole 6 bases in a game on two occasions, both in September 1912, a mark that stood alone for nearly eight decades before being tied by Otis Nixon (1991), Eric Young (1996), and Carl Crawford (2009).

Player SB[26] Team Date Opponent
George Gore 7 Chicago White Stockings June 25 1881 Providence Grays
Billy Hamilton 7 Philadelphia Phillies August 31 1894 Washington Senators
Eddie Collins 6 Philadelphia Athletics September 11 1912 Detroit Tigers
Eddie Collins 6 Philadelphia Athletics September 22, 1912 St. Louis Browns
Otis Nixon 6 Atlanta Braves June 16 1991 Montréal Expos
Eric Young 6 Colorado Rockies June 30 1996 Los Angeles Dodgers
Carl Crawford 6 Tampa Bay Rays 3 May 2009 Boston Red Sox
Dan McGann 5 New York Giants 27 May 1904 Brooklyn Superbas
Clyde Milan 5 Washington Senators June 14, 1912 Cleveland Indians
Johnny Neun 5 Detroit Tigers July 9 1927 1 New York Yankees
Amos Otis 5 Kansas City Royals September 7 1971 Milwaukee Brewers
Davey Lopes 5 Los Angeles Dodgers August 24 1974 St. Louis Cardinals
Bert Campaneris 5 Oakland Athletics 24 May 1976 Minnesota Twins
Lonnie Smith 5 St. Louis Cardinals September 4 1982 San Francisco Giants
Alan Wiggins 5 San Diego Padres 17 May 1984 Montréal Expos
Tony Gwynn 5 San Diego Padres September 20 1986 Houston Astros
Rickey Henderson 5 Oakland Athletics July 29 1989 Seattle Mariners
Alex Cole 5 Cleveland Indians August 1 1990 Kansas City Royals
Alex Cole 5 Cleveland Indians 3 May 1992 California Angels
Damian Jackson 5 San Diego Padres June 28 1999 Colorado Rockies
Eric Young 5 Chicago Cubs 14 May 2000 Montréal Expos
Kenny Lofton 5 Cleveland Indians September 3, 2000 Baltimore Orioles
Scarborough Green 5 Texas Rangers September 28, 2000 Seattle Mariners
Ryan Freel 5 Cincinnati Reds July 27 2005 Los Angeles Dodgers
Willy Taveras 5 Colorado Rockies June 14 2008 Chicago White Sox
Dexter Fowler 5 Colorado Rockies April 27 2009 San Diego Padres
Jacoby Ellsbury 5 Boston Red Sox 30 May 2013 Philadelphia Phillies

35 consecutive stolen bases[edit]

Max Carey established a mark in 1922 of 31 consecutive stolen bases without being caught,[27] which stood until it was broken by Davey Lopes' streak of 38 in 1975. Lopes' mark was in turn surpassed by Vince Coleman with 50 consecutive stolen bases in 1988.

Player SB[28] Team Start Ended
Vince Coleman 50 St. Louis Cardinals September 16 1988 July 26 1989
Ichiro Suzuki 45 Seattle Mariners April 29 2006 16 May 2007
Tim Raines 40 Chicago White Sox July 23 1993 September 1 1995
Jimmy Rollins 39 Philadelphia Phillies September 1, 2007 July 26 2008
Davey Lopes 38[27][29][30] Los Angeles Dodgers June 6 1975 August 24 1975
Stan Javier 37 Oak Athletics-SF Giants May 31, 1995 June 27 1996
Tim Raines 36 Montréal Expos September 23 1983 July 6 1984
Paul Molitor 36 Toronto Blue Jays August 22, 1993 October 1, 1995
Davey Lopes 35 Oak Athletics-Chi Cubs July 11, 1983 18 May 1985
Brady Anderson 35 Baltimore Orioles 14 May 1994 July 2, 1995
Jimmy Rollins 35 Philadelphia Phillies 9 May 2001 August 25, 2001

Three or more seasons with 70 stolen bases[edit]

Under pre-modern rules, "Sliding Billy" Hamilton amassed six separate seasons of 70-plus stolen bases over his career. In the modern era, Ty Cobb established a mark of three such seasons that stood (though tied by Lou Brock and Omar Moreno) until it was broken by Tim Raines in 1984. In 1986, Raines reached six seasons of 70-plus steals, all consecutive (a record), but Rickey Henderson notched his seventh such season in 1989.

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[4] 7 1980, 82–83 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86, 88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics)
Billy Hamilton[7] 6 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–91, 94–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896 (Boston Beaneaters)
Tim Raines[17] 6 1981–86 (Montréal Expos)
Vince Coleman[15] 5 1985–88, 90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tom Brown[31] 3 1890–91 (Boston Reds (PL-AA)), 1892 (Louisville Colonels)
Harry Stovey[32] 3 1887–88 (Philadelphia Athletics (AA)), 1890 (Boston Reds (PL))
Ty Cobb[6] 3 1909, 11, 15 (Detroit Tigers)
Lou Brock[5] 3 1966, 73–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Omar Moreno[33] 3 1978–80 (Pittsburgh Pirates)

Ten or more seasons with 40 stolen bases[edit]

In 1924, Eddie Collins tied Billy Hamilton's pre-modern mark of ten seasons with 40-plus stolen bases. A year later, Max Carey also tied the record. The record was broken by Lou Brock in 1974. Brock eventually recorded a thirteenth 40-steal season, but was in turn surpassed by Rickey Henderson in 1993. Henderson eventually stole 40 bases in sixteen separate seasons.

