List of Mir spacewalks

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A view of Mir backdropped by the limb of the Earth. In view are four cylindrical modules covered in white insulation arranged in a cross shape about a small, central sphere. Another module projects backward from this sphere, and a small module is attached to the far end of that. Each module is sprouting various solar arrays, cranes and other spindly equipment, with Soyuz and Progress spacecraft docked to the forward and aft ports of the complex.
A view of Mir on 12 June 1998 as seen from the departing Space Shuttle Discovery during STS-91

Mir (Russian: Мир, IPA: [ˈmʲir]; lit. Peace or World) was a Soviet and later Russian space station, operational in low Earth orbit from 1986 to 2001. With a mass greater than that of any previous space station, Mir was constructed from 1986 to 1996 with a modular design, the first to be assembled in this way. The station was the largest artificial satellite orbiting the Earth until its deorbit on 21 March 2001, a record now surpassed by the International Space Station (ISS). Mir served as a microgravity research laboratory in which crews conducted experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and spacecraft systems in order to develop technologies required for the permanent occupation of space.[1][2]

Following the success of the Salyut programme, Mir represented the next stage in the Soviet Union's space station programme. The first module of the station, known as the core module or base block, was launched in 1986, and was followed by six further modules (Kvant-1 (1987), Kvant-2 (1989), Kristall (1990), Spektr (1995), the docking module (1995) and Priroda (1996)), all launched by Proton rockets (with the exception of the docking module). When complete, the station consisted of seven pressurised modules and several unpressurised components. Power was provided by several solar arrays mounted directly on the modules. The station was maintained at an orbit between 296 km (184 mi) and 421 km (262 mi) altitude and travelled at an average speed of 27,700 km/h (17,200 mph), completing 15.7 Earth orbits per day.[2][3][4]

Spacewalks (Extra-vehicular activities, or EVAs) in support of the operation of the station were major events in the assembly and maintenance of the orbital laboratory. EVAs were performed to install new components onto the station, to repair and replace various experiments, systems and equipment, and to install, monitor and retrieve scientific experiments. The first EVA carried out at Mir was held on 11 April 1987, when EO-2 crewmembers Yury Romanenko and Aleksandr Laveykin assisted in the docking of the Kvant-1 module. The longest EVA was performed on 17 July 1990, when EO-6 crewmembers Anatoly Solovyev and Aleksandr Balandin left the station to repair their spacecraft, Soyuz TM-9, then encountered difficulties shutting the airlock hatch upon their return. The total time for that spacewalk was seven hours and sixteen minutes, close to the absolute limit of their Orlan-DMA spacesuits.[5][6]

In total, eighty EVAs were conducted around Mir from 1987 to 2000. Sixty-three EVAs were conducted from Kvant-2's airlock, fifteen from the core module's docking node (of which three were so-called 'intravehicular activities', or IVAs, within Spektr) and two from the airlock of the Space Shuttle Atlantis.[2]

Contents
1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000

dagger denotes EVAs performed from the core module's docking node.
double-dagger denotes EVAs performed from the airlock of the Space Shuttle Atlantis.
All other EVAs were performed from the airlock in Kvant-2.
EVAs conducted during different principal expeditions (EO, Russian: экспедиция основная, lit. mission primary) are separated by a wide blue line. Space Shuttle missions (STS) are not separated from the expedition during which they took place.

# Mission Spacewalkers Start (UTC) End (UTC) Duration
1 EO-2
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Yury Romanenko
Aleksandr Laveykin
11 April 1987
19:41
11 April 1987
23:21
3 hours, 40 minutes
Inspected the rear port of the core module following the failure of Kvant-1 to achieve a successful hard docking on 9 April and discovered a piece of debris left behind following the departure of Progress 28 on 27 March. This was removed, and the subsequent hard docking of the new module was observed.[1][2][5]
2 EO-2
EVA 2
EVA conducted from node.
