List of National Treasures of Japan (temples)

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A large wooden building with a hip-and-gable main roof and a secondary roof giving the impression of a two-storied building. Between these roofs there is an open railed veranda surrounding the building. Below the secondary roof there is an attached pent roof. Behind the building there is a five-storied wooden pagoda with surrounding pent roof below the first roof.
Kon-dō and five-storied pagoda at Hōryū-ji, two of the world's oldest wooden structures dating to around 700[1][2]

The term "National Treasure" has been used in Japan to denote cultural properties since 1897.[3] The definition and the criteria have changed since the inception of the term. The temple structures in this list were designated national treasures when the Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties was implemented on June 9, 1951. The items are selected by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology based on their "especially high historical or artistic value".[4][5] This list presents 153[nb 1] entries of national treasure temple structures from the late 7th-century Classical Asuka period to the early modern 19th-century Edo period. The number of structures listed is more than 153, because in some cases groups of related structures are combined to form a single entry. The structures include main halls such as kon-dō, hon-dō, Butsuden; pagodas, gates, belfries (鐘楼, shōrō?), corridors, other halls and structures that are part of a Buddhist temple.[5]

History of Buddhist temples in Japan[edit]

Buddhism arrived in Japan in the mid–6th century, and was officially adopted in the wake of the Battle of Shigisan in 587, after which Buddhist temples began to be constructed.[6] Soga no Umako built Hōkō-ji, the first temple in Japan, between 588 to 596. It was later renamed as Asuka-dera for Asuka, the name of the capital where it was located. Prince Shotoku actively promoted Buddhism and ordered the construction of Shitennō-ji in Osaka (593) and Hōryū-ji near his palace in Ikaruga (completed in 603).[7] During the ancient period, the temple layout was strictly prescribed and followed mainland styles, with a main gate facing south, and the most sacred area surrounded by a semi-enclosed roofed corridor (kairō) accessible through a middle gate (chūmon). The sacred precinct contained a pagoda, which acted as a reliquary for sacred objects, and an image hall (kon-dō). The complex might have other structures such as a lecture hall (kōdō), a belfry (shōrō), a sutra repository (kyōzō), priests' and monks' quarters and bathhouses.[8][9] The ideal temple had a heart formed by seven structures—called Shichidō garan. Buddhism, and the construction of temples, spread from the capital to outlying areas in the Hakuhō period from 645 to 710.[7] Because of fire, earthquakes, typhoons and wars, few of the ancient temples remain. Hōryū-ji, rebuilt after a fire in 670, is the only temple with 7th century structures which are the oldest extant wooden buildings in the world.[8]

Unlike early Shinto shrines, early Buddhist temples were highly ornamental and strictly symmetrical.[10] Starting with the late 7th century Hōryū-ji, temples began to move towards indigenous methods expressed by irregular ground plans that resulted in an asymmetric arrangement of buildings, greater use of natural materials such as cypress bark instead of roof tiling, and an increased awareness of natural environment with the placement of buildings among trees. This adaption was assisted by the syncretism of Shinto and Buddhism.[10][11][12] During the first half of the 8th century, Emperor Shōmu decreed temples and nunneries be erected in each province and that Tōdai-ji be built as a headquarters for the network of temples.[13][14][15] The head temple was inaugurated in 752 and was of monumental dimensions with two seven-storied pagodas, each ca. 100 m (330 ft) tall and a Great Buddha Hall (daibutsuden) about 80 m × 70 m (260 ft × 230 ft).[15] Nara period Buddhism was characterised by seven influential state supported temples, the so-called Nanto Shichi Daiji.[14] Octagonal structures such as the Hall of Dreams at Hōryū-ji built as memorial halls and storehouses exemplified by the Shōsōin first appeared during the Nara period.[8][16] Temple structures, such as pagodas and main halls, had increased significantly in size since the late 6th century. The placement of the pagoda moved to a more peripheral location and the roof bracketing system increased in complexity as roofs grew larger and heavier.[17]

The early Heian period (9th–10th century) saw an evolution of style based on the esoteric sects Tendai and Shingon, which were situated in mountainous areas. A new style termed 和様 (wayō?, Japanese style) emerged with the following characteristics: a main hall divided in two parts; an outer area for novices and an inner area for initiates; a hip-and-gable roof that covered both areas; a raised wooden floor instead of the tile or stone floors of earlier temples; extended eaves to cover the front steps; shingles or bark rather than tile roofing; and an adaption to the natural environment in contrast to symmetrical layouts.[10][18] The tahōtō, a two-storied tower with a resemblance to Indian stupas was also introduced by these sects during the Heian period.[19][20] According to an ancient Buddhist prophecy, the world would enter a dark period in 1051. During this period the Tendai sect believed enlightenment was possible only by the veneration of Amida Buddha. Consequently Paradise or Amida Halls—such as the Phoenix Hall at Byōdō-in (1053), the main hall of Jōruri-ji (1157) or the Golden Hall at Chūson-ji (1124)—were built by the imperial family or members of the aristocracy to recreate the western paradise of Amida on earth.[16][19][20][21][22][23][24][25] Halls that enshrined the nine statues of Amida[nb 2] were popular during the 12th century in the late Heian period. The main hall of Jōruri-ji is the only extant example of these halls.[16][26]

The Daibutsu style and the Zen style emerged in the late 12th or early 13th century. The Daibutsu or Great Buddha style, introduced by the priest Chogen, was based on Song Dynasty architecture and represented the antithesis of the wayō style. The Nandaimon at Tōdai-ji and the Amida Hall at Jōdo-ji are the only extant examples of this style.[10][27][28] Characteristics of the Zen style are earthen floors, subtly curved pent roofs (mokoshi) and pronouncedly curved main roofs, cusped windows and panelled doors.[27][29] Examples of this style include Butsuden at Kōzan-ji in Shimonoseki, Shakadō at Zenpuku-in and Octagonal Three-storied Pagoda at Anraku-ji.[30] The three Japanese styles, wayō, Daibutsu and Zen were combined in the Muromachi period giving rise to a conglomerate eclectic style represented by the main hall at Kakurin-ji.[10][29] By the end of the Muromachi period (late 16th century), Japanese Buddhist architecture had reached its apogee.[29] Construction methods had been perfected and building types conventionalized. Early pre-modern temples were saved from monotony by elaborate structural details, the use of undulating karahafu gables and monumental size of the buildings.[29] Representative examples for Momoyama (1568–1603) and Edo period (1603–1868) temple architecture are the Karamon at Hōgon-ji and the main hall of Kiyomizu-dera respectively.[29]

Statistics[edit]

Period National Treasures
Asuka period 5
Nara period 20
Heian period 20
Kamakura period 54
Muromachi period 30
Momoyama period 11
Edo period 13[nb 1]
Prefecture City National Treasures
Aichi Kira 1
Ehime Matsuyama 3
Fukui Obama 2
Fukushima Iwaki 1
Gifu Tajimi 2
Takayama 1
Hiroshima Fukuyama 2
Hiroshima 1
Onomichi 3
Hyōgo Kakogawa 2
Kasai 1
Katō 1
Kobe 1
Ono 1
Iwate Hiraizumi 1
Kagawa Mitoyo 1
Kanagawa Kamakura 1
Kōchi Ōtoyo 1
Kyoto Ayabe 1
Kizugawa 3
Kyoto 24
Uji 1
Miyagi Matsushima 2
Nagano Aoki 1
Nagano 1
Ueda 1
Nagasaki Nagasaki 2
Nara Gojō 1
Ikaruga 19
Ikoma 1
Katsuragi 3
Nara 29
Sakurai 1
Tenri 1
Uda 3
Yoshino 2
Ōita Bungotakada 1
Osaka Izumisano 1
Kaizuka 1
Kawachinagano 1
Shiga Aishō 1
Konan 4
Kōra 2
Nagahama 1
Ōtsu 4
Tochigi Ashikaga 1
Tokyo Higashimurayama 1
Toyama Takaoka 1[nb 1]
Wakayama Iwade 1
Kainan 4
Kōya 2
Yamagata Tsuruoka 1
Yamaguchi Shimonoseki 1
Yamaguchi 1
Yamanashi Kōshū 1
Yamanashi 1
Most national treasures are found in the Kansai region of Japan while some are also located in cities on Honshū, Kyushu and Shikoku.
Cities with National Treasures in the temple category


Usage[edit]

The table's columns (except for Remarks and Image) are sortable pressing the arrows symbols. The following gives an overview of what is included in the table and how the sorting works.

