List of Maryland hurricanes (1980–present)

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Hurricane Isabel, one of the most significant storms to affect the region, on September 18, 2003

Since 1980, 56 known hurricanes, tropical storms and tropical depressions have affected the U.S. state of Maryland. Many of these storms also affect the country's capital, Washington, D.C., since the city is located on territory ceded by Maryland. Hurricanes are the most intense classification of these storms, while tropical storms and tropical depressions are generally weaker. The Delmarva Peninsula is often affected by cyclones that brush the East Coast.[1] Central and Western Maryland, as well as Washington, D.C., commonly receive rainfall from the remnants of storms that make landfall elsewhere and track northward.[2] On rare occasions, the area experiences the effects of Pacific storms; one such example of this is Hurricane Tico, which made landfall on Mexico and moved inland. Four tropical cyclones in the state have caused five known deaths.

Hurricane Sandy was the deadliest storm, killing 11 people. The most damaging storm was Hurricane Irene, which resulted in $151 million in damage. The only storms to have caused hurricane force winds were Hurricane Irene of 2011, which caused hurricane force gusts along the beaches, and Hurricane Sandy of 2012, which caused hurricane force gusts as far inland as Gaithersburg, Maryland. There have been examples of a couple other storms which gusted to hurricane force, such as Hurricane Isabel of 2003.

1980–1989[edit]

  • June 7, 1981 – A tropical depression moves off the Mid-Atlantic coast, brushing the southern tip of Maryland with light rainfall.[3]
  • July 1, 1981 – Tropical Storm Bret makes landfall on Maryland, although there is no reported damage.[1]
  • August 19, 1981 – Tropical Storm Dennis brushes the extreme southern section of the Delmarva Peninsula, with light rainfall.[4]
  • September 30, 1983 – Tropical Storm Dean makes landfall on Virginia and produces up to 1.32 in (34 mm) of rainfall in the state.[2]
  • October 25, 1983 – The remnants of Hurricane Tico, a Pacific storm, drop light rainfall across Maryland and surrounding locations.[5]
Hurricane Gloria moving away from the Maryland coast on September 27
  • July 25, 1985 – The remnants of Hurricane Bob cause moderate rainfall in southern Maryland, and light wind gusts.[2] Rough seas from the system capsize a few boats along the Potomac River, and the rainfall collapses a house under construction in Great Falls, Maryland.[6]
  • August 18, 1985 – Remnant moisture from Hurricane Danny drops up to 7 in (180 mm) of rain on the Delmarva Peninsula, although damage, if any is unknown.[7]
  • September 24, 1985 – Tropical Storm Henri parallels the coastline, dropping light rainfall.[2]
  • September 27, 1985 – Hurricane Gloria passes east of Maryland and drops over 7 in (180 mm) of rain. Wind gusts to 40 mph (64 km/h) blast the coastline, causing beach erosion.[8]
  • August 18, 1986 – Hurricane Charley tracks just miles offshore, spawning wind gusts up to 35 mph (56 km/h).[9] The storm also drops up to 4.50 in (114 mm) of rain in Maryland.[2]
  • September, 1987 – Tropical Depression Nine produces up to 5 in (130 mm) of rainfall throughout the area.[10]
  • August 28, 1988 – The state receives light rainfall caused by Tropical Storm Chris.[2]
  • Mid-October, 1989 – The remnants of Hurricane Jerry track eastward off the Mid-Atlantic coast, dropping light amounts of rainfall in northern locales.[2]

1990–1994[edit]