Yury Romanenko
Aleksandr Laveykin
12 June 1987
16:55
12 June 1987
18:48
1-hour, 53 minutes
Installed the first part of a new solar array, delivered by Kvant-1, into a motor mount on the dorsal surface of the core module.[1][2][5]
3 EO-2
EVA 3
EVA conducted from node.
Yury Romanenko
Aleksandr Laveykin
16 June 1987
15:30
16 June 1987
18:45
3 hours, 15 minutes
Installed the second part of the new solar array on the core module, installed the array's power cables and affixed sample exposure cassettes to the exterior of the station.[1][2][5]
4 EO-3
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Vladimir Titov
Musa Manarov
26 February 1988
09:00
26 February 1988
13:25
4 hours, 25 minutes
Replaced a segment of the core module's dorsal solar array with a new one which produced telemetry to allow the gradual degradation in the efficiency of the array to be monitored and inspected the exterior of the station.[1][2][5]
5 EO-3
EVA 2
EVA conducted from node.
Vladimir Titov
Musa Manarov
30 June 1988
05:33
30 June 1988
10:43
5 hours, 10 minutes
Began repair of an X-ray telescope on Kvant-1 by opening the thermal insulation covering it and exposing the part requiring replacement. Repair was halted after the tool designed to remove the failed part from the telescope broke.[1][2][5]
6 EO-3
EVA 3
EVA conducted from node.
Vladimir Titov
Musa Manarov
20 October 1988
05:59
20 October 1988
10:11
4 hours, 12 minutes
Completed the repair of the X-ray telescope begun on the previous EVA and affixed a mount near the core module's docking node for the French Era experiment. First use of new Orlan-DMA spacesuit.[1][2][5]
7 EO-4
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Alexander Volkov
Jean-Loup Chrétien
9 December 1988
09:57
9 December 1988
15:57
6 hours, 0 minutes
Installed French Echantillon exposure cassette and deployed, tested & jettisoned French Era truss experiment.[1][2][5]
8 EO-5
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Alexander Viktorenko
Aleksandr Serebrov
8 January 1990
20:23
8 January 1990
23:19
2 hours, 56 minutes
Installed two star trackers on the exterior of Kvant-1 to assist the station's attitude control.[1][2][5]
9 EO-5
EVA 2
EVA conducted from node.
Alexander Viktorenko
Aleksandr Serebrov
11 January 1990
18:01
11 January 1990
20:55
2 hours, 54 minutes
Retrieved the Echantillon cassette, dismantled the Era mount, installed exposure cassettes on the exterior of the station and reconfigured the docking apparatus in the core module's docking node in preparation for the arrival of Kristall.[1][2][5]
10 EO-5
EVA 3
Alexander Viktorenko
Aleksandr Serebrov
26 January 1990
12:09
26 January 1990
15:11
3 hours, 2 minutes
First EVA from Kvant-2's airlock. Affixed a mount just outside the airlock for the Ikar cosmonaut manoeuvring unit, dismantled the module's now redundant Kurs antenna, installed exposure cassettes and erected Kvant-2's scan platform.[1][2][5]
11 EO-5
EVA 4
Alexander Viktorenko
Aleksandr Serebrov
1 February 1990
08:15
1 February 1990
13:14
4 hours, 59 minutes
First test of the Ikar cosmonaut manoeuvring unit.[1][2][5]
12 EO-5
EVA 5
Alexander Viktorenko
Aleksandr Serebrov
5 February 1990
06:08
5 February 1990
09:53
3 hours, 45 minutes
Second test of the Ikar cosmonaut manoeuvring unit.[1][2][5]
13 EO-6
EVA 1
Anatoly Solovyev
Aleksandr Balandin