  • Name: name of the structure as registered in the Database of National Cultural Properties[5]
  • Temple: name of the temple in which the structure is located
  • Remarks: architecture and general remarks including
  • size measured in ken or distance between pillars; "m×n" denotes the length (m) and width (n) of the structure, each measured in ken
  • architectural style (zukuri) and type of roofing
  • Date: period and year; the column entries sort by year. If only a period is known, they sort by the start year of that period.
  • Location: "town-name prefecture-name, geocoordinates of the structure"; the column entries sort as "prefecture-name town-name".
  • Images: picture of the structure

Treasures[edit]

Name Temple Remarks Date Location Image
Golden Hall (金色堂 konjikidō?)[nb 3][26][31] Chūson-ji 3×3, 18 m (59 ft) square, single-storied, hōgyō style[ex 1] roof with wooden shingles of the hongawara type[ex 2] 1124late Heian period, 1124 Iwate HiraizumiHiraizumi, Iwate
39°0′4.94″N 141°5′59.61″E / 39.0013722°N 141.0998917°E / 39.0013722; 141.0998917
Interior of Konjikido, Chusonji (63).jpg
Priest's Quarters (庫裏 kuri?) and Corridors (廊下 rōka?)[nb 4][34] Zuigan-ji Kuri: 23.6 m × 13.8 m (77 ft × 45 ft), single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] entrance in the gable ends, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]

Corridors: between kuri and main hall (hondō), lengths: 2 ken (entrance hall), 6 ken (east corridor), 11 ken (middle corridor), 2 ken (west corridor); each is 1 ken wide, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4]

1609Momoyama period, 1609 Miyagi MatsushimaMatsushima, Miyagi
38°22′19.44″N 141°3′33.88″E / 38.3720667°N 141.0594111°E / 38.3720667; 141.0594111
A wooden building with white walls and large gabled roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 5][34] Zuigan-ji 13×8, 39.0 m × 25.2 m (128.0 ft × 82.7 ft), single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] and attached entrance hall 1609Momoyama period, 1609 Miyagi MatsushimaMatsushima, Miyagi
38°22′19.81″N 141°3′36.14″E / 38.3721694°N 141.0600389°E / 38.3721694; 141.0600389
A wooden building with slightly raised floor and wooden sliding doors.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[37][38][39] Three Mountains of Dewa 3×3, height: 29.0 m (95.1 ft), five-storied pagoda covered with hinoki cypress shingles 1372early Muromachi period, 1372 Yamagata TsuruokaTsuruoka, Yamagata A five-storied wooden pagoda in a forest.
Shiramizu Amidadō (白水阿弥陀堂?)[40] Ganjō-ji 3×3, single-storied, hōgyō style,[ex 1] tochibuki board roofing,[ex 5] temple hall containing an enshrined image of Amitabha 1160late Heian period, 1160 Fukushima IwakiIwaki, Fukushima
37°2′11.42″N 140°50′14.79″E / 37.0365056°N 140.8374417°E / 37.0365056; 140.8374417
A wooden building with pyramid shaped roof. Colorful flags are hanging around the outer walls.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[43] Banna-ji 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] front step canopy is 3 ken, nokikarahafu gable[ex 6], back canopy 1 ken, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1299Kamakura period, 1299 Tochigi AshikagaAshikaga, Tochigi
36°20′15.1″N 139°27′8.1″E / 36.337528°N 139.452250°E / 36.337528; 139.452250
A wooden building with a large irregularly shaped roof.
Jizō Hall (地蔵堂 jizōdō?)[nb 6][44] Shōfuku-ji 3×3, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] covered with hinoki cypress shingles, with a pent roof enclosure[ex 7] of copper-tile roofing, oldest intact building in Tokyo 1407middle Muromachi period, 1407 Tokyo HigashimurayamaHigashimurayama, Tokyo35°45′50.81″N 139°27′33.02″E / 35.7641139°N 139.4591722°E / 35.7641139; 139.4591722 Tall wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and a pent roof on all sides in the lower part.
Shariden (舎利殿?)[46] Engaku-ji 3×3 reliquary hall, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1450middle Muromachi period Kanagawa KamakuraKamakura, Kanagawa35°20′21.52″N 139°32′56.24″E / 35.3393111°N 139.5489556°E / 35.3393111; 139.5489556 A wooden building behind a roofed wall with a small Chinese style gate.
Buddha Hall (仏殿 butsuden?)[nb 7][nb 1][47] Zuiryū-ji (瑞龍寺?) 3×3 reliquary hall, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] lead plate roofing 1659early Edo period, 1659 Toyama TakaokaTakaoka, Toyama36°44′8.12″N 137°0′37.8″E / 36.7355889°N 137.010500°E / 36.7355889; 137.010500 Wooden building with a metal plate covered roof and an enclosing pent roof giving it the appearance of a two-storied structure.
Lecture Hall (法堂 hōdō, hattō?)[nb 1][48] Zuiryū-ji (瑞龍寺?) 11×9 main hall of worship, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a 2×1 step canopy and a karahafu gable,[ex 8] single-storied, copper plate roofing 1655early Edo period, 1655 Toyama TakaokaTakaoka, Toyama36°44′8.48″N 137°0′36.07″E / 36.7356889°N 137.0100194°E / 36.7356889; 137.0100194 Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and attached canopy with Chinese style gable. On either side, the building is connected to a wooden corridor.
Sanmon (山門?)[nb 1][nb 8][50] Zuiryū-ji (瑞龍寺?) two-storied sangen-ikko (三間一戸?) gate, irimoya style,[ex 4] covered with hinoki cypress shingles

includes two 3×1 stairway buildings (山廊 sanrō?) to either side of the gate: single-storied, kirizuma style[ex 3] with hinoki cypress shingles