  • Mid-October, 1990 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Marco produce moderate rainfall in western locations.[11]
  • August 19, 1991 – Hurricane Bob passes 90 mi (140 km) offshore, producing waves of up to 12 ft (3.7 m) high.[12]
  • Late August, 1992 – Remnant moisture from Hurricane Andrew produces up to 2.70 in (69 mm) of rain in western areas of the state.[2]
Radar image of Tropical Storm Danielle making landfall
  • September 25, 1992 – Tropical Storm Danielle makes landfall on the Delmarva Peninsula, producing winds of 53 mph (85 km/h) in Ocean City. Storm tide ranges from an estimated storm tide of 2–3 feet (0.6–0.9 m).[13] The storm produces moderate rainfall of over 3 inches (76 mm) across the Eastern Shore of Maryland.[14]
  • September 1, 1993 – Uncertainty in the track of Hurricane Emily track prompts voluntary evacuations of Ocean City, although the storm quickly turns away from the state.[15]
  • July 21, 1994 – Tropical Depression Two passes just west of the western border with light precipitation.[16]
  • August 18, 1994 – Tropical Storm Beryl's remnants track over western Maryland, producing light rainfall.[17]
  • November 20, 1994 – Hurricane Gordon dissipates over South Carolina, dropping light to moderate rainfall over the southern Delmarva Peninsula.[18]

1995–1999[edit]

  • June 6, 1995 – The remnants of Hurricane Allison produce light showers in some locations, amounting to less than an inch.[2]
  • August 6, 1995 – Remnant moisture from Hurricane Erin produces 4.53 in (115 mm) of rainfall in Chestertown.[2]
  • October 3, 1995 – The remnants of Hurricane Opal track well west of Maryland, producing light rainfall across the entire state.[2] Moderate winds downed trees and tree limbs onto Maryland Route 495.[19] The system spawns numerous tornadoes, the most notable of which contains winds of 150 mph (240 km/h); this particular tornado results in three injuries and damages over 100 homes.[20]
Hurricane Fran affecting Maryland while making landfall
  • July 13, 1996 – Tropical Storm Bertha passes over the state producing wind gusts peaking at 63 mph (101 km/h) at Ocean City. Several trees and power lines are downed resulting in scattered power outages and property damage. In Dorchester, one tornado is confirmed. Also, rainfall of up to 5 in (130 mm) causes some street flooding.[21]
  • September 6, 1996 – Tropical Storm Fran tracks west of the state, spawning wind gusts of up to 55 mph (89 km/h) which, combined with saturated soil, downs numerous trees.[22] Along the Chesapeake Bay, a storm surge of up to 6 ft (1.8 m) inundates coastal communities.[23] This causes tidal flooding which results in one injury and forces several people to evacuate.[24] The heavy rainfall severely floods the Potomac River, damaging over 500 homes and destroying nearly 450 acres (1.8 km2) of corn and soy crops.[25] As a result of Fran, one death is reported,[26] and $50 million (1996 USD, $68 million 2008 USD) in damage is blamed on the storm.[27]
  • October 8, 1996 – Moisture from Tropical Storm Josephine moves northward along the East Coast. Up to 3.5 in (89 mm) of rainfall is reported, resulting in the flooding of numerous roads. The Coast Guard station in Ocean City records a wind gust of 77 mph (124 km/h) which results in several downed trees and power lines. The winds break lose a 160 ft (49 m) barge from its moorings.[28]
  • July 24, 1997 – Tropical Storm Danny passes south of the state, dropping up to 5 in (130 mm) in southernmost locations.[29] Because of a previous drought, there are no reports of flooding except for minor drainage ditch overflows.[30]
  • August 5, 1998 – The remnants of Hurricane Earl track south of the state, producing light rainfall on the Delmarva Peninsula.[2]
  • August 28, 1998 – Assateague Island reports 2.37 in (60 mm) of rainfall from Hurricane Bonnie which tracks offshore in the Atlantic.[2]
  • September 4, 1999 – The remnants of Hurricane Dennis drop heavy rainfall which surpasses 4 in (100 mm) and flooding.[2] On the coast of Maryland, tides were up to 3 ft (0.91 m) above average.[31] In Havre de Grace, four people were seriously injured when a car crossed the median and slammed into an oncoming vehicle, which is blamed on heavy rainfall.[32] Two or more lightning strikes leave over 6,700 people without power.[31]
Rainfall from Hurricane Floyd affecting the state
  • September 15, 1999 – Hurricane Floyd parallels the shore of the Delmarva Peninsula as a tropical storm. Chestertown, reports a maximum rainfall total of 14 inches (350 mm), with other locales reporting similar values.[33] Extreme river flooding causes moderate damage to bridges and roads, resulting in a damage toll of $7.9 million (1999 USD, $10 million 2008 USD) throughout the state.[34] In addition, over 250,000 residents are without electricity because of high winds blowing down power lines.[35] More than 28 people are forced to be rescued by boat as a result of severe flooding. Nine other people were are from an apartment building near Great Mills. Two people are injured and one person is killed by carbon monoxide after losing power and running a generator inside their home. Also, a 12 year old boy is caught in flood waters and is swept a half mile (800 m) down a drainage ditch before being rescued and treated for hypothermia.[35]
  • October 17, 1999 – Showers from Hurricane Irene are reported, totaling to 1.29 in (33 mm) in some places.[2]