17 July 1990
13:06
17 July 1990
20:22
7 hours, 16 minutes
Conducted repairs to the insulation of the damaged Soyuz TM-9. Found that the airlock hatch was damaged and would not shut when the EVA was concluded, so the back-up secondary airlock in Kvant-2 was used.[1][2][5]
14 EO-6
EVA 2
Anatoly Solovyev
Aleksandr Balandin
26 July 1990
11:15
26 July 1990
14:46
3 hours, 31 minutes
Inspected airlock hatch, stowed equipment used during the repair of Soyuz TM-9 on the previous EVA, and managed, with a great deal of manual effort, to close the damaged airlock hatch.[1][2][5]
15 EO-7
EVA 1
Gennadi Manakov
Gennadi Strekalov
30 October 1990
21:45
31 October 1990
01:33
3 hours, 48 minutes
Attempted to repair the damaged Kvant-2 airlock hatch, discovered that the hinge required replacement.[1][2][5]
16 EO-8
EVA 1
Viktor Afanasyev
Musa Manarov
7 January 1991
17:03
7 January 1991
22:21
5 hours, 18 minutes
Conducted successful repair of Kvant-2's airlock hatch, affixed a mount onto the core module, retrieved exposure cassettes and removed a camera from Kvant-2's scan platform.[1][2][5]
17 EO-8
EVA 2
Viktor Afanasyev
Musa Manarov
23 January 1991
10:59
23 January 1991
16:32
5 hours, 33 minutes
Installed a Strela crane on the mount affixed on the previous EVA and retrieved exposure cassettes.[1][2][5]
18 EO-8
EVA 3
Viktor Afanasyev
Musa Manarov
26 January 1991
09:00
26 January 1991
15:20
6 hours, 20 minutes
Affixed two mounts to Kvant-1 in preparation for the relocation of Kristall's solar arrays, set up a laser rangefinder on Kristall for use by Buran shuttles and installed the Sprut-5 spectrometer on the exterior of Kvant-2.[1][2][5]
19 EO-8
EVA 4
Viktor Afanasyev
Musa Manarov
25 April 1991
20:29
26 April 1991
00:03
3 hours, 34 minutes
Inspected a faulty Kurs antenna on Kvant-1, retrieved exposure cassettes, replaced the camera removed on their first EVA from Kvant-2's scan platform and tested a prototype thermomechanical joint near the airlock.[1][2][5]
20 EO-9
EVA 1
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
24 June 1991
21:11
25 June 1991
02:09
4 hours, 58 minutes
Repaired the broken Kurs antenna on Kvant-1 and installed a prototype thermomechanical joint.[1][2][5]
21 EO-9
EVA 2
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
28 June 1991
19:02
28 June 1991
22:26
3 hours, 24 minutes
Installed the University of California's TREK cosmic ray detector on Kvant-2 and retrieved the prototype thermomechanical joint installed on the previous EVA.[1][2][5]
22 EO-9
EVA 3
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
15 July 1991
11:45
15 July 1991
17:41
5 hours, 56 minutes
Installed a work platform on Kvant-1 in preparation for the installation of the Sofora truss.[1][2][5]
23 EO-9
EVA 4
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
19 July 1991
11:10
19 July 1991
16:38
5 hours, 28 minutes
Installed the base plate and first three segments of the Sofora truss on Kvant-1.[1][2][5]
24 EO-9
EVA 5
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
23 July 1991
09:15
23 July 1991
14:57
5 hours, 42 minutes
Continued the assembly of the Sofora truss on Kvant-1.[1][2][5]
25 EO-9
EVA 6
Anatoly Artsebarsky
Sergei Krikalev
27 July 1991
08:44
27 July 1991
15:33
6 hours, 49 minutes
Completed the assembly of the Sofora truss on Kvant-1 and raised the Soviet flag on the far end.[1][2][5]