1818late Edo period, 1818 Toyama TakaokaTakaoka, Toyama36°44′8″N 137°0′40.11″E / 36.73556°N 137.0111417°E / 36.73556; 137.0111417 Two-storied wooden gate with a hip-and-gable roof and a passage in the central bay.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[51] Myōtsū-ji 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1270early Kamakura period, 1270 Fukui ObamaObama, Fukui35°27′12.43″N 135°48′15.5″E / 35.4534528°N 135.804306°E / 35.4534528; 135.804306 A three-storied wooden pagoda in a forest.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[51] Myōtsū-ji 5×6, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1258early Kamakura period, 1258 Fukui ObamaObama, Fukui35°27′12.8″N 135°48′16″E / 35.453556°N 135.80444°E / 35.453556; 135.80444 A wooden building with slightly raised floor, a hip-and-gable roof and a canopy over the steps.
Buddha Hall (仏殿 butsuden?)[52] Seihaku-ji 3×3, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1415middle Muromachi period, 1415 Yamanashi YamanashiYamanashi, Yamanashi 35°41′37.5″N 138°42′28.94″E / 35.693750°N 138.7080389°E / 35.693750; 138.7080389 Front view of a wooden building with hip-and-gable roof and an enclosing pent roof.
Yakushi Hall (薬師堂 yakushidō?) or Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 9][53] Daizen-ji (大善寺?) 5×5, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles, characteristic for the eastern Japanese style 1286late Kamakura period, 1286 Yamanashi KōshūKōshū, Yamanashi35°39′25.84″N 138°44′34.86″E / 35.6571778°N 138.7430167°E / 35.6571778; 138.7430167 Wooden building with a hipped roof and an enclosing veranda without handrails.
Octagonal Three-storied Pagoda (八角三重塔 hakkaku sanjūnotō?)[nb 10][55] Anraku-ji three-storied octagonal pagoda, first roof is a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] covered with hinoki cypress shingles, only extant octagonal pagoda in Japan 1300late Kamakura period Nagano UedaUeda, Nagano36°21′8.62″N 138°9′8.2″E / 36.3523944°N 138.152278°E / 36.3523944; 138.152278 Wooden three-storied pagoda with octagonal floor plan and an additional enclosing pent roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 11][56] Zenkō-ji 14×5, single-storied with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] shumoku-zukuri (撞木造?), entrance in the gable ends, front step canopy is 3 ken, nokikarahafu gable;[ex 6] step canopies on either side are 1 ken, everything is covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1707middle Edo period, 1707 Nagano NaganoNagano, Nagano36°39′41.76″N 138°11′15.68″E / 36.6616000°N 138.1876889°E / 36.6616000; 138.1876889 A large wooden building with an added pent roof enclosure and a Chinese style gable.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?) Daihō-ji (大法寺?) 3×3, three-storied pagoda, covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1333early Muromachi period, 1333 Nagano AokiAoki, Nagano36°22′56.54″N 138°8′54.55″E / 36.3823722°N 138.1484861°E / 36.3823722; 138.1484861 Pagoda Daihoji Nagano.jpg
Scripture House (経蔵 kyōzō?) Ankoku-ji (安国寺?) Buddhist sutra storehouse, 1×1, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] covered with hinoki cypress shingles, includes an octagonal rotating sutra shelf (輪蔵 rinzō?) 1408middle Muromachi period, 1408 Gifu TakayamaTakayama, Gifu 国宝 安国寺経蔵.jpg
Kannon Hall (観音堂 kannondō?)[57] Eihō-ji 3×3, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1336early Muromachi period Gifu TajimiTajimi, Gifu35°20′47.08″N 137°7′48.57″E / 35.3464111°N 137.1301583°E / 35.3464111; 137.1301583 Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and a pent roof enclosure.
Founder's Hall (開山堂 kaisandō?)[nb 12][58] Eihō-ji worship hall (外陣 gejin?) 3×3 and inner sanctum (内陣 naijin?) 1×1 connected via an intermediate passage (相の間 ai no ma?); All structures are single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] and have hinoki cypress bark roofing. The naijin has a pent roof enclosure.[ex 7] 1336early Muromachi period Gifu TajimiTajimi, Gifu35°20′46.12″N 137°7′45.08″E / 35.3461444°N 137.1291889°E / 35.3461444; 137.1291889 Small wooden building with white walls and hip-and-gable roof connected to another wooden structure in the back.
Amida Hall (弥陀堂 amidadō?)[59] Konren-ji (金蓮寺?) 3×3, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hinoki cypress bark roofing 1300late Kamakura period Aichi KiraKira, Aichi A wooden building with a wide front veranda.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[nb 13][60] Mii-dera 7×7, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 3 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark roofing 1599Momoyama period, 1599 Shiga ŌtsuŌtsu, Shiga
35°0′48.25″N 135°51′10.3″E / 35.0134028°N 135.852861°E / 35.0134028; 135.852861
Wooden building with raised floor, a railed veranda and roofed stairs leading to the central entrance.
Konpon-chūdō (根本中堂?)[nb 14][61][62] Enryaku-ji 11×6, 37.6 m × 23.9 m (123 ft × 78 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] copper sheeting over wooden plannks with semi-circular battens covering the seams; main hall originally founded in 788 by Dengyō Daishi with an "Inextinguishable Dharma Light" burining inside in front of the Yakushi Nyorai (Medicine Buddha). part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1640early Edo period, 1640 Shiga ŌtsuŌtsu, Shiga35°4′13.64″N 135°50′27.39″E / 35.0704556°N 135.8409417°E / 35.0704556; 135.8409417 A building with large hip-and-gable roof beyond a roofed enclosure.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 15][63] Kongōrin-ji (金剛輪寺?) 7×7, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles 1336early Muromachi period Shiga AishōAishō, Shiga
35°9′40.57″N 136°16′58.95″E / 35.1612694°N 136.2830417°E / 35.1612694; 136.2830417
Wooden building with hip-and-gable roof, white walls and light colored wooden beams.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[nb 16][64] Jōraku-ji (常楽寺?) 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1400middle Muromachi period, 1400 Shiga KonanKonan, Shiga
34°59′25.09″N 136°2′57.22″E / 34.9903028°N 136.0492278°E / 34.9903028; 136.0492278
Wooden three-storied pagoda at the top of a long flight of stairs.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 17][64] Jōraku-ji (常楽寺?) 7×6, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 3 ken step canopy and hinoki cypress bark roofing 1360early Muromachi period, 1360 Shiga KonanKonan, Shiga
34°59′24.48″N 136°2′54.7″E / 34.9901333°N 136.048528°E / 34.9901333; 136.048528
Wooden building with slightly raised floor, a step canopy and a railed veranda.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[65][66] Saimyō-ji (西明寺?) 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1300late Kamakura period Shiga KōraKōra, Shiga
35°10′58.83″N 136°17′6.82″E / 35.1830083°N 136.2852278°E / 35.1830083; 136.2852278
Saimyoji Kora Shiga pref16bs3900.jpg
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[65][67] Saimyō-ji (西明寺?) 7×7, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 3 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1185early Kamakura period Shiga KōraKōra, Shiga
35°10′59.63″N 136°17′7.63″E / 35.1832306°N 136.2854528°E / 35.1832306; 136.2854528
Saimyoji Kora Shiga pref12bs4592.jpg
Tahōtō (多宝塔?)[nb 18][68] Ishiyama-dera 3×3, two-storied Buddhist tower with a pent roof, square base and round top, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1194early Kamakura period, 1194 Shiga ŌtsuŌtsu, Shiga34°57′39.48″N 135°54′21.43″E / 34.9609667°N 135.9059528°E / 34.9609667; 135.9059528 A wooden two-storied pagoda with a square base, round top and a pyramid shaped roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[68] Ishiyama-dera Hon-dō: 7×4,
Ai-no-ma: 1×7,
Worship hall (礼堂 rai-dō?): 9×4, overhang style (懸造 kake-zukuri?),
rai-dō and hon-dō are in yosemune style[ex 9] and connected via the roof of the ai-no-ma, each of the three structures is covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles
1096late Heian period, 1096 Shiga ŌtsuŌtsu, Shiga34°57′37.66″N 135°54′20.26″E / 34.9604611°N 135.9056278°E / 34.9604611; 135.9056278 A wooden building with enclosing veranda built on tall wooden pillars.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 9][69] Zensui-ji (善水寺?) 7×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1366early Muromachi period, 1366 Shiga KonanKonan, Shiga35°0′23.2″N 136°6′45.2″E / 35.006444°N 136.112556°E / 35.006444; 136.112556 Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and an enclosing veranda.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 9][70] Chōju-ji (長寿寺?) 5×5, single-storied, yosemune style[ex 9] with a 3 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1185early Kamakura period Shiga KonanKonan, Shiga34°59′7.17″N 136°3′35.62″E / 34.9853250°N 136.0598944°E / 34.9853250; 136.0598944 Wooden building with a hipped roof, slightly raised floor, an enclosing veranda and a wide central staircase on the front.
Karamon (唐門?)[nb 6][29][71] Hōgon-ji (宝厳寺?) four-legged gate[ex 10] with karahafu gables[ex 8] over the front and back entrance, 3.3 m × 6.1 m (11 ft × 20 ft), hinoki cypress bark shingles; entrance to the Kannon hall 1603Momoyama period, 1603 Shiga NagahamaNagahama, Shiga 35°25′14.04″N 136°8′37.63″E / 35.4205667°N 136.1437861°E / 35.4205667; 136.1437861 (Karamon, Hogon-ji) A gate with a large undulating Chinese style gable over the entrance.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[73] Kaijūsen-ji (海住山寺?) 3×3, five-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] first roof is a pent roof enclosure[ex 7] of copper-tile roofing 1214early Kamakura period, 1214 Kyoto KizugawaKizugawa, Kyoto
34°46′36.33″N 135°51′43.33″E / 34.7767583°N 135.8620361°E / 34.7767583; 135.8620361
A five-storied pagoda with vermillion red beams and greenish roof. Just below the first-story roof there is an additional pent roof.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[nb 6][74] Tō-ji 5×3, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1603Momoyama period, 1603 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°58′49.32″N 135°44′51.67″E / 34.9803667°N 135.7476861°E / 34.9803667; 135.7476861 Large wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and enclosing pent roof.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[75] Tō-ji 3×3, five-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] at 54.8 m (180 ft) highest wooden pagoda in Japan, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1643early Edo period, 1643 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°58′47.59″N 135°44′55.34″E / 34.9798861°N 135.7487056°E / 34.9798861; 135.7487056 Toji-temple-kyoto.jpg
Daishi Hall (大師堂 daishidō?) or Miei Hall (御影堂 mieidō?) (west section): ushiro-dō (後堂?), mae-dō (前堂?) and chūmon (中門?)[nb 19][76] Tō-ji ushiro-dō: 7×4, irimoya style,[ex 4]ken hisashi on the north-western end, 1 ken step canopy on the east side

mae-dō: 4×5, north side irimoya style,[ex 4] connected to the ushiro-dō in the south
chūmon: 2×1, west side kirizuma style,[ex 3] connected to the mae-dō in the east
All three structures are single-storied. part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)

1380early Muromachi period, 1380 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°58′53.91″N 135°44′48.45″E / 34.9816417°N 135.7467917°E / 34.9816417; 135.7467917 Wooden building with railed veranda, white walls and a hip-and-gable roof.
Lotus Flower Gate (蓮花門 rengemon?) Tō-ji eight-legged gate,[ex 11] kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1185early Kamakura period Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°58′50.44″N 135°44′46.73″E / 34.9806778°N 135.7463139°E / 34.9806778; 135.7463139 Wooden gate with gabled roof and white walls beyond a pond.
Niōmon (二王門 niōmon?)[78] Kōmyō-ji (光明寺?) two-storied sangen-ikko (三間一戸?) gate, irimoya style,[ex 4] tochibuki board roofing[ex 5] 1248early Kamakura period, 1248 Kyoto AyabeAyabe, Kyoto A two-storied gate with vermillion red beams.
Keigū-in Main Hall (桂宮院本堂 keigu-in hondō?)[nb 9][79] Kōryū-ji octagonal hall, single-storied, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1251early Kamakura period, before 1251 Kyoto KyotoKyoto, Kyoto
35°0′54.1″N 135°42′19.53″E / 35.015028°N 135.7054250°E / 35.015028; 135.7054250
Sekisui-in (石水院?)[nb 5] Kōzan-ji (3 (front) or 4 (back))x3, with a 1 ken hisashi on the front side, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] entrance on gable ends, hinoki cypress shingles 1185early Kamakura period Kyoto KyotoKyoto, Kyoto35°3′36.48″N 135°40′42.72″E / 35.0601333°N 135.6785333°E / 35.0601333; 135.6785333 Room with wooden floor open on two sides. There is a small statue placed in the center of the room.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[80] Jōruri-ji 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1178late Heian period, before 1178 Kyoto KizugawaKizugawa, Kyoto34°42′56.34″N 135°52′24.94″E / 34.7156500°N 135.8735944°E / 34.7156500; 135.8735944 Wooden pagoda with white walls and vermillion red beams.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[16][80] Jōruri-ji 11×4, 33.8 m × 16.5 m (111 ft × 54 ft), yosemune style[ex 9] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1157late Heian period, 1157 Kyoto KizugawaKizugawa, Kyoto34°42′56.81″N 135°52′21.49″E / 34.7157806°N 135.8726361°E / 34.7157806; 135.8726361 Low and wide building with hipped roof, white walls, beyond a lake.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[81] Ninna-ji 7×5, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1613Momoyama period, 1613 Kyoto KyotoKyoto35°1′51.88″N 135°42′49.72″E / 35.0310778°N 135.7138111°E / 35.0310778; 135.7138111 Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof, an enclosing veranda and metal ornaments.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 20][29][82] Kiyomizu-dera 9×7, 33.5 m × 33.2 m (110 ft × 109 ft), single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] pent roof enclosure[ex 7] on east, north and west side, hinoki cypress bark shingles, includes a stage, temple is part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1633early Edo period, 1633 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°59′41.4″N 135°47′5.83″E / 34.994833°N 135.7849528°E / 34.994833; 135.7849528 Wooden building with large hipped roof constructed on long poles.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 21][83] Daisen-in (Daitoku-ji) 14.8 m × 10.8 m (49 ft × 35 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] copper-tile roofing 1513late Muromachi period, 1513 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°2′40.37″N 135°44′44.72″E / 35.0445472°N 135.7457556°E / 35.0445472; 135.7457556
A wall with window and a raked stone garden.
Hōjō (方丈?) with Entrance (玄関 genkan?)[nb 5][84] Ryōgen-in (Daitoku-ji) Hōjō: 29.8 m × 17.0 m (97.8 ft × 55.8 ft), single-storied, 'irimoya style,[ex 4] sangawarabuki tile roof,[ex 12] connected to the (雲門庵?) at the back;

Entrance: 6×1, single-storied, karahafu gable,[ex 8] sangawarabuki tile roof;[ex 12]
residence of the head priest. Hōjō meditation hall was built in 1502.