2000–2004[edit]

  • September 19, 2000 – The remnants of Hurricane Gordon track over the Delmarva Peninsula, producing up to 2.17 in (55 mm) of rainfall, mainly to the east of the center.[2]
  • June 16, 2001 – The weakening Tropical Storm Allison tracks northward along the U.S. East Coast, passing southeast of the state. Rainfall from Allison totaled to 7.5 inches (190 mm) in Denton, closing eleven roads and causing washouts on 41 others.[36]
  • September 11, 2002 – The pressure gradient between a strong high pressure system in the central United States and Hurricane Gustav located east of the state result in gusty winds, peaking at 44 mph (71 km/h) at Tolchester Beach. The winds damage tree limbs and caused power outages to 3,000 customers, although it was quickly restored.[37]
  • September 27, 2002 – As the remnants of Hurricane Isidore track northward through the Ohio Valley, it produces light to moderate showers in northern and central Maryland.[2]
  • October 11, 2002—Remnant moisture from Hurricane Kyle produces moderate rainfall, reaching 4.03 in (102 mm) in Salisbury.[2]
Storm surge flooding caused by Isabel in Bowleys Quarters, Maryland
  • July 3, 2003 – Rainfall peaking at 4 in (100 mm) falls in association with the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill.[38] In northern and central Dorchester County, several secondary roads are closed due to heavy rainfall and flooding.[39]
  • September 4, 2003 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Grace drop up to 5 in (130 mm) of rain in western areas of the state, although there are no reports of damage.[40]
  • September 14, 2003 – The remnant moisture from Tropical Storm Henri produce light rainfall over the state.[41]
  • September 17, 2003 – Hurricane Isabel tracks south and west of the state, causing moderate to severe damage. Along the Eastern Shore, the hurricane produces a storm surge peaking at 8 feet (2.4 m) on the Chesapeake Bay side in Hoopers Island and 6.5 feet (2 m) on the Atlantic coast in Ocean City.[42] The large size of Isabel causes strong winds across the area, including maximum sustained winds of 52 mph (84 km/h) and a gust of 66 mph (106 km/h) in Cambridge.[42] Over 1.4 million people throughout the state lose electric power at some point during the storm.[43] One death in Maryland is attributed to the hurricane, and over 200 injuries are reported. In all, damage is estimated at over $530 million (2003 USD, $621 million 2008 USD).[43] Winds sensors in Washington, D.C. report winds of up to 85 mph (137 km/h), which causes $125 million (2003 USD, $146 million 2008 USD) in damage.[44]
  • August 12, 2004 – Remnant moisture from Tropical Storm Bonnie drops light rainfall across portions of the state.[2]
  • August 30, 2004 – Hurricane Gaston tracks east of the state, producing light rainfall along the eastern shore.[2]
  • September 3, 2004 – The remnants of Hurricane Frances produce over 6 in (150 mm) of rain in some locations, although there are no reports of damage.[2]
  • September 19, 2004 – The remnants of Hurricane Ivan drop up to 3.83 in (97 mm) of rainfall, particularly in western areas.[2] The system also results in several tornadoes, one of which is reported to have killed an elderly woman and her daughter when a tree fell on their home in Cecil County.[45][46]
  • September 28, 2004 – The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne spawn a waterspout which moves ashore as a tornado and damages a visitor center, tearing part of the roof off the structure and landing it on Maryland Route 2. The hurricane drops up to 4 in (100 mm) of rainfall which results in widespread minor to moderate flooding.[2] In total over 50 roads were closed due to flooding, and a group of inmates were rescued from the roof of a security van.[47]