26 EO-10
EVA 1
Alexander Volkov
Sergei Krikalev
20 February 1992
20:09
21 February 1992
00:21
4 hours, 12 minutes
First EVA conducted following the collapse of the USSR. Retrieved the work platform installed on Kvant-1 prior to the construction of the Sofora truss, cleaned a TV camera lens on Kvant-1, retrieved the telemetered panel from the core module's dorsal solar array and retrieved exposure cassettes from around Kvant-2's airlock. During the initial stages of the EVA, the heat exchanger in Volkov's spacesuit failed and he relied on an umbilical from Kvant-2 for life support for the rest of the EVA.[1][2][5]
27 EO-11
EVA 1
Aleksandr Viktorenko
Aleksandr Kaleri
8 July 1992
12:38
8 July 1992
14:41
2 hours, 3 minutes
Installed two new gyrodynes on Kvant-2.[1][2][5]
28 EO-12
EVA 1
Anatoly Solovyev
Sergei Avdeyev
3 September 1992
13:32
3 September 1992
17:28
3 hours, 56 minutes
Prepared the Sofora truss and Progress M-14 for the installation of the VDU thruster block.[1][2][5]
29 EO-12
EVA 2
Anatoly Solovyev
Sergei Avdeyev
7 September 1992
11:47
7 September 1992
16:55
5 hours, 8 minutes
Configured the VDU thruster for installation, installed the thruster's umbilical on the Sofora truss and removed the Soviet flag from the truss.[1][2][5]
30 EO-12
EVA 3
Anatoly Solovyev
Sergei Avdeyev
11 September 1992
10:06
11 September 1992
15:50
5 hours, 44 minutes
Completed the installation of the VDU thruster block on the Sofora truss.[1][2][5]
31 EO-12
EVA 4
Anatoly Solovyev
Sergei Avdeyev
15 September 1992
07:49
15 September 1992
11:22
3 hours, 33 minutes
Installed a Kurs antenna on Kristall's APAS port and retrieved exposure cassettes.[1][2][5]
32 EO-13
EVA 1
Gennadi Manakov
Aleksandr Poleshchuk
19 April 1993
17:15
19 April 1993
22:40
5 hours, 25 minutes
Installed a solar array motor onto one of the mounts on Kvant-1 and discovered that one of the handles of the Strela crane was missing.[1][2][5]
33 EO-13
EVA 2
Gennadi Manakov
Aleksandr Poleshchuk
18 June 1993
17:25
18 June 1993
21:58
4 hours, 33 minutes
Installed a solar array motor onto the other mount fixed to Kvant-1 and replaced the missing handle on the Strela crane.[1][2][5]
34 EO-14
EVA 1
Vasily Tsibliyev
Aleksandr Serebrov
16 September 1993
05:57
16 September 1993
10:16
4 hours, 18 minutes
Affixed a second truss mount on Kvant-1 and attached a box containing the Rapana truss to it.[1][2][5]
35 EO-14
EVA 2
Vasily Tsibliyev
Aleksandr Serebrov
20 September 1993
03:51
20 September 1993
07:05
3 hours, 14 minutes
Assembled the Rapana truss on the mount attached to Kvant-1 on the previous EVA and installed new exposure cassettes.[1][2][5]
36 EO-14
EVA 3
Vasily Tsibliyev
Aleksandr Serebrov
28 September 1993
00:57
28 September 1993
02:48
1-hour, 52 minutes
Installed and retrieved exposure cassettes and began a video recording of the condition of the station's exterior.[1][2][5]
37 EO-14
EVA 4
Vasily Tsibliyev
Aleksandr Serebrov
22 October 1993
15:47
22 October 1993
16:25
0 hours, 38 minutes
Continued the video recording of the condition of the station's exterior and installed a meteoroid monitoring package.[1][2][5]
38 EO-14
EVA 5
Vasily Tsibliyev
Aleksandr Serebrov
29 October 1993
13:38
29 October 1993
17:50
4 hours, 12 minutes
Completed the video recording of the condition of the station's exterior, inspected the base of the Sofora truss and retrieved exposure cassettes.[1][2][5]