1635early Edo period, 1635, (entrance from 1636) Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°2′31.58″N 135°44′45.7″E / 35.0421056°N 135.746028°E / 35.0421056; 135.746028
A roofed enclosing veranda of a wooden building with white walls.
Karamon (唐門?) Daitoku-ji four-legged gate,[ex 10] kirizuma style,[ex 3] nokikarahafu gable[ex 6] on front and back, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1568Momoyama period Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°2′37.51″N 135°44′47.14″E / 35.0437528°N 135.7464278°E / 35.0437528; 135.7464278
Karamon of Daitokuji (119).jpg
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?) or Senbon Shakadō (千本釈迦堂?)[nb 22][86] Daihōon-ji (大報恩寺?) 5×6, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1227early Kamakura period, 1227 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°1′54.68″N 135°44′23.44″E / 35.0318556°N 135.7398444°E / 35.0318556; 135.7398444
Wooden building with a step canopy.
Golden Hall (金堂 kondō?)[nb 6][87][88] Daigo-ji 7×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] principal hall relocated from Yuasa, Wakayama which was completed in 1600. part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1100late Heian period Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°57′5.33″N 135°49′18.29″E / 34.9514806°N 135.8217472°E / 34.9514806; 135.8217472 Wooden building with hip-and-gable roof, white walls, vermillionred beams and an open veranda.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[87][88] Daigo-ji 3×3, five-storied pagoda, height: 38 m (125 ft) including the 13 m (43 ft) finial, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 0952middle Heian period, 952 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°57′2.1″N 135°49′19.67″E / 34.950583°N 135.8221306°E / 34.950583; 135.8221306 Five-storied wooden pagoda with white walls and vermillion red beams.
Yakushi Hall (薬師堂 yakushidō?)[89] Daigo-ji (Upper Daigo (上醍醐 kamidaigo?)) 5×4, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress bark shingles, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1121late Heian period, 1121 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°56′44.25″N 135°50′19.46″E / 34.9456250°N 135.8387389°E / 34.9456250; 135.8387389
Wooden building on a stone platform with white walls.
Sanmon (三門?)[4][90] Chion-in large 5 ken or 50 m (160 ft) wide, 24 m (79 ft) high two-storied gate with entrances in the three central bays, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]

includes two 3×2 stairway buildings (山廊 sanrō?) to either side of the gate: single-storied, kirizuma style[ex 3] with hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] largest extant two-storied, double-roofed gate

1621early Edo period, 1621 Kyoto KyotoKyoto35°0′17.28″N 135°46′54.5″E / 35.0048000°N 135.781806°E / 35.0048000; 135.781806 A large two-storied wooden gate with a veranda on the upper story and a hip-and-gable style roof. A small wooden building with gabled roof is placed next to it.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?) or Miei Hall (御影堂 mieidō?)[nb 23][90] Chion-in 11×9, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 5 ken step canopy at the front and a 3 ken step canopy at the back 1639early Edo period, 1639 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°0′18.86″N 135°47′0.19″E / 35.0052389°N 135.7833861°E / 35.0052389; 135.7833861
Large wooden building with raised floor, enclosing veranda, white walls and a hip-and-gable roof.
Sanmon (三門?)[91] Tōfuku-ji large 5 ken, 22 m (72 ft) high two-storied gate with entrances in the three central bays, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]
includes two stairway buildings (山廊 sanrō?) to either side of the gate: single-storied, kirizuma style[ex 3] with hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]
, oldest Zen main gate in Japan
1405middle Muromachi period, 1405 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°58′32.53″N 135°46′25.47″E / 34.9757028°N 135.7737417°E / 34.9757028; 135.7737417
A large two-storied wooden gate with white walls, a veranda on the upper story and a hip-and-gable style roof. Two small wooden open structures with gabled roofs are placed next to it on either side.
Hōjō (方丈?)[92] Nanzen-ji ōhōjō (大方丈?): irimoya style[ex 4]

ōhōjō ( 小方 丈?): back side with a kirizuma style[ex 3] gable, front connected to the ōhōjō
both structures are single-storied and covered with hinoki cypress shingles; residence of the head priest

1573middle Momoyama period, 1573–1591 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
35°0′41.09″N 135°47′40.06″E / 35.0114139°N 135.7944611°E / 35.0114139; 135.7944611
A wooden building with roofed veranda next to a raked gravel garden.
Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 hōōdō?): central hall (中堂 chū-dō?), wing corridors (両翼廊 ryōyokurō?), (尾廊?)[nb 24][93] Byōdō-in central hall: 3×2, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]

wing corridors: 8×1 (with bends), single storied with an upper floor, kirizuma style;[ex 3] corner towers are two-storied with three floors, hōgyō style,[ex 1] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]
尾 廊: 7×1, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]
main temple building, depicted on the 10 yen coin, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)

