List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Toronto

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This is a list of National Historic Sites of Canada (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in the country's most populous city, Toronto, Ontario. There are 36 National Historic Sites in Toronto.[1] The first National Historic Site to be designated in Toronto was Fort York in 1923.[2][3]

National Historic Sites located elsewhere in Ontario are listed at List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Ontario.

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

Site Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Annesley Hall [4][5] 1903 (completed) 1990 Toronto
43°40′04″N 79°23′35″W / 43.66778°N 79.39306°W / 43.66778; -79.39306 (Annesley Hall)
The first purpose-built women's’ residence on a Canadian university campus, and a good example of the Queen Anne Revival style in institutional architecture Exterior view of Annesley Hall
Balmoral Fire Hall [6][7] 1911 (completed) 1990 Toronto
43°41′09″N 79°23′38″W / 43.685833°N 79.393870°W / 43.685833; -79.393870 (Balmoral Fire Hall)
A rare example of the Queen Anne Revival style used for a fire hall Exterior view of Bamoral Fire Hall
Bank of Upper Canada Building [8][9] 1825 (completed) 1977 Toronto
43°39′06.54″N 79°22′15.5″W / 43.6518167°N 79.370972°W / 43.6518167; -79.370972 (Bank of Upper Canada Building)
An early 19th-century bank building, representative of the rise of Toronto as a commercial centre and the role played by the Bank of Upper Canada in the development of Upper Canada Exterior view of the Bank of Upper Canada Building
Bead Hill [10][11] 1600s (village established) 1991 Toronto
43°48′14.77″N 79°8′24.4″W / 43.8041028°N 79.140111°W / 43.8041028; -79.140111 (Bead Hill)
An archaeological site in Rouge Park with the only known intact remains of a 17th-century Seneca village in the country
Birkbeck Building [12][13] 1908 (completed) 1986 Toronto
43°39′2.54″N 79°22′40.49″W / 43.6507056°N 79.3779139°W / 43.6507056; -79.3779139 (Birkbeck Building)
A four-storey office building typical of the premises of many financial institutions prevalent in central business districts of Canadian cities before the First World War; representative of a transitional building from that period which combined historical styles with (then) modern design and construction techniques Exterior view of the Birkbeck Building
Eaton's 7th Floor Auditorium and Round Room [14][15] 1930 (completed) 1983 Toronto
43°39′39″N 79°23′00″W / 43.660929°N 79.383302°W / 43.660929; -79.383302 (Eaton's 7th Floor Auditorium and Round Room)
A foyer, restaurant and auditorium, designed by French architect Jacques Carlu and muralist Natacha Carlu, located within the former Eaton's College Street department store; remarkable examples of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne interior design Interior view of the Round Room restaurant in 1931
Chapel of St. James-the-Less Anglican Church [16][17] 1861 (completed) 1990 Toronto
43°40′10.4″N 79°22′8.32″W / 43.669556°N 79.3689778°W / 43.669556; -79.3689778 (Chapel of St. James-the-Less Anglican Church)
The Chapel is a noted example of High Victorian Gothic Revival architecture and exemplifies the small chapels built in this style in Canada Exterior view of the Chapel of St. James-the-Less Anglican Church in winter
Eglinton Theatre [18][19] 1936 (completed) 1993 Toronto
43°42′15.96″N 79°24′38.66″W / 43.7044333°N 79.4107389°W / 43.7044333; -79.4107389 (Eglinton Theatre)
A cinema representing one of the best examples of the Art Deco-style in Canadian theatre design Exterior view of the Eglinton Theatre at night
Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres [20][21] 1914 (completed) 1982 Toronto
43°39′11″N 79°22′45″W / 43.65306°N 79.37917°W / 43.65306; -79.37917 (Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres)
A pair of stacked theatres built by renown theatre-designer Thomas W. Lamb, originally built for vaudeville; they are the last remaining operational double-decker theatres in the world Exterior view of the ticket booth at the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres
Fort York [22][23] 1793 (established), 1815 (current fort completed) 1923 Toronto
43°38′20.50″N 79°24′12″W / 43.6390278°N 79.40333°W / 43.6390278; -79.40333 (Fort York)
The birthplace of the settlement that would become Toronto and the primary defence for (what was then) York, Upper Canada, the Fort now serves as a museum containing the largest collection of War of 1812 buildings in Canada and many of the oldest buildings in Toronto Exterior photo of an interpreter dressed as a soldier at Fort York