39 EO-16
EVA 1
Yuri Malenchenko
Talgat Musabayev
9 September 1994
07:00
9 September 1994
12:06
5 hours, 4 minutes
Inspected the front port of the core module following a collision with Progress M-24 and the exterior of Kristall following a collision with Soyuz TM-17. Affixed a mount to the core module to install a second Strela crane, and installed exposure cassettes.[1][2][5]
40 EO-16
EVA 2
Yuri Malenchenko
Talgat Musabayev
13 September 1994
06:30
13 September 1994
12:32
6 hours, 1-minute
Inspection of Kristall's solar arrays, the array mounts on Kvant-1 and the Sofora truss. Retrieved experiments from the Rapana truss.[1][2][5]
41 EO-18
EVA 1
Vladimir Dezhurov
Gennadi Strekalov
12 May 1995
04:20
12 May 1995
10:35
6 hours, 14 minutes
Retracted the left-side solar array of Kristall.[1][2][5][7]
42 EO-18
EVA 2
Vladimir Dezhurov
Gennadi Strekalov
17 May 1995
02:38
17 May 1995
09:20
6 hours, 52 minutes
Released the previously retracted solar array on Kristall, transferred it to Kvant-1 and attached it to the previously installed motor and mount on the left side of the module.[1][2][5][7]
43 EO-18
EVA 3
Vladimir Dezhurov
Gennadi Strekalov
22 May 1995
00:10
22 May 1995
05:25
5 hours, 14 minutes
Completed the installation of the solar array moved on the previous EVA, and partially retracted the remaining array on Kristall (the array could not be fully retracted as it jammed during the procedure).[1][2][5][7]
44 EO-18
EVA 4
EVA conducted from node.
Vladimir Dezhurov
Gennadi Strekalov
28 May 1995
22:22
28 May 1995
22:43
0 hours, 21 minutes
Reconfigured the core module's docking node for the relocation of Kristall.[1][2][5][7]
45 EO-18
EVA 5
EVA conducted from node.
Vladimir Dezhurov
Gennadi Strekalov
1 June 1995
22:05
1 June 1995
22:28
0 hours, 23 minutes
Reconfigured the core module's docking node for the arrival of Spektr.[1][2][5][7]
46 EO-19
EVA 1
Anatoly Solovyev
Nikolai Budarin
14 July 1995
03:56
14 July 1995
09:30
5 hours, 34 minutes
Inspected a faulty solar array on Kvant-2, discovering that it had been fouled by EVA equipment. Released a jammed solar array on Spektr and inspected the right-side docking port on the core module's docking node.[1][2][5][7]
47 EO-19
EVA 2
Anatoly Solovyev
Nikolai Budarin
19 July 1995,
00:39
19 July 1995,
03:47
3 hours, 8 minutes
Prepared for the deployment of the Mir Infrared Spectrometer (MIRAS), retrieved exposure cassettes and the TREK cosmic-ray detector and installed new exposure cassettes. The cooling system in Solovyov's spacesuit failed almost immediately, and so he spent most of the EVA reliant on an umbilical from Kvant-2 for life support. Upon their return, difficulties were encountered again with the airlock hatch.[1][2][5][7]
48 EO-19
EVA 3
Anatoly Solovyev
Nikolai Budarin
21 July 1995
00:28
21 July 1995
06:18
5 hours, 35 minutes
Installed the Belgian-French Mir Infrared Spectrometer (MIRAS) and inspected Kristall's partially retracted solar array.[1][2][5][7]
49 EO-20
EVA 1
Sergei Avdeyev
Thomas Reiter
20 October 1995
11:50
20 October 1995
17:06
5 hours, 16 minutes
First EVA conducted by an ESA astronaut. Installed the European Space Exposure Facility (ESEF) on Spektr and exchanged the exposure cassette in the Komza experiment.[1][2][5][7]
50 EO-20
EVA 2
EVA conducted from node.