1053middle Heian period, 1053 Kyoto UjiUji, Kyoto34°53′21.49″N 135°48′27.6″E / 34.8893028°N 135.807667°E / 34.8893028; 135.807667 Wide wooden building on an island consisting of a central structure connected on either side to open corridors with towers at the end.
Amida Hall (阿弥陀堂 amidadō?) Hōkai-ji (法界寺?) 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hōgyō style,[ex 1] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1185early Kamakura period Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°56′2.91″N 135°48′53.61″E / 34.9341417°N 135.8148917°E / 34.9341417; 135.8148917
Wooden building with slightly raised floor, an open veranda and a pyramid shaped roof.
Karamon (唐門?)[94] Nishi Honganji four-legged gate[ex 10] with karahafu gables[ex 8] on the front and back, sides are irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress bark shingles, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) 1573Momoyama period, 1573–1614 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°59′25.31″N 135°45′3.93″E / 34.9903639°N 135.7510917°E / 34.9903639; 135.7510917
Black wooden gate with colorful ornamentation and a Chinese style gable on the front.
Priest's Quarters (庫裏 kuri?) Myōhō-in (妙法院?) 21.8 m × 23.7 m (72 ft × 78 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] entrance in gable ends, 1 ken entrance hall with karahafu gable,[ex 8] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] hisashi in the north 1573Momoyama period, 1573–1614 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°59′25.41″N 135°46′30.71″E / 34.9903917°N 135.7751972°E / 34.9903917; 135.7751972
Wooden building with white walls and hip-and-gable style roof.
Hōjō (方丈?)[nb 25][91] Ryōginan (竜吟庵?) (Tōfuku-ji) 16.5 m × 12.9 m (54 ft × 42 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress shingles, residence of the head priest 1387early Muromachi period, 1387 Kyoto KyotoKyoto
34°58′38.79″N 135°46′29.44″E / 34.9774417°N 135.7748444°E / 34.9774417; 135.7748444
Wooden building with an open veranda next to a raked gravel garden.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 6][95] Sanjūsangen-dō 35×5, single-storied, kirizuma style[ex 3] with a 7 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1266Kamakura period, 1266 Kyoto KyotoKyoto34°59′16.12″N 135°46′18.15″E / 34.9878111°N 135.7717083°E / 34.9878111; 135.7717083 A very long wooden building with open veranda and slightly raised roof.
Golden Hall (金堂 kondō?)[nb 6][96] Kanshin-ji (観心寺?) 7×7, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 3 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] principal hall 1346early Muromachi period, Shōhei era Osaka KawachinaganoKawachinagano, Osaka
34°26′14.48″N 135°35′54.8″E / 34.4373556°N 135.598556°E / 34.4373556; 135.598556
Wooden building with raised floor, white walls, vermillion red beams, an open veranda and a hip-and-gable roof.
Kannon Hall (観音堂 kannondō?) Kōon-ji (孝恩寺?) 5×5, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1300late Kamakura period, 1300 Osaka KaizukaKaizuka, Osaka
34°23′49.85″N 135°23′40.21″E / 34.3971806°N 135.3945028°E / 34.3971806; 135.3945028
Wooden building with raised floor, white walls and a tile roof.
Tahōtō (多宝塔?)[nb 26][97] Jigen-in (慈眼院?) 3×3, two-storied Buddhist tower (tahōtō), hinoki cypress bark shingles 1271early Kamakura period, 1271 Osaka IzumisanoIzumisano, Osaka Two-storied wooden pagoda with a square lower and a round upper floor.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[98] Ichijō-ji 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1171late Heian period, 1171 Hyōgo KasaiKasai, Hyōgo34°51′32.28″N 134°49′8.46″E / 34.8589667°N 134.8190167°E / 34.8589667; 134.8190167 Three-storied wooden pagoda on a hillside.
Jōdo Hall (浄土堂 jōdodō?) or Amida Hall (阿弥陀堂 amidadō?)[27][99] Jōdo-ji 3×3, 18 m (59 ft) squared, single-storied, hōgyō style,[ex 1] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1192early Kamakura period, 1192 Hyōgo OnoOno, Hyōgo34°51′51.27″N 134°57′39.89″E / 34.8642417°N 134.9610806°E / 34.8642417; 134.9610806 Wooden building with slightly raised floor, open veranda, red beams, white walls and a pyramid shaped roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[100] Taisan-ji 7×6, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] gable roof covered with copper 1285late Kamakura period, 1285 Hyōgo KobeKobe, Hyōgo
34°41′47.73″N 135°4′2.81″E / 34.6965917°N 135.0674472°E / 34.6965917; 135.0674472
Wooden building with white walls, vermillion red beams, slightly raised floor and a hip-and-gable roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 27] Chōkō-ji 7×7, single-storied, yosemune style[ex 9] with a 3 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1413middle Muromachi period, 1413–1428 Hyōgo KatoKatō, Hyōgo34°55′56.86″N 135°2′37.86″E / 34.9324611°N 135.0438500°E / 34.9324611; 135.0438500 Wooden building with raised floor and a wide staircase.
Taishidō (太子堂?)[101] Kakurin-ji 3×3, single-storied, hōgyō style,[ex 1] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1112late Heian period, 1112 Hyōgo KakogawaKakogawa, Hyōgo
34°45′7.66″N 134°49′58.14″E / 34.7521278°N 134.8328167°E / 34.7521278; 134.8328167
Wooden building with a pyramid shaped roof and an open veranda on the fron. A stair leads at one end of the veranda to the building's level.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 5][29][101] Kakurin-ji 7×6, 17 m × 15.2 m (56 ft × 50 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1397middle Muromachi period, 1397 Hyōgo KakogawaKakogawa, Hyōgo
34°45′8.18″N 134°49′57.29″E / 34.7522722°N 134.8325806°E / 34.7522722; 134.8325806
Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof an a central staircase leading to the raised floor level.
Small Five-storied Pagoda (五重小塔 gojū-no-shōtō?)[nb 28][102] Kairyūō-ji (海龍王寺?) 3×3, 4.0 m (13.1 ft) high miniature pagoda, wooden hongawarabuki shaped roof[ex 2] 0729Nara period, Tenpyō era Nara NaraNara, Nara Wooden miniature pagoda with white walls and vermillion red beams.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[103][104] Kōfuku-ji 3×3, five-storied pagoda, second highest pagoda in Japan at 50.1 m (164 ft), hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] restoration from 1426 of an original pagoda from 730, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1426middle Muromachi period, 1426 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′56.92″N 135°49′56.03″E / 34.6824778°N 135.8322306°E / 34.6824778; 135.8322306 Wooden five-storied pagoda with white walls.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[103][105] Kōfuku-ji 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] reconstruction from the beginning of the Kamakura period of an original pagoda from 1143, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1185early Kamakura period Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′56.11″N 135°49′46.89″E / 34.6822528°N 135.8296917°E / 34.6822528; 135.8296917 Three-storied wooden pagoda.
Eastern Golden Hall (東金堂 tōkondō?)[103][106] Kōfuku-ji 7×4, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] the remaining of the three golden halls, reconstruction from 1415 of an original structure from 726, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1425middle Muromachi period, 1425 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′58.42″N 135°49′56.01″E / 34.6828944°N 135.8322250°E / 34.6828944; 135.8322250 Wooden building with white walls and a trapezoidal roof.
North Octagonal Hall (北円堂 hokuendō?)[nb 29][103][107] Kōfuku-ji octagonal hall, single-storied, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] reconstruction from 1426 of an original hall built in 721 to honor the first anniversary of the death of Fujiwara no Fuhito, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1210early Kamakura period, 1210 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′0.42″N 135°49′47.76″E / 34.6834500°N 135.8299333°E / 34.6834500; 135.8299333 Small octagonal wooden building with white walls and red beams.
Niō Gate (二王門 niōmon?)[nb 30] Kinpusen-ji two-storied sangen-ikko (三間一戸?) gate, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1456middle Muromachi period, 1456 Nara YoshinoYoshino, Nara A two-storied wooden gate with white walls and faded red colored beams. There are two guardian statues in the side bays of the lower floor.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?) or Zaō Hall (蔵王堂 zaōdō?) Kinpusen-ji 5×6, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1591Momoyama period, 1591 Nara YoshinoYoshino, Nara Large wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and an enclosing pent roof. There is a railed open veranda above the pent roof.
Small Five-storied Pagoda (五重小塔 gojū-no-shōtō?)[14][108] Gangō-ji Gokurakubō (元興寺極楽坊?) 3×3, 5.5 m (18 ft) tall miniature pagoda, wooden hongawarabuki shaped roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0775Nara period, late 8th century Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′39.07″N 135°49′52.84″E / 34.6775194°N 135.8313444°E / 34.6775194; 135.8313444 Wooden miniature five-storied pagoda with white walls.
Zen Room (禅室 zenshitsu?)[14][109] Gangō-ji Gokurakubō (元興寺極楽坊?) 4×4, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] with smooth, lipless, semi-cylindrical cover tiles (行基葺, gyōgibuki);[110] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara, contains lumber used in the construction of Asuka-dera, one of the first Buddhist temples in Japan 1185early Kamakura period Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′40.65″N 135°49′51.59″E / 34.6779583°N 135.8309972°E / 34.6779583; 135.8309972 Long wooden building with white walls.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?),[nb 31][109] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara Gangō-ji Gokurakubō (元興寺極楽坊?) 6×6, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] entrance in gable ends, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] with smooth, lipless, semi-cylindrical cover tiles (行基葺, gyōgibuki),[110]ken wide open veranda on the front side, contains an akadana (閼伽棚?) 1244early Kamakura period, 1244 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′40.57″N 135°49′52.7″E / 34.6779361°N 135.831306°E / 34.6779361; 135.831306 Wooden building with pyramid shaped roof and white walls.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[111] Murō-ji 5×5, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hinoki cypress shingles; principal hall 0794early Heian period Nara UdaUda, Nara Wooden building. In front of the entrance there is an open veranda consturcted on poles.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[112] Murō-ji 3×3, five-storied pagoda, hinoki cypress bark shingles 0794early Heian period Nara UdaUda, Nara Wooden five-storied pagoda with white walls and red beams.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?) or Kanjō Hall (灌頂堂 kanjōdō?)[nb 32][113] Murō-ji 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1308late Kamakura period, 1308 Nara UdaUda, Nara Wooden building with open railed veranda and slightly raised floor.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?) Akishinodera (秋篠寺?) 5×4, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1185early Kamakura period Nara NaraNara, Nara
34°42′13.57″N 135°46′34.28″E / 34.7037694°N 135.7761889°E / 34.7037694; 135.7761889
Wooden building on a stone platform with white walls.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[114] Jūrin-in (十輪院?) 5×4, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1185early Kamakura period Nara NaraNara, Nara
34°40′35.08″N 135°49′59.48″E / 34.6764111°N 135.8331889°E / 34.6764111; 135.8331889
Small wooden building with white walls.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[14][115] Shin-Yakushi-ji 7×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 0747Nara period, 747 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′33.35″N 135°50′46.19″E / 34.6759306°N 135.8461639°E / 34.6759306; 135.8461639 Low and wide wooden building with white walls.
Shōsōin[16][116] Tōdai-ji treasure house, oldest surviving example of the azekura log-cabin style with a raised floor, 9×3, 108.4 m × 30.5 m (356 ft × 100 ft), single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 0756Nara period, ca. 756 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′31.11″N 135°50′18.84″E / 34.6919750°N 135.8385667°E / 34.6919750; 135.8385667 Dark wooden building with raised floor on poles.
Oratory (拝殿 haiden?)[nb 33][117] Isonokami Shrine 7×4, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1185early Kamakura period Nara TenriTenri, Nara34°35′52.13″N 135°51′7.17″E / 34.5978139°N 135.8519917°E / 34.5978139; 135.8519917 Wooden building with raised floor, vermillion red beams and railed open veranda.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 34][118] Chōkyū-ji (長弓寺?) 5×6, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1279late Kamakura period, 1279 Nara IkomaIkoma, Nara
34°43′6.92″N 135°43′38.28″E / 34.7185889°N 135.7273000°E / 34.7185889; 135.7273000
Wooden building with a raised floor, a hip-and-gable roof and an enclosing open railed veranda.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 35][119] Hase-dera Worship Hall (正堂 shōdō?): 7×4, with a pent roof [ex 7] on the front and either side

Ai-no-ma and Worship Hall (礼堂 raidō?): 4×9, overhang style, entrance in gable ends, connected to the shōdō in the back side, chidori hafu bargeboards[ex 13] on either side, attached to a stage on the front side, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2]
each structure is single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4]