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[4] 16 1980–84, 90–92, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Oak Athletics-Tor Blue Jays), 1997 (SD Padres-Ana Angels)
Lou Brock[5] 13 1964 (Chi Cubs-StL Cardinals), 1965–76 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tim Raines[17] 11 1981–87, 89–90 (Montréal Expos), 1991–92 (Chicago White Sox)
Billy Hamilton[7] 10 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–98 (Boston Beaneaters)
Eddie Collins[8] 10 1909–10, 12–14 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–17, 23–24 (Chicago White Sox)
Max Carey[9] 10 1912–13, 16–18, 20, 22–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)

Eight or more consecutive seasons with 40 stolen bases[edit]

Player Seasons Seasons and teams
Rickey Henderson[4] 14 1980–84, 90–92 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Oak Athletics-Tor Blue Jays)
Lou Brock[5] 13 1964 (Chi Cubs-StL Cardinals), 1965–76 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Billy Hamilton[7] 10 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–95 (Philadelphia Phillies), 1896–98 (Boston Beaneaters)
Joe Morgan[13] 9 1969–71 (Houston Astros), 1972–77 (Cincinnati Reds)
Honus Wagner[11] 8 1901–08 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Otis Nixon[34] 8 1990 (Montréal Expos), 1991–93 (Atlanta Braves), 1994 (Boston Red Sox), 1995 (Texas Rangers), 1996 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1997 (Tor Blue Jays-LA Dodgers)
Juan Pierre[35] 8 2002 (Colorado Rockies), 2003–05 (Florida Marlins), 2006 (Chicago Cubs), 2007–08 (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Fifteen or more seasons with 20 stolen bases[edit]

Player Titles[36] Years and teams
Rickey Henderson[4] 20 1979–84, 89–93, 94–95, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1993 (Toronto Blue Jays), 1996–97, 2001 (San Diego Padres), 1997 (SD Padres-Anaheim Angels), 1999 (New York Mets), 2000 (NY Mets-Sea Mariners)
Honus Wagner[11] 18 1898–99 (Louisville Colonels), 1900–15 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
George Davis[37] 17 1890–92 (Cleveland Spiders), 1893–1901 (New York Giants), 1902, 1904–06, 08 (Chicago White Sox)
Ty Cobb[6] 17 1906–19, 21, 24 (Detroit Tigers), 1927 (Philadelphia Athletics)
Lou Brock[5] 16 1963 (Chicago Cubs), 1964 (Chi Cubs-Stl Cardinals), 1965–77, 79 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Ozzie Smith[23] 16 1978–81 (San Diego Padres), 1982–93 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Eddie Collins[8] 15 1909–14 (Philadelphia Athletics), 1915–20, 22–24 (Chicago White Sox)
Max Carey[9] 15 1911–18, 20–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates), 1927 (Brooklyn Robins)
Willie Wilson[10] 15 1978–90 (Kansas City Royals), 1991–92 (Oakland Athletics)

League leader in stolen bases, 5 or more seasons[edit]

Player Titles[38] Years and teams
Rickey Henderson 12 1980–84, 90–91, 98 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86, 88 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics)
Max Carey 10 1913, 15–18, 20, 22–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Luis Aparicio 9 1956–62 (Chicago White Sox), 1963–64 (Baltimore Orioles)
Lou Brock 8 1966–69, 71–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Ty Cobb 6 1907, 09, 11, 15–17 (Detroit Tigers)
George Case 6 1939–43, 46 (Washington Senators)
Maury Wills 6 1960–65 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
Bert Campaneris 6 1965–68, 70, 72 (Oakland Athletics)
Vince Coleman 6 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Billy Hamilton 5 1889 (Kansas City Blues (AA)), 1890–91, 94–95 (Philadelphia Phillies)
Honus Wagner 5 1901–02, 04, 07–08 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Kenny Lofton 5 1992–96 (Cleveland Indians)

League leader in stolen bases, 4 or more consecutive seasons[edit]

Player Titles[38] Years and teams
Luis Aparicio 9 1956–62 (Chicago White Sox), 1963–64 (Baltimore Orioles)
Rickey Henderson 7 1980–84 (Oakland Athletics), 1985–86 (New York Yankees)
Maury Wills 6 1960–65 (Los Angeles Dodgers)
Vince Coleman 6 1985–90 (St. Louis Cardinals)
George Case 5 1939–43 (Washington Senators)
Kenny Lofton 5 1992–96 (Cleveland Indians)
Bob Bescher 4 1909–12 (Cincinnati Reds)
Max Carey 4 1915–18 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Max Carey 4 1922–25 (Pittsburgh Pirates)
Willie Mays 4 1956–59 (San Francisco Giants)
Bert Campaneris 4 1965–68 (KC-Oak Athletics)
Lou Brock 4 1966–69 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Lou Brock 4 1971–74 (St. Louis Cardinals)
Tim Raines 4 1981–84 (Montréal Expos)
Rickey Henderson 4 1988 (New York Yankees), 1989 (NY Yankees-Oak Athletics), 1990–91 (Oakland Athletics)