2005–2009[edit]

  • July 8, 2005 – The extratropical remnants of Hurricane Cindy drop upwards of 7 in (180 mm) in the state,[48] and spawn one tornado.[49] which causes sporadic tree damage.[50] The rainfall causes flooding in some locations, leaving numerous roads underwater,[51] and flooding several basements.[52]
  • July 9, 2005 – The remnants of Hurricane Dennis produce widespread light rainfall across much of the state.[53]
  • October 8, 2005 – A combination of the remnants of Tropical Storm Tammy and Subtropical Depression Twenty-Two contribute to the Northeast U.S. flooding of October 2005, which produces up to 9 in (230 mm) of rainfall.[54] Dozens of roads are flooded and closed, and about 30 people are forced from their homes. Flood waters reach up to 6 ft (1.8 m) as reported by a local newspaper. Damage is estimated at $200,000 (2005 USD, $220,000 2008 USD).[55]
  • June 14, 2006—The remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto drop light rainfall in southern locations.[2]
  • September 1–2, 2006 – High winds and heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ernesto leaves 44,000 homes without electric power, mostly in low-lying areas of southern locations and on the eastern shore. Several basements in Anne Arundel County are forced to be pumped out due to flooding. It is estimated that wind gusts peaked at 50 mph (80 km/h).[56]
  • June 3, 2007 – Tropical Storm Barry produces light rainfall over eastern portions of the state, peaking at 2.30 in (58 mm) near Columbia.[2]
  • September 15, 2007 – The remnants of Hurricane Humberto drop light rainfall in extreme southern locations.[57]
  • September 6, 2008 – Tropical Storm Hanna moved over the area from the south, dropping over 4 inches of rain in parts of Maryland and producing wind gusts to 50 MPH in Southern Maryland.[58][59]

2010-present[edit]

  • September 3, 2010 – Hurricane Earl skimmed the coast of North Carolina and moved northeastward, resulting in heavy rain and tropical storm force winds in Southeastern Maryland, near Ocean City. Areas inland were not affected by Earl.
  • August 27, 2011 – Hurricane Irene did not make direct landfall, but due to the large size, hurricane conditions were felt to the east of the Chesapeake Bay and tropical storm conditions were felt as far inland as Frederick, MD. Along the Delmarva Peninsula, sustained winds of 60 mph with gusts up to 85 mph and over a foot of rain fell over the area. There was also a five-foot storm surge that inundated regions around Ocean City, MD. The beach was evacuated prior to the storm; due to the minimal damage, it reopened the next day on Sunday and residents and tourists were allowed to return.[60] In Central Maryland, sustained winds of 30-40 mph and 3-5 inches of rain fell. Gusts of up to 65 mph toppled many power lines. Most of the damage was from falling trees, which blocked roads, crushed power lines, and toppled onto houses. Power was out for over 200,000 people in Maryland; however, by Sunday, most power was restored.[61]
  • October 29, 2012 – Hurricane Sandy makes landfall north of the state. However, due to the tremendous size of the storm, its effects were felt all over Maryland. During the peak of the storm, 60 mph sustained winds were felt from Frederick, Maryland eastward. However, power outages were not widespread and any problems were solved quickly due to better preparation. Heavy rain affected the state, with up to a foot of rain falling in some spots. Storm surge was also a large factor along the beaches, washing out many piers and some boardwalks along Ocean City. Hurricane Sandy is the deadliest tropical cyclone to affect the state, causing 11 deaths.
  • June 7, 2013 - Rain bands from Tropical Storm Andrea cause minor flooding in the Baltimore-Washington area and parts of the Eastern Shore, with rainfall totals of just over two inches in Annapolis and Baltimore-Washington International Airport, both in Anne Arundel County.[62][63] Andrea is a post-tropical system by the time the center moves over St. Mary's County and the lower Eastern Shore, which was under a tornado watch at the time due to the system's history of producing tornadoes.[64]

