List of National Natural Landmarks in Wyoming

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

From List of National Natural Landmarks, these are the National Natural Landmarks in Wyoming. There are 6 in total: 3 are canyons, one is a depression, one is a cliff, and the last is a stream that divides and flows into two oceans.

Name Image Date Location County Description
1 The Big Hollow November 1980 Laramie
41°18′48″N 105°43′17″W / 41.313209°N 105.721307°W / 41.313209; -105.721307
Albany A large wind eroded deflection basin.
2 Como Bluff Como Bluff.jpg May 1966, November 1973 Rock River
41°52′53″N 106°04′34″W / 41.881384°N 106.076217°W / 41.881384; -106.076217
Albany A ridge noted for multiple significant fossil discoveries from the late Jurassic of the Mesozoic Era.
3 Crooked Creek Natural Area 1966 Big Horn A rich source of fossils of Early Cretaceous land vertebrates.
4 Red Canyon November 1980 Lander
42°40′20″N 108°39′29″W / 42.672087°N 108.658175°W / 42.672087; -108.658175
Fremont A canyon exposing a number of sedimentary formations as well as 10,000 years of human habitation.
5 Sand Creek December 1984 40°59′49″N 105°46′14″W / 40.99694°N 105.77056°W / 40.99694; -105.77056 (Sand Creek) Albany The most spectacular examples of cross-bedded sandstone and “topple blocks” in North America. NNL area extends across Colorado border.
6 Two Ocean Pass October 1965 Teton Wilderness
44°02′35″N 110°10′30″W / 44.04293°N 110.17495°W / 44.04293; -110.17495
Teton A pass located on the continental divide. Here, at a place called Parting of the Waters, North Two Ocean Creek splits into its two distributaries which form the headwaters of Pacific Creek and Atlantic Creek. Waters from these two creeks ultimately flow the Pacific and Atlantic ocean drainages, respectively.