Yuri Gidzenko
Sergei Avdeyev
8 December 1995
19:23
8 December 1995
19:52
0 hours, 37 minutes
Reconfigured the core module's docking node in preparation for the arrival of Priroda.[1][2][5][7]
51 EO-20
EVA 3
Yuri Gidzenko
Thomas Reiter
8 February 1996
14:03
8 February 1996
17:08
3 hours, 6 minutes
Remounted the Ikar cosmonaut manoeuvring unit outside the Kvant-2 airlock, exchanged cassettes on the European Space Exposure Facility (ESEF) and attempted to retrieve the redundant Kurs antenna on Kristall.[1][2][5][7]
52 EO-21
EVA 1
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
15 March 1996
01:04
15 March 1996
06:55
5 hours, 51 minutes
Installed a second Strela crane on the right-hand side of the core module, and made preparations for the installation of the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA).[1][2][5][7]
53 STS-76
EVA 1
EVA conducted from Atlantis.
Michael Clifford
Linda Godwin
27 March 1996
06:34
27 March 1996
12:36
6 hours, 2 minutes, 28 seconds
Mounted the Mir Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP) to and retrieved a camera from the docking module.[2][7][8]
54 EO-21
EVA 2
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
20 May 1996
22:50
21 May 1996
04:10
5 hours, 20 minutes
Transferred the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) from the docking module, mounted it to the motor attached to the right-hand side of Kvant-1 and inflated a model Pepsi can for a commercial.[1][2][5][7]
55 EO-21
EVA 3
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
24 May 1996
20:47
25 May 1996
02:30
5 hours, 34 minutes
Extended the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) installed onto Kvant-1 on the previous EVA.[1][2][5][7]
56 EO-21
EVA 4
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
30 May 1996
18:20
30 May 1996
22:40
4 hours, 20 minutes
Installed the German Modular Optoelectronic Multispectral/Stereo Scanner (MOMS-2P) on Priroda and handrails on Kvant-2.[1][2][5][7]
57 EO-21
EVA 5
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
6 June 1996
16:56
6 June 1996
20:30
3 hours, 34 minutes
Swapped the exposure cassettes in the Komza experiment and installed new micrometeoroid detectors on the exterior of the station.[1][2][5][7]
58 EO-21
EVA 6
Yury Onufriyenko
Yury Usachov
13 June 1996
12:45
13 June 1996
18:27
5 hours, 42 minutes
Dismantled the Rapana truss on Kvant-1 and erected the Strombus truss in its place, then completed the deployment of the TRAVERS radar antenna on Priroda following the failure of its automatic deployment mechanism.[1][2][5][7]
59 EO-22
EVA 1
Valery Korzun
Aleksandr Kaleri
2 December 1996
15:54
2 December 1996
21:52
5 hours, 57 minutes
Began installation of cables to connect the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) into the station's electrical system and redeployed the Rapana truss dismantled on the previous EVA on the far end of the Strombus truss.[1][2][5]
60 EO-22
EVA 2
Valery Korzun
Aleksandr Kaleri
9 December 1996
13:50
9 December 1996
20:28
6 hours, 36 minutes
Completed installation of cables to connect the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) into the station's electrical system and transferred the Kurs antenna from Kristall to the docking module.[1][2][5]
61 EO-23
EVA 1
Vasily Tsibliyev
Jerry Linenger
29 April 1997
05:10
29 April 1997
10:09
4 hours, 59 minutes
Retrieved the Particle Impact Experiment (PIE) and Mir Sample Return Experiment (MSRE) packages, deployed the Advanced Materials Exposure Experiment (AMEE) and tested the Orlan-M spacesuit.[1][2][5][9][10]
62 EO-24
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Anatoly Solovyev
Pavel Vinogradov
22 August 1997
11:14
22 August 1997
14:30
3 hours, 16 minutes
First 'IVA' into Spektr following the module's depressurisation after the Progress M-34 collision. Installed a modified Konus drogue in the core module's docking node and wired it up to connect the module's solar arrays to the station's electrical system. Inspected the interior of Spektr and retrieved equipment from the module.[1][2][5]
63 EO-24
EVA 2
Anatoly Solovyev
Michael Foale
6 September 1997
01:07
6 September 1997
07:07
6 hours, 0 minutes
Inspected the exterior of Spektr for signs of damage and manually reoriented the module's solar arrays.[1][2][5][10]
64 STS-86
EVA 1
EVA conducted from Atlantis.