League leader in stolen bases, two leagues[edit]

Player League, team and year[38]
Harry Stovey AA: Philadelphia Athletics (1886), PL: Boston Reds (1890)
Tom Brown AA: Boston Reds (1891), NL: Louisville Colonels (1893)
Billy Hamilton AA: Kansas City Blues (AA) (1889), NL: Philadelphia Phillies (1890–91, 94–95)
Ron LeFlore AL: Detroit Tigers (1978), NL: Montréal Expos (1980)
Juan Pierre NL: Colorado Rockies (2001), Florida Marlins (2003), AL: Chicago White Sox (2010)

League leader in stolen bases, three different teams[edit]

Player Teams and year[38]
Juan Pierre Colorado Rockies (2001), Florida Marlins (2003), Chicago White Sox (2010)

Eighty percent stolen base percentage, career[edit]

Those marked in bold have at least 600 career stolen base attempts. Of those, Joe Morgan was the first to retire with a career stolen base percentage of at least 80%. His mark was successively surpassed by Davey Lopes, Willie Wilson, and Tim Raines.

Player SB Attempts SB%[39]
Chase Utley 127 143 88.8%
Carlos Beltrán 289 328 88.1%
Tim Raines 808 954 84.7%
Eric Davis 349 415 84.1%
Willie Wilson 668 802 83.3%
Barry Larkin 379 456 83.11%
Tony Womack 363 437 83.07%
Jimmy Rollins 343 413 83.05%
Davey Lopes 557 671 83.01%
Carl Crawford 409 499 82.0%
Julio Cruz 343 421 81.5%
Ichiro Suzuki 383 471 81.3%
Joe Morgan 689 851 80.96%
Vince Coleman 752 929 80.95%
Rickey Henderson 1406 1741 80.8%
Alex Rodriguez 301 373 80.7%
Roberto Alomar 474 588 80.6%

Ninety-five percent stolen base percentage, season, 30+ stolen bases[edit]

see notes2 3

Player SB%[40] SB Attempts Team Season
Brady Anderson 96.9% 31 32 Baltimore Orioles 1994
Carlos Beltrán 96.9% 31 32 Kansas City Royals 2001
Max Carey 96.2% 51 53 Pittsburgh Pirates 1922
Ichiro Suzuki 95.74% 45 47 Seattle Mariners 2006

350 stolen bases by a team in one season[edit]

SB[41] Team Season
581 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1887
527 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1887
469 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1888
468 St. Louis Cardinals (AA) 1888
462 Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA) 1889
415 New York Giants 1887
409 Brooklyn Grays (AA) 1887
409 Brooklyn Grooms 1892
389 Brooklyn Bridegrooms (AA) 1889
382 Chicago White Stockings 1887
373 Boston Beaneaters 1887
355 Philadelphia Phillies 1887
350 Cincinnati Reds 1896

290 stolen bases by a team in one season, 1901 or later[edit]

SB[41] Team Season
347 New York Giants 1911
341 Oakland Athletics 1976
319 New York Giants 1912
314 St. Louis Cardinals 1985
310 Cincinnati Reds 1910
296 New York Giants 1913
291 New York Giants 1905
290 Cincinnati Reds 1911

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Game 2 of a doubleheader.
  2. Minimum 20 stolen base attempts.
  3. The Major League Baseball (MLB) reference for this statistic lists Carlos Beltrán as having a 100% stolen base percentage in 2004. However, examination of the statistics shows that Beltrán was 28/28 in stolen bases with the Houston Astros, but went 14/17 after being traded from the Kansas City Royals mid-season.[42] While 28/28 is the National League leader for that season, the combined 42/45 (93.3%) does not make Beltrán eligible for this list. Similarly, Dave Roberts is listed by MLB as having a 97.1% stolen base percentage in 2004. Roberts was 33/34 in stolen bases with the Los Angeles Dodgers before being traded mid-season to the Boston Red Sox where he was 5/7 in stolen bases.[43] Roberts' combined 38/41 (92.7%) does not make him eligible for this list.

References[edit]

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  8. ^ a b c "Eddie Collins". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010. 
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  22. ^ "Tris Speaker". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010. 
  23. ^ a b "Ozzie Smith". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010. 
  24. ^ http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/SB_season.shtml
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  29. ^ The Fans Speak Out, Baseball Digest, December 1989, p.12, accessed November 23, 2010.
  30. ^ John R. Finger, Phillies Hope to Get Running Game Going, CSNPhilly.com, May 13, 2009, accessed November 23, 2010.
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  33. ^ "Omar Moreno". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010. 
  34. ^ "Otis Nixon". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010. 
  35. ^ "Juan Pierre". statistical listing. Major League Baseball. October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2010. 
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  43. ^ "Dave Roberts". statistical list. Major League Baseball. October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.