Monthly statistics[edit]

Number of recorded storms affecting Maryland and Washington, D.C. 1980 to Present
Month Number of storms
June
6
July
8
August
13
September
22
October
8
November
1

Deadly storms[edit]

The following table includes all storms since 1980 that have caused reported fatalities in Maryland and Washington, D.C.

Total deaths
Name Year Number
of deaths
Hurricane Sandy 2012 11 (113 total) [65]
Hurricane Irene 2011 1 (40 total)
Hurricane Ivan 2004 2 (92 total)
Hurricane Isabel 2003 1 (16 total)
Hurricane Floyd 1999 1 (57 total)
Hurricane Fran 1996 1 (22 total)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tropical Prediction Center. "Best Track Analysis". Unisys Corporation. Retrieved 2008-05-08. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Roth, David M; Weather Prediction Center (2012). "Tropical Cyclone Rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic United States". Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Point Maxima. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Retrieved June 23, 2012. 
  3. ^ David Roth (2008). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Depression Two". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-19. 
  4. ^ David Roth (1981). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Dennis". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  5. ^ David Roth (1983). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Tico". Hydrometeorolgical Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  6. ^ David Roth & Hugh Cobb (2001). "Late 20th Century Virginia Hurricane History". National Weather Service. Retrieved 2006-10-30. 
  7. ^ David Roth (1985). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Danny". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  8. ^ Case (1985). "1985 Monthly Weather Review" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2006-07-27. 
  9. ^ Lawrence (1986). "1986 Monthly Weather Review" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2006-07-27. 
  10. ^ David Roth (1987). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Depression Nine". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  11. ^ Max Mayfield and Miles B. Lawrence (1992). "Atlantic Hurricane Season of 1990" (PDF). American Meteorological Society. Retrieved 2007-11-09. [dead link]
  12. ^ Mary Jordan; Dan Beyers (1991). "With a Wave, Bob Passes By; Hurricane Skirts Thankful Coast". The Washington Post. 
  13. ^ Davis (1992). "Danielle Preliminary Report". Baltimore National Weather Service. Retrieved 2006-08-02. 
  14. ^ Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (2005). "Tropical Storm Danielle Rainfall Summary". Retrieved 2006-08-05. 
  15. ^ Bill McAllister (1999-01-30). "Hurricane Climbs N.C. Coast to Virginia". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  16. ^ David Roth (1994). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Depression Two". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  17. ^ David Roth (1994). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Beryl". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  18. ^ David Roth (1994). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Gordon". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  19. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1995). "Hurricane Opal Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  20. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2) (1995). "Hurricane Opal Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  21. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Hurricane Bertha Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  22. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Hurricane Fran Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  23. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Hurricane Fran Event Report for Maryland (2)". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  24. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Hurricane Fran Event Report for Maryland (3)". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  25. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Hurricane Fran Event Report for Maryland (4)". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  26. ^ York Daily Record (1996). "Floods Ravage Maryland Homes Some Towns Had Flooding More Severe Than January Storms.". 
  27. ^ Max Mayfield (1996). "Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Fran". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  28. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1996). "Tropical Storm Josephine Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  29. ^ David Roth (1997). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Danny". Hydromteorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  30. ^ National Climatic Data Center (1997). "Hurricane Danny Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  31. ^ a b National Climatic Data Center (1999). "Hurricane Dennis Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  32. ^ David S. Fallis and Linda Perlstein (1999-09-06). "Dennis Rains More Trouble As It Fades". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  33. ^ National Hurricane Center (1999). "Preliminary Report: Hurricane Floyd". NOAA. Retrieved 2006-02-13. 
  34. ^ "Hurricane Floyd Information: Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Area". USGS. 2000. Retrieved 2006-02-14. 
  35. ^ a b National Climatic Data Center (1999). "Hurricane Floyd Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  36. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2001). "Tropical Storm Allison Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2006-05-26. 
  37. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2002). "Hurricane Gustav Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  38. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2003). "Tropical Storm Bill Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  39. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2003). "Tropical Storm Bill Event Report for Maryland (2)". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  40. ^ David Roth (2003). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Grace". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  41. ^ David Roth (2006). "Rainfall information on Tropical Storm Henri". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2006-06-12. 
  42. ^ a b Wakefield, Virginia National Weather Service (2003). "Hurricane Isabel Preliminary Storm Report". Retrieved 2006-12-27. 
  43. ^ a b National Climatic Data Center (2003). "Hurricane Isabel Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-04. 
  44. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2003). "Hurricane Isabel Event Report for Washington D.C.". Retrieved 2008-05-06. 
  45. ^ The Washington Times (2004). "Maryland women die in Ivan's wake". 
  46. ^ Lyndsey Layton and Jamie Stockwell (2004). "Tornado Damage Scattered, Severe; Residents Clean Up After Ivan Kills Two,
    Destroys Homes and Businesses in Va., Md.". The Washington Post.
     