Scott Parazynski
Vladimir Titov
1 October 1997
17:29
1 October 1997
22:30
5 hours, 1-minute
Retrieved the Mir Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP) from the docking module and affixed a solar arrays cap to aid Spektr repairs.[11]
65 EO-24
EVA 3
EVA conducted from node.
Anatoly Solovyev
Pavel Vinogradov
20 October 1997
09:40
20 October 1997
16:18
6 hours, 38 minutes
Second Spektr IVA to reconfigure the module's electrical system.[1][2][5]
66 EO-24
EVA 4
Anatoly Solovyev
Pavel Vinogradov
3 November 1997
03:32
3 November 1997
09:36
6 hours, 4 minutes
Retracted and removed the Kristall solar arrays that had been mounted to the left side of Kvant-1 and deployed the Sputnik 40 subsatellite.[1][2][5]
67 EO-24
EVA 5
Anatoly Solovyev
Pavel Vinogradov
6 November 1997
00:12
6 November 1997
06:24
6 hours, 12 minutes
Installed the MSB solar array launched with the docking module on to the newly vacated mount on the left side of Kvant-1.[1][2][5]
68 EO-24
EVA 6
Anatoly Solovyev
Pavel Vinogradov
8 January 1998
23:08
9 January 1998
02:14
3 hours, 6 minutes
Retrieved the Advanced Materials Exposure Experiment (AMEE) package and conducted repairs to the Kvant-2 airlock hatch.[1][2][5]
69 EO-24
EVA 7
Anatoly Solovyev
David Wolf
14 January 1998
21:12
14 January 1998
01:04
3 hours, 52 minutes
Used a spectroreflectometer to inspect the condition of the radiators on Kvant-2.[1][2][5]
- EO-25 Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
3 March 1998 0 hours, 30 minutes
Attempted to conduct an EVA to prepare for the repair of the damaged solar array on Spektr, but were unable to open the hatch and were forced to postpone the EVA.[2][5]
70 EO-25
EVA 1
Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
1 April 1998
13:35
1 April 1998
20:15
6 hours, 40 minutes
Installed EVA anchors to provide access to Spektr's damaged solar array.[1][2][5]
71 EO-25
EVA 2
Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
6 April 1998
13:35
6 April 1998
17:50
4 hours, 15 minutes
Installed a brace on Spektr's damaged solar array to reinforce it.[1][2][5]
72 EO-25
EVA 3
Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
11 April 1998
09:55
11 April 1998
16:20
6 hours, 25 minutes
Removed the depleted VDU thruster block from the Sofora truss.[1][2][5]
73 EO-25
EVA 4
Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
17 April 1998
07:40
17 April 1998
14:13
6 hours, 33 minutes
Prepared for the installation of a new VDU thruster block on the Sofora truss.[1][2][5]
74 EO-25
EVA 5
Talgat Musabayev
Nikolai Budarin
22 April 1998
05:34
22 April 1998
11:55
6 hours, 21 minutes
Installed a new VDU thruster block on the Sofora truss.[1][2][5]
75 EO-26
EVA 1
EVA conducted from node.