Fourth York Post Office [24][25] 1835 (completed) 1980 Toronto
43°39′06.65″N 79°22′14.34″W / 43.6518472°N 79.3706500°W / 43.6518472; -79.3706500 (Fourth York Post Office)
Also known as the "First Toronto Post Office" (it was the fourth post office in York, but the first one to serve the settlement when it became Toronto in 1834), it is one of the earliest surviving examples in Canada of a building purpose-built as a post office; typical of small, early 19th-century public buildings, combining public offices and a private residence Exterior photo of the front of the First Toronto Post Office
George Brown House [26][27] 1877 (completed) 1976 Toronto
43°39′21″N 79°23′42″W / 43.655825°N 79.39502°W / 43.655825; -79.39502 (George Brown House)
The residence of George Brown, founder of (what is now) The Globe and Mail and a Father of Confederation; the site in Toronto most associated with the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad 1880 sketch of the procession for the funeral of George Brown passing in front of George Brown House
Gooderham and Worts Distillery [28][29] 1859 to 1927 (construction of extant distillery buildings) 1988 Toronto
43°39′2.628″N 79°21′35.17″W / 43.65073000°N 79.3597694°W / 43.65073000; -79.3597694 (Gooderham and Worts Distillery)
Forty historic distillery buildings on a 13-acre site, representative of the history of the Canadian distilling industry and Toronto's industrial past View of the Cooperage with its prominent cupola
Gouinlock Buildings / Early Exhibition Buildings [30][31] 1904 to 1912 (completed) 1988 Toronto
43°37′58″N 79°24′58″W / 43.63278°N 79.41611°W / 43.63278; -79.41611 (Gouinlock Buildings / Early Exhibition Buildings)
Five buildings (the Fire Hall/Police Station, Government Building, Horticulture Building, Music Building and Press Building) on the grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition; the largest and finest group of early 20th century exhibition buildings in Canada View of the Press Building
Heliconian Hall [32][33] 1876 (completed) 2008 Toronto
43°40′19.03″N 79°23′36.04″W / 43.6719528°N 79.3933444°W / 43.6719528; -79.3933444 (Heliconian Hall)
Originally constructed as a church in Yorkville in the Carpenter Gothic style, the building has since 1923 served as a unique multidisciplinary arts club specifically for women View of the front facade of Heliconian Hall
John Street Roundhouse (Canadian Pacific) [34][35] 1931 (completed) 1990 Toronto
43°38′27″N 79°23′09″W / 43.640862°N 79.385925°W / 43.640862; -79.385925 (John Street Roundhouse (Canadian Pacific))
Located in Toronto’s formerly vast railway lands near Union Station, it is Canada's best surviving example of a roundhouse; now occupied by the Toronto Railway Heritage Centre, the Steam Whistle brewery and a furniture store Interior view of the John Street Roundhouse
Kensington Market [36][37] 1815 (first development (Bellevue Estate)) 2006 Toronto
43°39′17.18″N 79°24′02.44″W / 43.6547722°N 79.4006778°W / 43.6547722; -79.4006778 (Kensington Market)
A neighbourhood noted for its network of narrow streets and lanes fronted by rows of small houses and shops; since the early 20th century, it has been home to numerous successive waves of immigrant communities, making it a microcosm of Canada's multiculturalism View of pedestrians and cyclists in Kensington Market
Maple Leaf Gardens [38][39] 1931 (completed) 2007 Toronto
43°39′44″N 79°22′49″W / 43.66222°N 79.38028°W / 43.66222; -79.38028 (Maple Leaf Gardens)
Built for the Toronto Maple Leafs, the arena is regarded as of the most renowned "shrines" in the history of ice hockey; for 70 years, it was one of Canada's foremost venues for large-scale sporting events, concerts and political events Exterior view of main entrance and marquee of Maple Leaf Gardens
Massey Hall [40][41] 1894 (completed) 1981 Toronto
43°39′15″N 79°22′44.50″W / 43.65417°N 79.3790278°W / 43.65417; -79.3790278 (Massey Hall)
A gift to the City of Toronto from wealthy industrialist Hart Massey, the concert hall has been one of the country's most important cultural institutions and is renowned for its outstanding acoustics Exterior view of main entrance and neon signage of Massey Hall at night
Metallic Roofing Company Offices [42][43] 1897 (completed) 1984 Toronto
43°38′21.01″N 79°25′37.76″W / 43.6391694°N 79.4271556°W / 43.6391694; -79.4271556 (Metallic Roofing Company Offices)
A unique Beaux-Arts style building decorated entirely in pressed metal; the building was dismantled in 1982 when the site was redeveloped, and it is held by the Ontario Heritage Trust for eventual reconstruction Metallic Roofing Company Offices surrounded by hoarding, prior to the demolition of the building.
