List of Michigan Wolverines head football coaches

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Fielding H. Yost's "Point-a-Minute" teams compiled a record of 55–1–1 and outscored opponents 2,821 to 42 in his first five seasons (1901–1905).

The Michigan Wolverines football program is a college football team that represents the University of Michigan in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Big Ten Conference. The Wolverines have played 1,279 games during their 135 seasons, winning 915 contests for a winning percentage of .729. The mark for wins is the best in college football history.[1]

Michigan has had 19 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1879. Mike Murphy and Frank Crawford, co-head coaches for a single season in 1891, were the team's first head coaches. In his first season at Michigan in 1901, Fielding H. Yost guided the Wolverines to the 1902 Rose Bowl, the first college bowl game ever played. Since then, seven other coaches have led the Wolverines to postseason bowl games: Fritz Crisler, Bennie Oosterbaan, Bump Elliott, Bo Schembechler, Gary Moeller, Lloyd Carr, Rich Rodriguez, and Brady Hoke. Nine coaches have won at least one of Michigan's 42 Big Ten Conference championships: Gustave Ferbert, Yost, Harry Kipke, Crisler, Oosterbaan, Elliott, Schembechler, Moeller, and Carr. Yost, Kipke, Crisler, Oosterbaan, and Carr have also won national championships with the Wolverines.

Schembechler is the program's all-time leader in wins (194) and games coached (247). Yost coached for the most seasons (25) and has the highest winning percentage (.833) of any coach who led the program for more than three seasons. Michigan had nine head coaches between 1900 and 1989, each of whom has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame either as a coach or as a player: Langdon Lea, Yost, George Little, Elton Wieman, Kipke, Crisler, Oosterbaan, Elliott, and Schembechler. The Wolverines' most recent head coach was Brady Hoke, who was hired in January 2011, and fired in December 2014.[2]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

Updated as of December 2, 2014
# Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs NCs
No coaches 1879–1890 34 23 10 1 .691 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 Crawford, FrankFrank Crawford, Mike Murphy 1891 9 4 5 0 .444 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 Barbour, FrankFrank Barbour 1892–1893 22 14 8 0 .636 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 McCauley, WilliamWilliam McCauley 1894–1895 20 17 2 1 .875 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 Ward, WilliamWilliam Ward 1896 10 9 1 0 .900 2 1 0 .667 0 0 0 0
6 Ferbert, GustaveGustave Ferbert 1897–1899 28 24 3 1 .875 6 2 0 .750 0 0 1 0
7 Lea, LangdonLangdon Lea 1900 10 7 2 1 .750 3 2 0 .600 0 0 0 0
8 Yost, Fielding H.Fielding H. Yost 1901–1923, 1925–1926 204 165 29 10 .833 42 10 2 .796 1 0 10 6
9 Little, GeorgeGeorge Little 1924 8 6 2 0 .750 4 2 0 .667 0 0 0 0
10 Wieman, EltonElton Wieman 1927–1928 16 9 6 1 .594 5 5 0 .500 0 0 0 0
11 Kipke, HarryHarry Kipke 1929–1937 76 46 26 4 .632 27 21 2 .560 0 0 4 2
12 Crisler, FritzFritz Crisler 1938–1947 90 71 16 3 .806 42 12 3 .777 1 0 2 1
13 Oosterbaan, BennieBennie Oosterbaan 1948–1958 100 63 33 4 .650 44 23 4 .648 1 0 3 1
14 Elliott, BumpBump Elliott 1959–1968 95 51 42 2 .547 32 34 3 .485 1 0 1 0
15 Schembechler, BoBo Schembechler 1969–1989 247 194 48 5 .796 143 23 3 .855 5 12 13 0
16 Moeller, GaryGary Moeller 1990–1994 60 44 13 3 .758 30 8 2 .775 4 1 3 0
17 Carr, LloydLloyd Carr 1995–2007 162 122 40 0 .753 81 23 0 .779 6 7 5 1
18 Rodriguez, RichRich Rodriguez 2008–2010 37 15 22 0 .405 6 18 0 .250 0 1 0 0
19 Hoke, BradyBrady Hoke 2011–2014 51 31 20 0 .608 18 14 0 .563 1 2 0 0

Statistical leaders[edit]

Updated as of December 2, 2014
Frank Barbour coached the Wolverines from 1892 to 1893.

The only Michigan head coaches with more than one post-season win are Lloyd Carr with six, Bo Schembechler with five, and Gary Moeller with four.

Profiles[edit]

William McCauley led Michigan to its first Western championship in 1895.