1650early Edo period, 1650 Nara SakuraiSakurai, Nara34°32′9.27″N 135°54′24.51″E / 34.5359083°N 135.9068083°E / 34.5359083; 135.9068083 Wooden building with a large hip-and-gable roof built on a hillside. In front of the building there is a wooden railed platform.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[nb 36][16][121] Tōshōdai-ji 7×4, 27.9 m × 14.6 m (92 ft × 48 ft), single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] principal hall, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0710Nara period, 8th century Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′32.23″N 135°47′5.43″E / 34.6756194°N 135.7848417°E / 34.6756194; 135.7848417 Wooden building with white walls built on a stone platform.
Scripture House (経蔵 kyōzō?)[122] Tōshōdai-ji Buddhist sutra storehouse, 3×3, storehouse style (校倉 azekura?), yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0710Nara period, 8th century Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′32.22″N 135°47′7.9″E / 34.6756167°N 135.785528°E / 34.6756167; 135.785528 Small and dark wooden building with raised floor on poles.
Korō (鼓楼?)[nb 9][123] Tōshōdai-ji 3×2, style,[ex 14] irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] with a drum for indicating the time, also served as a sutra repository, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1240early Kamakura period, 1240 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′33.05″N 135°47′6.25″E / 34.6758472°N 135.7850694°E / 34.6758472; 135.7850694 Wooden building with white walls and a veranda with balustrade on the upper floor.
Lecture Hall (講堂 kōdō?)[nb 37][14][125] Tōshōdai-ji 9×4, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] originally part of the Heijō Palace; now part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0763Nara period, 763 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′33.36″N 135°47′5.43″E / 34.6759333°N 135.7848417°E / 34.6759333; 135.7848417 Wooden building with white walls and a hip-and-gable roof built on a stone platform.
Treasure House (宝蔵 hōzō?)[126] Tōshōdai-ji 3×3, storehouse style (校倉 azekura?), yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0710Nara period Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′32.91″N 135°47′7.91″E / 34.6758083°N 135.7855306°E / 34.6758083; 135.7855306 Small and dark wooden building with raised floor on poles.
Founder's Hall (開山堂 kaizandō?)[nb 38][127] Tōdai-ji 3×3, single-storied, hōgyō style,[ex 1] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1200early Kamakura period, 1200 (inner temple), 1250 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′20.65″N 135°50′36.56″E / 34.6890694°N 135.8434889°E / 34.6890694; 135.8434889 Wooden building with pyramid shaped roof.
Golden Hall (金堂 kondō?) or Great Buddha Hall (大仏殿 daibutsuden?)[nb 6][29][128] Tōdai-ji 5×5, 57 m × 50 m (187 ft × 164 ft), single-storied, yosemune style[ex 9] with a pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] karahafu gable[ex 8] on front side, copper-tile roofing; largest wooden building in the world, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1705middle Edo period, 1705 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′20.37″N 135°50′23.36″E / 34.6889917°N 135.8398222°E / 34.6889917; 135.8398222 Huge wooden building with white walls and dark beams.
Belfry (鐘楼 shōrō?)[nb 6][27] Tōdai-ji 1×1, 7.6 m (25 ft) square, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1207early Kamakura period, Jōgen era Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′19.81″N 135°50′31.33″E / 34.6888361°N 135.8420361°E / 34.6888361; 135.8420361 Small wooden house with a hip-and gable roof. The structure is open from all sides and a large bell is hanging in the center.
Tegaimon (転害門?)[129] Tōdai-ji ken wide eight-legged gate[ex 11] with a 1 ken passage, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0757Nara period, around Tenpyō-hōji era Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′29.84″N 135°50′6.29″E / 34.6916222°N 135.8350806°E / 34.6916222; 135.8350806 Low and wide wooden gate with white walls and a gabled roof.
Nandaimon (南大門?)[27][130] Tōdai-ji large 5×2, 29 m × 11 m (95 ft × 36 ft), two-storied gate with entrances in the three central baysgate, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1199early Kamakura period, 1199 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′8.83″N 135°50′23.51″E / 34.6857861°N 135.8398639°E / 34.6857861; 135.8398639 Large two-storied wooden gate with a hip-and-gable roof and passages in the three central bays.
Nigatsu-dō (二月堂?)[131] Tōdai-ji overhang style, 10×7, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1669middle Edo period, 1669 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′21.39″N 135°50′39.33″E / 34.6892750°N 135.8442583°E / 34.6892750; 135.8442583 Large wooden building with a pyramid shaped roof. Built on a hill slope with part of the building and veranda supported by poles.
Hokke-dō (法華堂?) or Sangatsu-dō (三月堂?)[nb 6][132] Tōdai-ji front 5 ken, side 8 ken, front irimoya style,[ex 4] back yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] contains akadana (閼伽棚?); part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0747Nara period, 747 (image hall (正堂 shōdō?)) and 1199 (worship hall (礼堂 raidō?)) Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′19.43″N 135°50′38.54″E / 34.6887306°N 135.8440389°E / 34.6887306; 135.8440389 Wooden building with white walls, a raised floor with railed veranda and a hip-and-gable roof.
Scripture House (本坊経庫 honbōkyōko?) Tōdai-ji Buddhist sutra storehouse, 3×2, storehouse style (校倉 azekura?), yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0710Nara period Nara NaraNara, Nara
34°41′9.33″N 135°50′26.04″E / 34.6859250°N 135.8405667°E / 34.6859250; 135.8405667
Honbokyoko Todaiji.jpg
Rōmon (楼門?) Hannya-ji (般若寺?) 1×1, two-storied gate, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1264early Kamakura period, around Bun'ei era Nara NaraNara, Nara34°41′59.5″N 135°50′8″E / 34.699861°N 135.83556°E / 34.699861; 135.83556 Small, high wooden gate with a railed veranda on the upper floor and a hip-and-gable roof.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[133] Hokki-ji 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0706Asuka period, 706 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°37′22.41″N 135°44′46.71″E / 34.6228917°N 135.7463083°E / 34.6228917; 135.7463083 Wooden three-storied pagoda with white walls and railed verandas on the upper floors.
East Corridor (東廻廊 higashi kairō?) and West Corridor (西廻廊 nishi kairō?)[134] Hōryū-ji 42 ken (east corridor) and 40 ken (west corridor) long (with bends), single-storied, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0700Asuka period, ca. 700 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara

34°36′51.71″N 135°44′5.1″E / 34.6143639°N 135.734750°E / 34.6143639; 135.734750
34°36′51.2″N 135°44′1.71″E / 34.614222°N 135.7338083°E / 34.614222; 135.7338083

A semi-open wooden corridor with white walls.

A semi-open wooden corridor with white walls.

