List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Hamilton, Ontario

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This is a list of National Historic Sites of Canada (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in Hamilton, Ontario. There are 15 National Historic Sites designated in Hamilton,[1] of which one (HMCS Haida) is administered by Parks Canada (identified below by the beaver icon Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png).[2] Burlington Heights was designated in 1929 and was the first site designated within what are now the boundaries of Hamilton.

National Historic Sites located elsewhere in Ontario are listed at List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Ontario.

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

Media related to National Historic Sites of Canada in Ontario at Wikimedia Commons

Site Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Battle of Stoney Creek [3] 1813 (battle) 1960 Stoney Creek
43°13′02″N 79°45′58″W / 43.217271°N 79.766244°W / 43.217271; -79.766244 (Battle of Stoney Creek)
The site of a British victory that marked a turning point in the War of 1812, representing the most advanced position achieved by American forces in the Niagara campaign View of the Stoney Creek Battlefield Monument
Burlington Heights [4][5] 1813-14 (wartime activities) 1929 Hamilton
43°16′14″N 79°53′10″W / 43.27056°N 79.88611°W / 43.27056; -79.88611 (Burlington Heights)
An assembly point and supply depot for the defence of the Niagara Peninsula and support of the navy on Lake Ontario during the War of 1812 Stone marker at Burlington Heights
Dundurn Castle [6][7] 1835 (completed) 1984 Hamilton
43°16′10″N 79°53′05″W / 43.269481°N 79.884649°W / 43.269481; -79.884649 (Dundurn Castle)
Picturesque-style villa of magnate Sir Allan Napier MacNab, 1st Baronet View of Dundurn Castle
Erland Lee (Museum) Home [8][9] 1808 (completed) 2002 Hamilton
43°12′24″N 79°43′18″W / 43.20667°N 79.72167°W / 43.20667; -79.72167 (Erland Lee (Museum) Home)
A Carpenter Gothic farmhouse recognized as the birthplace of an important national and international women's movement, where the constitution of the first Women’s Institute was drafted Exterior view of Erland Lee Home
Former Hamilton Customs House [10][11] 1860 (completed) 1990 Hamilton
43°15′58.91″N 79°52′1.97″W / 43.2663639°N 79.8672139°W / 43.2663639; -79.8672139 (Former Hamilton Customs House)
A former customs house now serving as the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre; a noted example of Italianate architecture, which was popular in Canada from the 1840s to the 1870s The front facade of the former customs house in Hamilton
Former Hamilton Railway Station (Canadian National) [12][13] 1931 (completed) 2000 Hamilton
43°15′58.91″N 79°52′1.97″W / 43.2663639°N 79.8672139°W / 43.2663639; -79.8672139 (Former Hamilton Railway Station (Canadian National))
Built by Canadian National Railway, the railway station is a rare surviving example of an interwar station built according to the tenets of the City Beautiful movement; it served as an important immigration gateway after the Second World War Exterior view of the Former Hamilton Railway Station
Griffin House [14][15] 1827 (completed) 2008 Hamilton
43°14′9.42″N 80°0′11.26″W / 43.2359500°N 80.0031278°W / 43.2359500; -80.0031278 (Griffin House)
A rare surviving example of a four-room house typical in Upper Canada in the early 19th century; was owned by Enerals Griffin, a Black immigrant from Virginia who settled here in 1834, and the house is associated with Black settlement in British North America and the Underground Railroad Exterior view of Griffin House
Hamilton Waterworks [16][17] 1859 (completed) 1977 Hamilton
43°15′22.45″N 79°46′14.51″W / 43.2562361°N 79.7706972°W / 43.2562361; -79.7706972 (Hamilton Waterworks)
Built to deliver large quantities of clean water for safe drinking and fire control to rapidly expanding Hamilton, the waterworks is a rare surviving example of a Victorian industrial complex that is largely architecturally and functionally intact Main buildings and chimney of Hamilton Waterworks
HMCS HaidaBeaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png [18][19] 1942 (constructed) 1984 Hamilton
43°16′31″N 79°51′19″W / 43.27531°N 79.85538°W / 43.27531; -79.85538 (HMCS Haida)
Last of the World War II Tribal-class destroyers; moored and open to the public as a museum ship at Hamilton Harbour View of HMCS Haida at Hamilton Harbour
John Weir Foote Armoury [20][21] 1888 (completed) 1989 Hamilton
43°15′42.76″N 79°51′58.42″W / 43.2618778°N 79.8662278°W / 43.2618778; -79.8662278 (John Weir Foote Armoury)
Named after John Weir Foote, the north section of the building is representative of the second evolutionary stage in drill hall construction in Canada (in the 1870s to 1890s) Exterior view of the John Weir Foote Armoury
McQuesten House / Whitehern [22][23] 1848 (completed) 1962 Hamilton
43°15′17″N 79°52′20″W / 43.2546°N 79.8721°W / 43.2546; -79.8721 (McQuesten House / Whitehern)
The two-storey neoclassical home of Thomas McQuesten, now serving as a museum; a superior and intact example of mid-19th-century residential architecture in Ontario Exterior view of Whitehern
Royal Botanical Gardens [24][25][26] 1920s (established) 1993 Hamilton
43°17′27.54″N 79°52′30.71″W / 43.2909833°N 79.8751972°W / 43.2909833; -79.8751972 (Royal Botanical Gardens)
Comprising 1,100 hectares (2,700 acres) clustered around Burlington Bay, it is one of Canada’s most important botanical gardens, and is the international registration authority for cultivar names of lilacs; named Canada’s "National Focal Point" for plant conservation targets under the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity Rock gardens at the Royal Botanical Gardens
Sandyford Place [27][28] 1856 (completed) 1975 Hamilton
43°15′6.98″N 79°52′23.72″W / 43.2519389°N 79.8732556°W / 43.2519389; -79.8732556 (Sandyford Place)
A row of stone terrace houses, typical of the construction style in Hamilton at a time when Scottish settlers sought to recreate the stone terraces of Scottish towns; a good example of the housing erected for merchants in the mid-19th century External view of the Sandyford Place row houses
St. Paul's Presbyterian Church / Former St. Andrew's Church [29][30] 1857 (completed) 1990 Hamilton
43°15′17″N 79°52′13″W / 43.254761°N 79.870282°W / 43.254761; -79.870282 (St. Paul's Presbyterian Church / Former St. Andrew's Church)
An excellent representative example of the Gothic Revival style in a small, urban parish church View of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church
Victoria Hall [31][32] 1888 (completed) 1995 Hamilton
43°15′20″N 79°52′02″W / 43.255691°N 79.867267°W / 43.255691; -79.867267 (Victoria Hall)
A three-and-a-half-storey, commercial building with a hand-made, galvanized sheet-metal façade on the front of its upper storeys; a very rare example of an in-situ, hand-made, sheet-metal façade in Canada, and one of the most architecturally accomplished of the surviving sheet metal façades in the country Victory Hall Front Elevation