Murphy and Crawford (1891)[edit]

Although Michigan began fielding a football team in 1879, the first season in which the team had a coaching staff was 1891. While official sources list only Mike Murphy and Frank Crawford as the coaches of the 1891 team,[8] the Chicago Daily Tribune reported in November 1891 that the Michigan team was "coached systematically" by Murphy, Crawford, Horace Greely Prettyman and James Duffy.[9] After leaving Michigan, Murphy was the athletic trainer at the University of Pennsylvania for many years and coached the American track athletes at the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1908, and 1912. The Washington Post in 1913 called Murphy "the father of American track athletics."[10] He was considered the premier athletic trainer of his era and was said to have "revolutionized the methods of training athletes and reduced it to a science."[11] Crawford went on to coach at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, the University of Texas at Austin, and Nebraska Wesleyan University.[8][12]

Frank Barbour (1892–1893)[edit]

In 1892, Yale graduate Frank Barbour took over as head coach and led the Wolverines to a 14–8 record in two seasons as head coach.[13]

William McCauley (1894–1895)[edit]

Medical student William McCauley took over in 1894 and led the team to a 17–2–1 record from 1894 to 1895.[14] The 1895 team compiled an 8–1 record, won seven of their games by shutouts, and outscored their opponents by a combined score of 266 to 14. The sole loss in McCauley's final year was a 4–0 loss to Harvard, then one of the three great football powers.[15] Undefeated against Western opponents, the 1895 Wolverines laid claim to Michigan's first Western football championship.

William Ward (1896)[edit]

William Ward was the head coach for the 1896 team.[16] Ward's team won the first nine consecutive games by a combined score of 256 to 4. In the final game of the season, the team lost a close game to Amos Alonzo Stagg's University of Chicago team by a score of 7–6.[17] In his one season as head coach, Ward compiled a 9–1 record, which stands as the best winning percentage (.900) among all 18 Michigan football head coaches.

Gustave Ferbert (1897–1899)[edit]

Gustave Ferbert resigned in 1900 to prospect for gold in Alaska and became rich off his gold claims.

In 1897, Michigan's former star halfback Gustave Ferbert took over as head coach.[18] The 1898 team coached by Ferbert finished with a perfect 10–0 record and won Michigan's first Western Conference championship.[19][20] In May 1900, amid the Klondike Gold Rush, Ferbert resigned as Michigan's head coach and left for Alaska to search for gold.[21][22] After several years in the Klondike, Ferbert emerged in 1909 having become wealthy from his gold finds.[23][24]

Langdon "Biffy" Lea (1900)[edit]

With the departure of Ferbert, Michigan hired three-time Princeton All-American "Biffy" Lea to coach the 1900 team. Lea led the 1900 team to a 7–2–1 and a fifth place finish in the Western Conference.[25][26]

Ninety years of Hall of Fame inductees[edit]

Beginning with Lea, all nine individuals who served as head coach at Michigan during the 90 years from 1900 to 1989 have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame either as a player or coach. They are Lea,[27] Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost,[28] George Little,[29] Elton "Tad" Wieman,[30] Harry Kipke,[31] Fritz Crisler,[32] Bennie Oosterbaan,[33] Bump Elliott,[34] and Bo Schembechler.[35]

Fielding H. Yost (1901–1923, 1925–1926)[edit]

Princeton All-American Langdon Lea was head coach in 1900.

Fielding H. Yost has the longest tenure among Michigan head coaches, holding the position for 25 seasons from 1901–1923 and 1925–1926.[36] His famed "Point-a-Minute" teams from 1901 to 1905 outscored opponents 2,821 to 42.[36][37] The 1901 team was undefeated and unscored upon, having won all eleven games by a combined score of 550 to 0, including a 49–0 victory over Stanford in the first bowl game, the 1902 Rose Bowl.[36][38]

George Little (1924)[edit]

When Yost retired after the 1923 football season, his assistant George Little took over as the new head coach. Little served only one year in the position, leading the 1924 team to a 6–2 record.[39] Little later served as the football coach and athletic director at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, athletic director at Rutgers University, and executive secretary of the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame.[29]

Elton "Tad" Wieman (1927–1928)[edit]

When Elton Wieman announced his decision to attend Michigan, the Los Angeles Times called it "a calamity of almost national importance."

In 1925, Yost returned to the position of head coach through the end of the 1926 season. In 1927, assistant coach Elton "Tad" Wieman took over as head coach and led the Wolverines to a 9–6 record in two years as head coach.[40]

Harry Kipke (1929–1937)[edit]

All-American Harry Kipke won two national championships as Michigan's head coach in the 1930s.