  47. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Hurricane Jeanne Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  48. ^ David Roth (2005). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Cindy". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  49. ^ Stacy R. Stewart (2005). "Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Cindy". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  50. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Hurricane Cindy Event Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  51. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Hurricane Cindy Event Report for Maryland (2)". Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  52. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Hurricane Cindy Event Report for Maryland (3)". Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  53. ^ David Roth (2005). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Dennis". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  54. ^ Scott Stephens (200). "Hazards/Climate Extremes". NOAA/NCDC. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  55. ^ National Climatic Data Center. "Flooding Report for Maryland". Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  56. ^ Stephanie Desmon and Gadi Dechte (2006). "Ernesto's wind gusts punched away at Md.". Baltimore Sun. 
  57. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Humberto". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  58. ^ Miroff, Nick; Rucker, Phillip; Fahrenthold David A. (2008-09-07). "Heavy Rain Forces Evacuations, Causes Floods Across Area". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2009-08-19. 
  59. ^ "NWS Sterling — Tropical Storm Hanna Gusts and Rainfall". Erh.noaa.gov. Retrieved 2010-03-24. 
  60. ^ "Hurricane Irene: Ocean City, Md. Resort ‘Dodges Missile’". IB Times. 
  61. ^ "Post-Irene power, transport problems linger in MD, D.C". Reuters. 2011-08-29. 
  62. ^ http://www.wjla.com/blogs/weather/2013/06/tropical-storm-andrea-any-d-c-impact--19007.html
  63. ^ http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-06-07/news/bal-wx-tropical-storm-andrea-forecast-to-bring-heavy-rains-friday-20130606_1_chance-rain-cecil-county
  64. ^ http://www.wjla.com/blogs/weather/2013/06/tropical-storm-andrea-any-d-c-impact--19007.html
  65. ^ Serna, Joseph (2012-11-03). "Hurricane Sandy death toll climbs above 110, N.Y. hardest hit". Los Angeles Times. 

External links[edit]