Montgomery's Tavern [44][45] 1837 (battle) 1925 Toronto
43°42′34″N 79°23′56″W / 43.7095°N 79.3990°W / 43.7095; -79.3990 (Montgomery's Tavern)
The site of an abortive insurrection by William Lyon MacKenzie during the Upper Canada Rebellion; the rebellion ultimately contributed to the establishment of responsible government in the colony Sketch of the Battle of Montgomery's Tavern
Mount Pleasant Cemetery [46][47] 1876 (opened) 2000 Toronto
43°41′47″N 79°23′06″W / 43.696351°N 79.384882°W / 43.696351; -79.384882 (Mount Pleasant Cemetery)
An outstanding example of picturesque design inspired by the 19th-century tradition of rural cemeteries in a naturalistic setting; many of the grave markers are representative of significant epochs in the history of Toronto and the rest of the country View of the Eaton mausoleum in Mount Pleasant Cemetery
Old Toronto City Hall and York County Court House [48][49] 1899 (completed) 1984 Toronto
43°39′9″N 79°22′54″W / 43.65250°N 79.38167°W / 43.65250; -79.38167 (Old Toronto City Hall and York County Court House)
One of Canada’s finest examples of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture and a symbol of Toronto's prosperity and rapid urbanization in the late 19th century Exterior view of the Old City Hall clock tower
Old Toronto Post Office / Old Bank of Canada [50][51] 1853 (completed) 1958 Toronto
43°39′00″N 79°22′35″W / 43.64999°N 79.376355°W / 43.64999; -79.376355 (Old Toronto Post Office / Old Bank of Canada)
A noted example of Greek Revival architecture in Canada Exterior view of the Toronto Street Post Office
Osgoode Hall [52][53] 1832 (original wing completed) 1979 Toronto
43°39′08″N 79°23′08″W / 43.65222°N 79.38556°W / 43.65222; -79.38556 (Osgoode Hall)
Housing the Law Society of Upper Canada, courts of law and, until 1959, the only law school in the province, Osgoode Hall symbolizes the legal profession and court system in Ontario; a landmark on Queen Street West, it is also known for its ornate interiors Interior view of the Great Library in Osgoode Hall
Royal Alexandra Theatre [54][55] 1907 (completed) 1985 Toronto
43°38′51″N 79°23′15″W / 43.64741°N 79.38750°W / 43.64741; -79.38750 (Royal Alexandra Theatre)
One of the last theatres of its type built in Canada and arguably the best surviving example, it is a nationally significant theatre that has played a central role in the social and cultural life of Toronto Exterior view of the Royal Alexandra Theatre
Royal Conservatory of Music [56][57] 1881 (Ihnatowycz Hall completed) 1995 Toronto
43°40′4.7″N 79°23′46.50″W / 43.667972°N 79.3962500°W / 43.667972; -79.3962500 (Royal Conservatory of Music)
Originally constructed as the first home of McMaster University, Ihnatowycz Hall has housed the Royal Conservatory of Music since 1962; some of Canada's some of the most prominent musicians and music teachers have studied at the Conservatory, and it has played a significant role in music education across the country Exterior view of the Royal Conservatory of Music
St. Anne's Anglican Church [58][59] 1908 (completed) 1996 Toronto
43°39′2.24″N 79°25′50.35″W / 43.6506222°N 79.4306528°W / 43.6506222; -79.4306528 (St. Anne Anglican Church)
The church contains a unique cycle of paintings, executed in 1923, by ten noted artists, including three members of the Group of Seven, under the supervision of J. E. H. MacDonald Exterior view of St. Anne's Anglican Church
St. George's Hall (Arts and Letters Club) [60][61] 1891 (completed) 2007 Toronto
43°39′28.13″N 79°22′57.51″W / 43.6578139°N 79.3826417°W / 43.6578139; -79.3826417 (St. George's Hall (Arts and Letters Club))
Since 1920, St. George's Hall has been a gathering place for painters, writers, musicians, architects, actors and patrons of the arts; an important venue and catalyst for artistic activity in Canada Exterior view of St. George's Hall
St. Lawrence Hall [62][63] 1850 (completed) 1967 Toronto
43°39′01″N 79°22′20″W / 43.65028°N 79.37222°W / 43.65028; -79.37222 (St. Lawrence Hall)
St. Lawrence Hall was for many years Toronto's chief social and cultural centre, and is among the finest 19th century public buildings in Canada Exterior view of the cupola above St. Lawrence Hall
The Grange [64][65] 1817 (completed) 1970 Toronto
43°39′11.25″N 79°23′32.7″W / 43.6531250°N 79.392417°W / 43.6531250; -79.392417 (The Grange)