Gennady Padalka
Sergei Avdeyev
15 September 1998
20:00
15 September 1998
20:30
0 hours, 30 minutes
Reseated electrical connections inside Spektr controlling the module's solar arrays.[1][2][5]
76 EO-26
EVA 2
Gennady Padalka
Sergei Avdeyev
10 November 1998
19:23
11 November 1998
01:18
5 hours, 54 minutes
Installed the Comets micrometeoroid detector in preparation for the upcoming Leonids meteor shower and deployed the Sputnik 41 subsatellite.[1][2][5]
77 EO-27
EVA 1
Viktor Afanasyev
Jean-Pierre Haigneré
16 April 1999
04:37
16 April 1999
10:56
6 hours, 19 minutes
Retrieved the Comets micrometeoroid detector, installed new experiments and deployed the Sputnik 99 subsatellite.[1][2][5]
78 EO-27
EVA 2
Viktor Afanasyev
Sergei Avdeyev
23 July 1999
11:06
23 July 1999
17:13
6 hours, 7 minutes
Installed and attempted to deploy a prototype communications antenna on the far end of the Sofora truss.[1][2][6]
79 EO-27
EVA 3
Viktor Afanasyev
Sergei Avdeyev
28 July 1999
09:37
28 July 1999
14:59
5 hours, 22 minutes
Completed the deployment of a prototype communications antenna on the far end of the Sofora truss.[1][2][6]
80 EO-28
EVA 1
Sergei Zalyotin
Aleksandr Kaleri
12 May 2000
10:44
12 May 2000
15:47
5 hours, 3 minutes
Final EVA to be conducted at Mir. Tested a sealant dispenser by sealing cracks on the exterior of the station, inspected the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), dismantled a solar battery, photographed the station's exterior and retrieved experiments.[1][2][6]
A man dressed in a spacesuit clings to a truss structure, manipulating a second truss with his left hand. Cabling can be seen running along both trusses, and the Earth's horizon can be seen in the background against the blackness of space.
A man dressed in a spacesuit seen crawling along a white, cylindrical space station module. A large solar array can be seen projecting from the top of the module, and various other pieces of apparatus are visible. The Earth's horizon and space are visible behind the solar array.
A man dressed in a white spacesuit with a red stripe seen clinging to the end of a boom-like crane, moving over a white space station module. Various trusses, solar arrays and other structures project from the module, and the Earth is visible in the background.
A man dressed in a white spacesuit with a red stripe manoeuvres along a boom-like crane towards a white cone-shaped space station module. Four arrays, one of which is damaged, project from the module, and the blackness of space forms the background. The rim of the porthole through which the photograph was taken is visible to the right of the image.
Yury Onufriyenko scales the Sofora truss during EO-21. Yury Usachov seen working on Kvant-1 during EO-21. Vasily Tsibliyev traverses Mir using a Strela crane during EO-23. Anatoly Solovyev inspects the exterior of Spektr during the second EVA of EO-24.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca Wade, Mark (5 March 2011). "Mir". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce Harland, David (30 November 2004). The Story of Space Station Mir. New York: Springer-Verlag New York Inc. ISBN 978-0-387-23011-5. 
  3. ^ Clark, Philip S (2000). "Orbital manoeuvres of the Mir complex". In Hall, Rex. The History of Mir 1986–2000. London: British Interplanetary Society. pp. 40–52. ISBN 0-9506597-4-6. 
  4. ^ "Orbital period of a planet". CalcTool. Retrieved 12 September 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by Shayler, David J (2000). "Mir EVA Logs 1987–2000". In Hall, Rex. The History of Mir 1986–2000. London: British Interplanetary Society. pp. 101–105. ISBN 0-9506597-4-6. 
  6. ^ a b c d Shayler, David J (2001). "Mir EVA Logs 1987–2001". In Hall, Rex. Mir: The Final Year. London: British Interplanetary Society. pp. 9–10 & 19–21. ISBN 0-9506597-5-4. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r McDonald, Sue (December 1998). Mir Mission Chronicle. NASA. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  8. ^ Dumoulin, Jim (29 June 2001). "STS-76 Day 6 Highlights". NASA. Retrieved 12 February 2011. 
  9. ^ Linenger, Jerry (1 January 2001). Off the Planet: Surviving Five Perilous Months Aboard the Space Station Mir. New York, USA: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07-137230-5. 
  10. ^ a b Burrough, Bryan (7 January 1998). Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir. London, UK: Fourth Estate Ltd. ISBN 978-1-84115-087-1. 
  11. ^ Dumoulin, Jim (29 June 2001). "STS-86 Day 7 Highlights". NASA. Retrieved 12 February 2011. 

See also[edit]