List of Missouri Tigers head football coaches

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A headshot of a man with a microphone to his mouth wearing a black visor with the word "MIZZOU" in gold on the front.
Gary Pinkel, current head coach of the Missouri Tigers

The Missouri Tigers football program is a college football team that represents the University of Missouri in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The team has had 31 head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1890 with the nickname Tigers.[1] Missouri joined the Western Interstate University Football Association in December 1891, later winning the conference championship three years in a row. The conference disbanded after the 1897 season and Missouri remained independent until joining the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. After several changes, the conference eventually became the Big Eight Conference. The Tigers became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the Big Eight disbanded.[2] Missouri subsequently left the Big 12 following the 2011 season and joined as the 14th member of the SEC effective for the 2012 season.[3] The Tigers have played 1,180 games during their 119 seasons. In those seasons, seven coaches have led Missouri to postseason bowl games: Don Faurot, Chauncey Simpson, Dan Devine, Al Onofrio, Warren Powers, Larry Smith, and Gary Pinkel. Nine coaches have also won conference championships with the Tigers: Harry Orman Robinson, C. D. Bliss, William Roper, Chester Brewer, John F. Miller, Gwinn Henry, Faurot, Simpson and Devine.

Faurot is the all-time leader in games coached (190), years coached (19) and total wins (101). Roper has the highest winning percentage of any coach, with a percentage of .938 during his one year. Of coaches who served more than one season, James Phelan leads with a .813 winning percentage. Frank Carideo is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Tigers have had (.111). Onofrio and Smith have both been awarded coach of the year honors in their conference by the Associated Press. Of the 31 Tigers coaches, five have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Roper, Phelan, Faurot, Frank Broyles and Devine. The current head coach is Gary Pinkel, who was hired in November 2000.[4]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships and selected awards[A 5]
# Name Season(s) GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CC
[A 6]
Awards
1 McRae, A. L.A. L. McRae 1890 3 2 1 0 .667
2 Reid, HalHal Reid 1891 4 3 1 0 .750
3 Jones, E. H.E. H. Jones 1892 3 1 2 0 .333 1 2 0 .333
4 Robinson, Harry OrmanHarry Orman Robinson 1893–1894 14 8 6 0 .571 4 2 0 .667 2
5 Bliss, C. D.C. D. Bliss 1895 8 7 1 0 .875 2 1 0 .667 1
6 Patterson, FrankFrank Patterson 1896 12 7 5 0 .583 0 3 0 .000
7 Young, CharlesCharles Young 1897 11 5 6 0 .455 0 2 0 .000
8 Fultz, DaveDave Fultz 1898–1899 17 10 6 1 .618
9 Murphy, Fred W.Fred W. Murphy 1900–1901 18 6 10 2 .389
10 O'Dea, PatPat O'Dea 1902 8 5 3 0 .625
11 McLean, JohnJohn McLean 1903–1905 27 9 17 1 .352
12 Monilaw, W. J.W. J. Monilaw 1906–1908 25 18 6 1 .740 4 4 0 .500
13 Roper, WilliamWilliam Roper[8]dagger 1909 8 7 0 1 .938 4 0 1 .900 1
14 Hollenback, BillBill Hollenback 1910 8 4 2 2 .625 2 1 1 .625
15 Brewer, ChesterChester Brewer 1911–1913 24 14 8 2 .625 6 5 2 .538 1
16 Schulte, HenryHenry Schulte 1914–1917 32 16 14 2 .531 10 9 2 .524
17 Miller, John F.John F. Miller 1919 8 5 1 2 .750 4 0 1 .900 1
18 Phelan, JamesJames Phelan[9]dagger 1920–1921 16 13 3 0 .813 9 3 0 .750
19 Kelley, ThomasThomas Kelley 1922 8 5 3 0 .625 4 3 0 .571
20 Henry, GwinnGwinn Henry 1923–1931 77 40 28 9 .578 27 16 6 .612 3
21 Carideo, FrankFrank Carideo 1932–1934 27 2 23 2 .111 1 13 1 .100
22 Faurot, DonDon Faurot[10]dagger 1935–1942, 1946–1956 190 101 79 10 .558 61 34 9 .630 0 4 3
23 Simpson, ChaunceyChauncey Simpson 1943–1945 28 12 14 2 .464 10 3 2 .733 0 1 1
24 Broyles, FrankFrank Broyles[11]dagger 1957 10 5 4 1 .550 3 3 0 .500
25 Devine, DanDan Devine[12]dagger 1958–1970 137 93 37 7 .704 62 23 3 .722 4 2 2
26 Onofrio, AlAl Onofrio 1971–1977 79 38 41 0 .481 21 28 0 .429 1 1 Big Eight AP Coach of the Year (1972)[13]
27 Powers, WarrenWarren Powers 1978–1984 82 46 33 3 .579 24 22 3 .520 3 2
28 Widenhofer, WoodyWoody Widenhofer 1985–1988 44 12 31 1 .284 7 14 0 .333
29 Stull, BobBob Stull 1989–1993 55 15 38 2 .291 8 27 0 .229
30 Smith, LarryLarry Smith 1994–2000 80 33 46 1 .419 19 25 0 .432 1 1 Big 12 AP Coach of the Year (1997)[14]
31 Pinkel, GaryGary Pinkel 2001–present 163 102 63 .618 49 48 .505 5 4

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[5]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[6]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[7]
  5. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2011 college football season.
  6. ^ Missouri was not in an athletic conference from 1890 through 1891 and 1898 through 1907.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Mascot & Football Traditions". MUTigers.com. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  2. ^ "Missouri Historical Date". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  3. ^ "SEC accepts Missouri for 2012–13". ESPN.com. The Associated Press. 2011-11-07. Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  4. ^ "Missouri Picks Pinkel". CBS Sports. The Associated Press. 2000-11-29. Archived from the original on 2010-02-26. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  5. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  6. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  7. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bill Roper". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  9. ^ "Hall of Famers: Jim Phelan". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  10. ^ "Hall of Famers: Don Faurot". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  11. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Broyles". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  12. ^ "Hall of Famers: Dan Devine". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  13. ^ "Former Missouri football coach Onofrio dies". USA Today. The Associated Press. 2004-11-05. Archived from the original on 2010-03-01. Retrieved 2010-03-01. "Onofrio, the Associated Press Big Eight coach of the year in 1972..." 
  14. ^ "Missouri Cans Football Coach". CBS News. The Associated Press. 2000-11-19. Archived from the original on 2010-03-01. Retrieved 2010-03-01. "In 1997, after 13 consecutive losing seasons at Missoui, Smith guided the Tigers to a 7–5 record and the Holiday Bowl, and was honored as Big 12 coach of the year by The Associated Press."