An historic Georgian manor in downtown Toronto, it is one of the few surviving residential estates belonging to prominent citizens from the settlement of York; the oldest remaining brick house in Toronto Exterior view of the Grange
The Studio Building [66][67] 1914 (completed) 2005 Toronto
43°40′24″N 79°23′10″W / 43.67325°N 79.386083°W / 43.67325; -79.386083 (The Studio Building)
An early Canadian artists’ studio in the modernist style, with associations with important Canadian artists including the Group of Seven; designed by architect Eden Smith for painter Lawren Harris, it contains six purpose-built studio spaces and, at one time, artists such as Tom Thomson, Arthur Lismer and Thoreau MacDonald lived and worked on site Exterior view of the Studio Building
Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building [68][69] 1939 (completed) 1989 Toronto
43°37′55.01″N 79°23′44.65″W / 43.6319472°N 79.3957361°W / 43.6319472; -79.3957361 (Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building)
Among the first group of airport terminals to be funded and approved by the then new Department of Transport as part of the development of Trans-Canada Air Lines; one of very few early terminal buildings to have survived and likely the oldest operating terminal of its kind in the country Exterior view of the original Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building
Union Station (Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk) [70][71] 1927 (completed) 1975 Toronto
43°38′43″N 79°22′50″W / 43.64528°N 79.38056°W / 43.64528; -79.38056 (Union Station (Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk))
The finest example in Canada of classical Beaux-Arts railway stations, and the largest of the great urban stations built in the country during the early 20th century; illustrative of an era when railways were expanding and Toronto was becoming a modern metropolis View of the grand hall in Toronto's Union Station
University College [72][73] 1859 (completed) 1968 Toronto
43°39′44″N 79°23′45″W / 43.66222°N 79.39583°W / 43.66222; -79.39583 (University College)
One of the oldest collegiate buildings in the country, associated both with the development of non-denominational, publicly supported institutions of higher education in Canada, and with the development of the University of Toronto Exterior view of University College
Women's College Hospital [74][75] 1883 (founded) 1995 Toronto
43°39′42″N 79°23′15″W / 43.661686°N 79.387497°W / 43.661686; -79.387497 (Women's College Hospital)
Founded at a time when women's access to medical education and hospital practice was extremely restricted, the hospital uniquely emphasizes women's health issues and women as health care providers; symbolic of the struggle and contribution of Canadian women to the medical profession Exterior view of Women's College Hospital

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Toronto, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  2. ^ Toronto, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  3. ^ Fort York, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  4. ^ Annesley Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  5. ^ Annesley Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  6. ^ Balmoral Fire Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  7. ^ Balmoral Fire Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  8. ^ Bank of Upper Canada Building, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  9. ^ Bank of Upper Canada Building, National Register of Historic Places
  10. ^ Bead Hill, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  11. ^ Bead Hill, Toronto National Historic Sites Urban Walks - Parks Canada
  12. ^ Birkbeck Building, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  13. ^ Birkbeck Building, National Register of Historic Places
  14. ^ Eaton's 7th Floor Auditorium and Round Room, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  15. ^ Eaton's 7th Floor Auditorium and Round Room, National Register of Historic Places
  16. ^ Chapel of St. James-the-Less Anglican Church, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  17. ^ Chapel of St. James-the-Less Anglican Church, National Register of Historic Places
  18. ^ Eglinton Theatre, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  19. ^ Eglinton Theatre, National Register of Historic Places
  20. ^ Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  21. ^ Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres, National Register of Historic Places