Golden Hall (金堂 kondō?)[nb 39][1][8][14] Hōryū-ji 5×4, double-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with pent roof enclosure[ex 7] on first floor, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] wood shingles (pent roof); together with Hōryū-ji's five-storied pagoda one of the oldest wooden buildings in the world, principal hall, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0693Asuka period, by 693 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.54″N 135°44′4.05″E / 34.6143167°N 135.7344583°E / 34.6143167; 135.7344583 Large wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof, two enclosing pent roofs and an open gallery with handrail on the upper floor.
Scripture House (経蔵 kyōzō?)[135] Hōryū-ji Buddhist sutra storehouse, 3×2, style,[ex 14] kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0710Nara period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′52.52″N 135°44′1.82″E / 34.6145889°N 135.7338389°E / 34.6145889; 135.7338389 Two-storied wooden building with white walls and an attached open veranda with handrail on the upper floor.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[2][14][136] Hōryū-ji 3×3, five-storied pagoda with a pent roof enclosure[ex 7] on the first level, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] wood shingles (pent roof); together with Hōryū-ji's kon-dō one of the oldest wooden buildings in the world, at 50 m (160 ft) second tallest pagoda in Japan, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0703Asuka period, ca. 703 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.38″N 135°44′2.81″E / 34.6142722°N 135.7341139°E / 34.6142722; 135.7341139 Wooden five-storied pagoda with white walls. Below the first roof, there is an additional attached pent roof.
Kōfūzō (綱封蔵?)[137] Hōryū-ji large storehouse, 9×3, single-storied, raised floor, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0794early Heian period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.98″N 135°44′7.54″E / 34.6144389°N 135.7354278°E / 34.6144389; 135.7354278 Wooden building with white walls on poles.
Three Sutra Hall (三経院 sankyōin?) and West Dormitory (西室 nishimuro?)[nb 6][138] Hōryū-ji 19×(5 (front) or 4 (back)), single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] entrance in gable ends, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] attached hisashi in front, with a 1 ken step canopy covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles; part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1231early Kamakura period, 1231 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.17″N 135°44′0.33″E / 34.6142139°N 135.7334250°E / 34.6142139; 135.7334250 Long wooden building with an open veranda with handrail.
Belfry (鐘楼 shōrō?)[139] Hōryū-ji 3×2, style,[ex 14] kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1005middle Heian period, 1005–1020 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′52.87″N 135°44′4.52″E / 34.6146861°N 135.7345889°E / 34.6146861; 135.7345889 Two-storied wooden building with white walls and an attached open veranda with handrail on the upper floor.
Refectory (食堂 jikidō?)[140] Hōryū-ji 7×4, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0710Nara period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′53.02″N 135°44′7.91″E / 34.6147278°N 135.7355306°E / 34.6147278; 135.7355306 Wooden building with white walls and gabled roof next to a similar building.
Shōryō-in (聖霊院?)[nb 6][141] Hōryū-ji 6×5, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] entrance in gable ends, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] attached hisashi in front, with a 1 ken step canopy covered with hinoki cypress bark shingles; hall dedicated to the soul of Prince Shōtoku, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1284Kamakura period, 1284 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.39″N 135°44′5.96″E / 34.6142750°N 135.7349889°E / 34.6142750; 135.7349889 Wooden building with open railed veranda, gabled roof and an attached step canopy.
West Octagonal Hall (西円堂 saiendō?)[nb 40][142] Hōryū-ji octagonal hall, single-storied, hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1250early Kamakura period, 1250 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′52.78″N 135°43′58.93″E / 34.6146611°N 135.7330361°E / 34.6146611; 135.7330361 A small wooden octagonal building with white walls on a stone platform.
Large Lecture Hall (大講堂 daikōdō?)[16][143] Hōryū-ji 9×4, 33.8 m × 16.5 m (111 ft × 54 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] oldest extant building with a hidden roof; part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0990middle Heian period, 990 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′53.22″N 135°44′3.03″E / 34.6147833°N 135.7341750°E / 34.6147833; 135.7341750 Wide and low wooden building with white walls and a hip-and gable roof.
Inner Gate (中門 chūmon?)[144] Hōryū-ji 4×3 two-storied gate with entrance through the two central bays, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0700Asuka period, ca. 700 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′50.41″N 135°44′3.51″E / 34.6140028°N 135.7343083°E / 34.6140028; 135.7343083 Large two-storied gate with a hip-and-gable roof and a railed open veranda on the upper floor. There are two guardina statues on either side of the passage.
Belfry (鐘楼 shōrō?)[139] Hōryū-ji (East Precinct (東院 tōin?)) 3×2, flared skirt like lower part (袴腰, hakamagoshi), irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1185early Kamakura period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′52.75″N 135°44′19.18″E / 34.6146528°N 135.7386611°E / 34.6146528; 135.7386611 Small wooden tower shaped structure with a flared lower part and a hip-and-gable roof.
Denpōdō (伝法堂?)[nb 6][145] Hōryū-ji (East Precinct (東院 tōin?)) 7×4, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] lecture hall, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0710Nara period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′53.1″N 135°44′19.93″E / 34.614750°N 135.7388694°E / 34.614750; 135.7388694 Horyu-ji55n4500.jpg
Hall of Dreams (夢殿 yumedono?)[nb 5][16][146] Hōryū-ji (East Precinct (東院 tōin?)) Large octagonal hall housing the famous Guze Kannon, single-storied, each side 4.2 m (14 ft) long, hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0739Nara period, 739 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′51.91″N 135°44′20.19″E / 34.6144194°N 135.7389417°E / 34.6144194; 135.7389417 Large octagonal wooden building with white walls.
East Dormitory (東室 higashimuro?)[147] Hōryū-ji 12×4, single-storied, kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] living quarters for high-ranking priests, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0710Nara period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′52.2″N 135°44′5.89″E / 34.614500°N 135.7349694°E / 34.614500; 135.7349694 Long wooden building with white walls.
Tōdaimon (東大門?)[148] Hōryū-ji ken wide eight-legged gate,[ex 11] kirizuma style,[ex 3] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] main east gate, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 0710Nara period Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′49.89″N 135°44′12.08″E / 34.6138583°N 135.7366889°E / 34.6138583; 135.7366889 Wooden gate with white walls, red beams and a gabled roof.
Nandaimon (南大門?)[nb 41][149] Hōryū-ji ken wide eight-legged gate,[ex 11] irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] main south gate, part of the World Heritage Site Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area 1438middle Muromachi period, 1438 Nara IkarugaIkaruga, Nara34°36′45.89″N 135°44′4.26″E / 34.6127472°N 135.7345167°E / 34.6127472; 135.7345167 Wooden gate with white walls and a hip-and-gable roof.
Tōindō (東院堂?)[nb 42][150] Yakushi-ji 7×4, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] meditation hall, rebuilt in 1285, oldest of its kind in Japan, part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 1285late Kamakura period, 1285 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′4.64″N 135°47′6.66″E / 34.6679556°N 135.7851833°E / 34.6679556; 135.7851833 Wooden building with white walls and a slightly raised floor.
East Pagoda (東塔 tōtō?)[14][151] Yakushi-ji 3×3 three-storied pagoda, each level with a pent roof enclosure;[ex 7] part of the World Heritage Site Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara 0730Nara period, 730 Nara NaraNara, Nara34°40′5.18″N 135°47′4.88″E / 34.6681056°N 135.7846889°E / 34.6681056; 135.7846889 Three storied wooden pagoda with white walls. Additional pent roofs on every floor give the appearance of twice as many floors, i.e. six floors.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 6][152] Ryōsen-ji 5×6, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1283late Kamakura period, 1283 Nara NaraNara, Nara 34°40′25.01″N 135°44′32.46″E / 34.6736139°N 135.7423500°E / 34.6736139; 135.7423500 Wooden building with hip-and-gable roof, slightly raised floor, white walls and an open railed veranda.
Octagonal Hall (八角堂 hakkakudō?)[nb 43][153] Eisan-ji (榮山寺?) octagonal hall, single-storied, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 0757Nara period, Tenpyō-hōji era, 8th century Nara GojouGojō, Nara
34°21′21.25″N 135°43′16.22″E / 34.3559028°N 135.7211722°E / 34.3559028; 135.7211722
Eisanji hakkakudou.JPG
West Pagoda (西塔 saitō?)[154] Taima-dera 3×3 three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 0800early Heian period, 9th century Nara KatsuragiKatsuragi, Nara34°30′55.49″N 135°41′40.24″E / 34.5154139°N 135.6945111°E / 34.5154139; 135.6945111 Wooden three-storied pagoda with white walls and dark beams.
East Pagoda (東塔 tōtō?)[154] Taima-dera 3×3 three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 0710early Nara period, 8th century Nara KatsuragiKatsuragi, Nara34°30′55.13″N 135°41′44.58″E / 34.5153139°N 135.6957167°E / 34.5153139; 135.6957167 Two pagodas on a mountain slope.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?) or Mandaradō (曼荼羅堂?)[154] Taima-dera 7×6, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof,[ex 2] houses a large (39.7 cm x 39.1 cm) Mandala, contains an akadana (閼伽棚?) 1161late Heian period, 1161 Nara KatsuragiKatsuragi, Nara34°30′57.83″N 135°41′40.91″E / 34.5160639°N 135.6946972°E / 34.5160639; 135.6946972 Wide and low wooden building with trapezoidal roof, raised floor, white walls and a railed veranda.
Tahōtō (多宝塔?)[155] Kongōsanmai-in (金剛三昧院?) 3×3, two-storied Buddhist tower, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1223early Kamakura period, 1223 Wakayama KōyaKōya, Wakayama
34°12′34.95″N 135°35′13.9″E / 34.2097083°N 135.587194°E / 34.2097083; 135.587194
A two-storied pagoda shaped tower with a square base and a round upper story. The walls are faded white and the beams faded red.
Fudōdō (不動堂?)[156] Kongōbu-ji 3×4, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] with 1 (3) ken hisashi attached to the right (left) side, with a 1 ken step canopy, hinoki cypress bark shingles; hall dedicated to the deity Fudō Myōō 1185early Kamakura period Wakayama KōyaKōya, Wakayama
34°12′47.17″N 135°34′49.43″E / 34.2131028°N 135.5803972°E / 34.2131028; 135.5803972
Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and step canopy. A shorter aisle is attached to the right side.
Tahōtō (多宝塔?) or Daitō (大塔?)[157] Negoro-ji 5×5, large two-storied Buddhist tower, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1492late Muromachi period, Meiō eraTenbun era Wakayama IwadeIwade, Wakayama34°17′16.36″N 135°19′2.76″E / 34.2878778°N 135.3174333°E / 34.2878778; 135.3174333 A large two-storied pagoda shaped tower with a square base and a round upper story. The walls are white and the beams faded red.
Shakadō (釈迦堂?)[158] Zenpuku-in (善福院?) 3×3, pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] hall in which a statue of the historical Buddha is enshrined 1327late Kamakura period, 1327 Wakayama KainanKainan, Wakayama
34°7′50.12″N 135°10′38″E / 34.1305889°N 135.17722°E / 34.1305889; 135.17722
Wooden building with added pent roof enclosure.
Tahōtō (多宝塔?)[159] Chōhō-ji 3×3, two-storied Buddhist tower 1357early Muromachi period, 1357 Wakayama KainanKainan, Wakayama34°6′32.21″N 135°9′56.85″E / 34.1089472°N 135.1657917°E / 34.1089472; 135.1657917 Small wooden two-storied pagoda shaped building with a square base and a round upper floor.
Daimon (大門?)[nb 44][160] Chōhō-ji rōmon, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1388early Muromachi period, 1388 Wakayama KainanKainan, Wakayama
34°6′28.12″N 135°9′55.87″E / 34.1078111°N 135.1655194°E / 34.1078111; 135.1655194
Chohoji18s5s2700.jpg
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 9][161] Chōhō-ji 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1311late Kamakura period, 1311 Wakayama KainanKainan, Wakayama34°6′32.77″N 135°9′56.34″E / 34.1091028°N 135.1656500°E / 34.1091028; 135.1656500 Wooden building with slightly raised floor, white walls and a hip-and-gable roof.
Three-storied Pagoda (三重塔 sanjūnotō?)[162] Kōjō-ji (向上寺?) 3×3, three-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1432middle Muromachi period, 1432 Hiroshima OnomichiOnomichi, Hiroshima34°18′24.81″N 133°5′12.04″E / 34.3068917°N 133.0866778°E / 34.3068917; 133.0866778 Three-storied pagoda with white walls and red beams. There are railed verandas on the two upper stories.
Tahōtō (多宝塔?)[nb 45][163] Jōdo-ji (浄土寺?) 3×3, two-storied Buddhist tower, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1319late Kamakura period, 1319 Hiroshima OnomichiOnomichi, Hiroshima34°24′42.54″N 133°12′39.53″E / 34.4118167°N 133.2109806°E / 34.4118167; 133.2109806 Wooden two-storied pagoda shaped building with a square base and a round upper floor, white walls and red beams.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 46][164] Jōdo-ji (浄土寺?) 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1327late Kamakura period, 1327 Hiroshima OnomichiOnomichi, Hiroshima34°24′43.39″N 133°12′39.05″E / 34.4120528°N 133.2108472°E / 34.4120528; 133.2108472 Wooden building with raised floor, white walls, red beams, a hip-and-gable roof and a canopy over the staircase.
Golden Hall (金堂 kon-dō?)[165] Fudō-in (不動院?) 3×4, pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress bark shingles; principal hall 1540late Muromachi period, 1540 Hiroshima HiroshimaHiroshima34°25′37.25″N 132°28′16.02″E / 34.4270139°N 132.4711167°E / 34.4270139; 132.4711167 Large wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof and an enclosing pent roof.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[166] Myōō-in 3×3, 4.4 m (14 ft), 29.1 m (95 ft) tall, five-storied pagoda, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1348early Muromachi period, 1348 Hiroshima FukuyamaFukuyama, Hiroshima34°28′41.82″N 133°20′45.15″E / 34.4782833°N 133.3458750°E / 34.4782833; 133.3458750 Five-storied pagoda with white walls and red beams.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 47][167] Myōō-in 5×5, 11.8 m × 11.8 m (39 ft × 39 ft) single-storied, irimoya style[ex 4] with a 1 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1321late Kamakura period, 1321 Hiroshima FukuyamaFukuyama, Hiroshima34°28′42.56″N 133°20′45.17″E / 34.4784889°N 133.3458806°E / 34.4784889; 133.3458806 Wooden building with white walls, red beams and a hip-and-gable roof.
Buddha Hall (仏殿 butsuden?)[168] Kōzan-ji 3×3, irimoya style,[ex 4] pent roof enclosure,[ex 7] hinoki cypress bark shingles 1320late Kamakura period, 1320 Yamaguchi ShimonosekiShimonoseki, Yamaguchi
33°59′44.16″N 130°58′54.42″E / 33.9956000°N 130.9817833°E / 33.9956000; 130.9817833
Large wooden building with and added enclosing pent roof.
Five-storied Pagoda (五重塔 gojūnotō?)[nb 48][169] Rurikō-ji (瑠璃光寺?) 3×3, five-storied pagoda, hinoki cypress bark shingles 1442middle Muromachi period, 1442 Yamaguchi YamaguchiYamaguchi, Yamaguchi34°11′24.65″N 131°28′22.5″E / 34.1901806°N 131.472917°E / 34.1901806; 131.472917 Five-storied wooden pagoda with white walls.
Main Hall (本堂 hondō?)[nb 49][170] Motoyama-ji 5×5, single-storied, yosemune style[ex 9] with a 3 ken step canopy, hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1300late Kamakura period, 1300 Kagawa MitoyoMitoyo, Kagawa
34°8′22.91″N 133°41′38.74″E / 34.1396972°N 133.6940944°E / 34.1396972; 133.6940944
Small wooden building with a trapezoidal roof.
Niō Gate (二王門 niōmon?)[171] Ishite-ji ken wide rōmon, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1318late Kamakura period, 1318 Matsuyama EhimeMatsuyama, Ehime
33°50′51.11″N 132°47′47.58″E / 33.8475306°N 132.7965500°E / 33.8475306; 132.7965500
Small wooden gate with two guardian statues in the outer bays.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[27] Taisan-ji 7×9, 16.4 m × 21 m (54 ft × 69 ft), single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof;[ex 2] largest esoteric Buddhist hall 1305late Kamakura period, 1305 Matsuyama EhimeMatsuyama, Ehime33°53′6.05″N 132°42′53.86″E / 33.8850139°N 132.7149611°E / 33.8850139; 132.7149611 Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof.
Main Hall (本堂 hon-dō?)[nb 50] Taihō-ji 3×4, single-storied, yosemune style,[ex 9] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1300late Kamakura period Matsuyama EhimeMatsuyama, Ehime 33°50′30.37″N 132°44′31.88″E / 33.8417694°N 132.7421889°E / 33.8417694; 132.7421889 Koshozan Taihoji 03.JPG
Yakushi Hall (薬師堂 yakushidō?)[172] Buraku-ji (豊楽寺?) 5×5, single-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hinoki cypress shingles 1151late Heian period, 1151 Kōchi ŌtoyoŌtoyo, Kōchi Wooden building with a hip-and-gable roof.
Great Leader's Treasure Hall (大雄宝殿 daiyūhōden?)[173] Sōfuku-ji 5×4, two-storied, irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1646early Edo period, 1646 Nagasaki NagasakiNagasaki Wooden building painted red with a hip-and-gable roof.
Daiippōmon (第一峰門?)[173] Sōfuku-ji four-legged Chinese style gate,[ex 10] irimoya style,[ex 4] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] 1644early Edo period, 1644 Nagasaki NagasakiNagasaki Small wooden gate painted in red, green and blue. Boards with Chinese characters are attached to the gate.
Ōdō (大堂?)[nb 51][174] Fuki-ji 3×4, single-storied, hōgyō style,[ex 1] hongawarabuki roof[ex 2] with smooth, lipless, semi-cylindrical cover tiles (行基葺, gyōgibuki)[110] 1100late Heian period Ōita BungotakadaBungotakada, Ōita33°32′16.45″N 131°31′42.79″E / 33.5379028°N 131.5285528°E / 33.5379028; 131.5285528 Simple wooden building with slightly raised floor and pyramid shaped roof.