In 1929, Michigan's former All-American halfback Harry Kipke was hired to replace Wieman. In his first year as head coach, the Wolverines finished in an eighth place tie in the Big Ten with a 5–3–1 record. However, Kipke quickly turned things around, leading the Wolverines to four straight conference championships and two national titles between 1930 and 1933. The 1932 and 1933 national championships teams did not lose any games. Kipke called his system "a punt, a pass, and a prayer" and reportedly coined the phrase, "A great defense is a great offense."[41] In 1934, Kipke’s Wolverines fell from national champions to a tenth place finish in the conference with a 1–7 record. Between 1934 and 1937, Kipke's team accumulated a 12–22 record.[42]

Fritz Crisler (1938–1947)[edit]

Fritz Crisler took over as head coach at Michigan in 1938 and remained in that position through the 1947 season.[43] Crisler is best known as "the father of two-platoon football,"[44] an innovation in which separate units of players were used for offense and defense. Crisler developed two-platoon football while serving as Michigan's head coach. Crisler also introduced the distinctive winged football helmet to the Michigan Wolverines in 1938.[45][46] Crisler's 1947 Michigan Wolverines football team, dubbed the "Mad Magicians," has been selected as the best team in the history of Michigan football.[47]

Bennie Oosterbaan (1948–1958)[edit]

Crisler retired as head coach after the 1947 season to become the school's full-time athletic director. He appointed his former assistant, Bennie Oosterbaan as the new head football coach. In the mid-1920s, Oosterbaan was a three-time first team All-American football end, a two-time All-American basketball player, and an All-Big Ten Conference baseball player. As recently as 2003, Oosterbaan was selected by Sports Illustrated as the fourth greatest athlete in the history of the State of Michigan.[48] In his first year as the head coach of the football team, the 1948 Michigan Wolverines football team won an Associated Press national championship. His 1950 team won the 1951 Rose Bowl.[33][49] Oosterbaan also coached the baseball and basketball teams at Michigan.[50]

Bump Elliott (1959–1968)[edit]

In 1959, Bump Elliott took over as head coach. Elliott had played halfback for Fritz Crisler's Michigan teams in 1946 and 1947 and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Most Valuable Player in the conference in 1947. He was Michigan's head coach for ten years from 1959 to 1968. His 1964 team won a Big Ten Conference championship and the 1965 Rose Bowl. He later served as the athletic director at the University of Iowa from 1970 to 1991, hiring such coaches as Dan Gable, Hayden Fry, Lute Olson, C. Vivian Stringer, and Dr. Tom Davis.[34][51]

Bo Schembechler (1969–1989)[edit]

Bo Schembechler served as Michigan's head coach for 21 years from 1969 to 1989. He is the winningest head coach in Michigan history with 194 wins. His teams won 13 Big Ten Conference championships.[35][52]

Gary Moeller (1990–1994)[edit]

Lloyd Carr served as head coach from 1995 to 2007.

Gary Moeller was named Michigan's head coach after Schembechler's retirement. During his five seasons as head coach (1990–1994), the Wolverines had a record of 44–13–3 and won or shared conference titles in 1990, 1991 and 1992.[53] Moeller resigned in May 1995 after tapes were released of his alleged drunken outburst following an arrest on a charge of disorderly conduct at a restaurant in Southfield, Michigan.[54][55][56]

Lloyd Carr (1995–2007)[edit]

Following Moeller's resignation, Lloyd Carr took over as Michigan's head football coach. Carr held the position for 13 years from 1995 to 2007. Under Carr, the Wolverines compiled a record of 122–40 and won or shared five Big Ten Conference titles (1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, and 2004). Carr's 1997 team was declared the national champion by the Associated Press. Carr also compiled a record of 19–8 against teams ranked in the Top 10.[57]

Rich Rodriguez (2008–2010)[edit]

In December 2007, Rich Rodriguez was hired as the head football coach at Michigan. Prior to joining Michigan, Rodriguez was the head coach at West Virginia University for seven years. In his three seasons as Michigan's head coach, Rodriguez compiled a record of 15–22, including a mark of 6–18 in Big Ten Conference games. His winning percentage of .405 overall and .250 in Big Ten play are the lowest among all 18 individuals to serve as Michigan's head football coach.[7]

Brady Hoke (2011–2014)[edit]