  22. ^ Fort York, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  23. ^ Fort York, National Register of Historic Places
  24. ^ Fourth York Post Office, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  25. ^ Fourth York Post Office, National Register of Historic Places
  26. ^ George Brown House, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  27. ^ George Brown House, National Register of Historic Places
  28. ^ Gooderham and Worts Distillery, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  29. ^ Gooderham and Worts Distillery, National Register of Historic Places
  30. ^ Gouinlock Buildings / Early Exhibition Buildings, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  31. ^ Gouinlock Buildings / Early Exhibition Buildings, National Register of Historic Places
  32. ^ Heliconian Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  33. ^ Heliconian Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  34. ^ John Street Roundhouse (Canadian Pacific), Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  35. ^ John Street Roundhouse (Canadian Pacific), National Register of Historic Places
  36. ^ Kensington Market, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  37. ^ Kensington Market, National Register of Historic Places
  38. ^ Maple Leaf Gardens, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  39. ^ Maple Leaf Gardens, National Register of Historic Places
  40. ^ Massey Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  41. ^ Massey Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  42. ^ Metallic Roofing Company Offices, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  43. ^ Metallic Roofing Company Offices, Toronto National Historic Sites Urban Walks
  44. ^ Montgomery's Tavern, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  45. ^ Montgomery's Tavern, National Register of Historic Places
  46. ^ Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  47. ^ Mount Pleasant Cemetery, National Register of Historic Places
  48. ^ Old Toronto City Hall and York County Court House, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  49. ^ Old Toronto City Hall and York County Court House, National Register of Historic Places
  50. ^ Old Toronto Post Office / Old Bank of Canada, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  51. ^ Old Toronto Post Office / Old Bank of Canada, National Register of Historic Places
  52. ^ Osgoode Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  53. ^ Osgoode Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  54. ^ Royal Alexandra Theatre, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  55. ^ Royal Alexandra Theatre, National Register of Historic Places
  56. ^ Royal Conservatory of Music, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  57. ^ Royal Conservatory of Music, National Register of Historic Places
  58. ^ St. Anne's Anglican Church, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  59. ^ St. Anne's Anglican Church, National Register of Historic Places
  60. ^ St. George's Hall (Arts and Letters Club), Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  61. ^ St. George's Hall (Arts and Letters Club), National Register of Historic Places
  62. ^ St. Lawrence Hall, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  63. ^ St. Lawrence Hall, National Register of Historic Places
  64. ^ The Grange, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  65. ^ The Grange, National Register of Historic Places
  66. ^ The Studio Building, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  67. ^ The Studio Building, National Register of Historic Places
  68. ^ Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  69. ^ Toronto Island Airport Terminal Building, National Register of Historic Places
  70. ^ Union Station (Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk), Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  71. ^ Union Station (Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk), National Register of Historic Places
  72. ^ University College, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  73. ^ University College, National Register of Historic Places
  74. ^ Women's College Hospital, Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada
  75. ^ Women's College Hospital, National Register of Historic Places