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hamilton, Stoney Creek, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  2. ^ Hamilton, National Historic Sites of Canada - administered by Parks Canada
  3. ^ Battle of Stoney Creek. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  4. ^ Burlington Heights, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  5. ^ Burlington Heights. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  6. ^ Dundurn Castle, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  7. ^ Dundurn Castle. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  8. ^ Erland Lee (Museum) Home, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  9. ^ Erland Lee (Museum) Home. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  10. ^ Former Hamilton Customs House, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  11. ^ Former Hamilton Customs House. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  12. ^ Former Hamilton Railway Station (Canadian National), Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  13. ^ Former Hamilton Railway Station (Canadian National). Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  14. ^ Griffin House, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  15. ^ Griffin House. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  16. ^ Hamilton Waterworks, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  17. ^ Hamilton Waterworks. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  18. ^ HMCS Haida, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  19. ^ HMCS Haida. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  20. ^ John Weir Foote Armoury, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  21. ^ John Weir Foote Armoury. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  22. ^ McQuesten House / Whitehern, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  23. ^ McQuesten House / Whitehern. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  24. ^ Royal Botanical Gardens, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  25. ^ Royal Botanical Gardens. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  26. ^ "Botanical Garden named National Focal Point for Plant Conservation". Botanic Gardens Conservation International. 3 August 2006. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  27. ^ Sandyford Place, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  28. ^ Sandyford Place. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  29. ^ St. Paul's Presbyterian Church / Former St. Andrew's Church, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  30. ^ St. Paul's Presbyterian Church / Former St. Andrew's Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  31. ^ Victoria Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  32. ^ Victoria Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places.