Brady Hoke was hired as Michigan's new head football coach in January 2011. He had previously been the defensive line coach at Michigan (1995–2002) and a head coach at Ball State University (2003–2008) and San Diego State University (2009–2010). In his first season as Michigan's head football coach, Hoke compiled a record of 11–2, as Michigan finished 6–2 in conference and second place in the newly formed Big Ten Legends Division and then won the Sugar Bowl. His 2013 squad finished 7–6 overall and 3–5 in Big Ten play. They lost the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl by a score of 31–14 to Kansas State. In 2014, the Wolverines finished 5–7. This marked only the third season since 1975 in which Michigan missed a bowl game. On December 2, 2014, Hoke was fired after four seasons. Hoke compiled a 31–20 record, including an 18–14 record in Big Ten play.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[3]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[4]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[5]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. pp. 62–63. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Chengelis, Angelique (December 2, 2014). "Brady Hoke fired by Michigan". The Detroit News. Retrieved December 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  5. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b "Michigan Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c d "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Michigan's All-Time Football Coaches Records, 1891-2009". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Mike Murphy and Frank Crawford". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  9. ^ "The Players From Ann Arbor: A New but Strong Team Which Will Play a Clean Game". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 14, 1891. 
  10. ^ "Mike Murphy Stood Alone as Developer of Athletes: Remarkable Intuition in Recognizing Champion Material in Rough and His Ability to Foretell Needs of His Proteges Factors in His Unparalleled Success". The Washington Post. June 8, 1913. 
  11. ^ "'Mike' Murphy, Noted Trainer, Passes Away: Dies After Prolonged Illness Surrounded by His Family; He Had Wonderful Career as Developer of Worldwide Athletes". The Philadelphia Inquirer. June 5, 1913. 
  12. ^ "Nebraska Wesleyan University Football Coaching Records". Nebraska Wesleyan University. Retrieved December 17, 2010. 
  13. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Frank E. Barbour". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  14. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: William L. McCauley". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  15. ^ "1895 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  16. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: William D. Ward". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  17. ^ "1896 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved December 16, 2009. 
  18. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Gustave H. Ferbert". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  19. ^ "University of Michigan 1898 Football Team". The Regents of the University of Michigan. March 21, 2007. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  20. ^ "Michigan Wins: Wrests Western Gridiron Championship From Chicago". The Lincoln Evening News. November 25, 1898. 
  21. ^ "Ex-Michigan Coach Stricken by Death". The Nevada State Journal. January 16, 1943. 
  22. ^ "Half-Back for Alaska: 'Dutch' Ferbert of Michigan Going to Hunt for Gold". Daily Iowa Capital. May 2, 1900. 
  23. ^ "Finds Wealth in Klondike: Famous Athlete Coming Back Home After Making a Rich Strike in the North". Coshcocton Daily Tribune (Ohio). October 23, 1909. 
  24. ^ "His Touchdown in the Arctic: How Former Football Star Made Good In Venture in the Frozen North, His Bulldog Courage". The Billings Daily Gazette. November 9, 1909. 
  25. ^ "1900 Michigan Football Team". University of Michigan. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  26. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Langdon (Biff) Lea". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Langdon "Biffy" Lea Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  29. ^ a b "George Little Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Tad Wieman Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Harry Kipke Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  32. ^ "Fritz Crisler Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  33. ^ a b "Bennie Oosterbaan Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  34. ^ a b "Bump Elliott Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  35. ^ a b "Bo Schembechler Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  36. ^ a b c "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Fielding H. Yost". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  37. ^ Allison Danzig (1956). "10: An Era of Yost, Stagg, and Thorpe". The History of American Football. Prentice-Hall, Inc. pp. 153–154. 
  38. ^ "1901 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  39. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: George Little". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  40. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Elton E. (Tad) Wieman". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  41. ^ Brandstatter, Jim (July 2005). Tales from Michigan Stadium, Vol. II. Sports Publishing. p. 170. ISBN 1-58261-888-7. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  42. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Harry G. Kipke". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  43. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Herbert O. (Fritz) Crisler". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  44. ^ "Fritz Crisler Hall of Fame profile". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  45. ^ "After 61 years, "Tiger" helmet returns to Princeton". Princeton Alumni Weekly. September 9, 1998. Retrieved October 14, 2010. 
  46. ^ "University of Michigan Football: Michigan's Winged Helmet". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  47. ^ Jones, Todd (2007). "Michigan". In MacCambridge, Michael. ESPN Big Ten College Football Encyclopedia. ESPN Enterprises. p. 60. ISBN 1-933060-49-2. 
  48. ^ "Michigan's Top 10 All-Time Athletes". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. Retrieved December 27, 2008. 
  49. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Bennie G. Oosterbaan". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  50. ^ 2007-08 Men's Basketball Media Guide. University of Michigan. 2007. 
  51. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Chalmers W. (Bump) Elliott". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  52. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Glenn E. (Bo) Schembechler". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  53. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Gary 0. Moeller". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  54. ^ Cain, Charlie. "Reports Detail Moeller's Confrontation With Police." Detroit News, in Seattle Times, May 3, 1995. Retrieved on July 14, 2009.
  55. ^ Elgass, Jane R. (May 8, 1995). "Moeller resigns; Carr will be interim head coach". The University Record (The Regents of the University of Michigan). Retrieved November 21, 2010. 
  56. ^ "Moeller Was Fired From Michigan, Newspaper Says -- Document Indicates Coach Was Forced Out Of Program". The Detroit News (Seattle Times Company). July 6, 1995. Retrieved November 21, 2010. 
  57. ^ "University of Michigan Football Coaches: Lloyd Carr". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 

External links[edit]