See also[edit]

  • For an explanation of terms concerning Japanese Buddhism, Japanese Buddhist art, and Japanese Buddhist temple architecture, see the Glossary of Japanese Buddhism.

Notes[edit]

General[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f The National Treasure structures of Zuiryū-ji (瑞龍寺?) are registered as a single National Treasure under one registration number. Only in the main treasure table of this article, the single entry is split in three parts for readability.
  2. ^ The statues represented the nine stages of nirvana.[26]
  3. ^ The following items are attached to the nomination:
    • four munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction,
    • one votive tablet (納札 nōsatsu?),
    • six parts of a former handrail,
    • six pieces of ancient timber,
    • two pieces of former ornamental metal fittings
  4. ^ The nomination includes the entrance hall and a room in the northern aisle.
  5. ^ a b c d e Two munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m One munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction is attached to the nomination.
  7. ^ Three inscription boards (銘札) and five munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination
  8. ^ Two ancient drawings and two munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination
  9. ^ a b c d e f One miniature shrine is attached to the nomination.
  10. ^ The nomination includes one butsudan Buddhist altar and one munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction.
  11. ^ One miniature shrine is attached to the nomination.
  12. ^ One hōkyōintō is attached to the nomination.
  13. ^ One miniature shrine is attached to the nomination.
  14. ^ Three dais and shrines are attached to the nomination.
  15. ^ One miniature shrine is attached to the nomination.
  16. ^ One concave and one convex roof tile are attached to the nomination
  17. ^ One miniature shrine is attached to the nomination
  18. ^ One munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction is attached to the nomination.
  19. ^ One miniature shrine and five munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  20. ^ Three miniature shrines are attached to the nomination.
  21. ^ The entrance hall and four munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  22. ^ One miniature shrine, three former ridge beams and three munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  23. ^ A corridor is attached to the nomination.
  24. ^ Eight doors (板扉 itatobira?) made of a single thick wooden plank and a pair of phoenix roof ornaments are attached to the nomination.
  25. ^ The entrance hall and three munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  26. ^ One buddhist altar (仏壇 butsudan?) is attached to the nomination.
  27. ^ A miniature shrine with two wooden panels is attached to the nomination.
  28. ^ A wooden box with two hand scrolls of the Lotus sutra and two rafter caps are attached to the nomination.
  29. ^ Eight kokabe (小壁?) walls of the former inner sanctuary and one munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  30. ^ One wind bell (風鐸 fūtaku?) is attached to the nomination.
  31. ^ The nomination includes , a miniature shrine, one butsudan Buddhist altar and one munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction.
  32. ^ The nomination includes a miniature shrine and one butsudan Buddhist altar.
  33. ^ Six munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  34. ^ Three hidden ridges (野棟木 nomunagi?) are attached to the nomination.
  35. ^ Attached to the nomination are:
    • two munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction
    • one broad concave almost rectangular roof tile (平瓦) from 1648
    • three pages of construction plans for the hon-dō
    • four pages of plans for the Hase-dera compound
    • a catalogue of the construction costs
  36. ^ 22 construction parts are attached to the nomination.
  37. ^ Four frog leg struts (蟇股 kaerumata?) and one pair of 高座.
  38. ^ One dais and a miniature shrine are attached to the nomination.
  39. ^ Part of the original framework is attached to the nomination.
  40. ^ One beam of the former roof skeleton and two munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  41. ^ One ridge pole and one munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  42. ^ One broad concave almost rectangular roof tile (平瓦) is attached to the nomination.
  43. ^ Remains of the former dew basin at the bottom of the finial are attached to the nomination.
  44. ^ One framed motto (扁額 hengaku?) is attached to the nomination.
  45. ^ A sutra inserted in the pagoda finial is attached to the nomination.
  46. ^ One miniature shrine, two munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction and two pages of a compound map are attached to the nomination.
  47. ^ One miniature shrine and three munafuda (棟札?) ridge tags with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  48. ^ One square bearing block is attached to the nomination.
  49. ^ Three miniature shrines and part of a ridge pole are attached to the nomination.
  50. ^ One miniature shrine and one munafuda (棟札?) ridge tag with information on the building's construction are attached to the nomination.
  51. ^ Part of a former ridge pole is attached to the nomination.

Architecture[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h (hōgyō-zukuri, 宝形造): a pyramid shaped roof over a square building[32]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs (hongawarabuki, 本瓦葺): a tile roof composed of flat broad concave tiles and semi-cylindrical convex tiles covering the seams of the former[33]
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u (kirizuma-zukuri, 切妻造): a gabled roof with equal lengths from the ridge to the eaves[35]
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv (irimoya-zukuri, 入母屋造): a hip-and-gable roof combining a ridge and two gable pediments on the upper part with a hipped roof on all sides in the lower part of the roof[36]
  5. ^ a b (tochibuki, 栩葺): type of board roofing whereby circa 1–3 cm (0.39–1.18 in) thick and 60 cm (24 in) long boards are split and laid down with considerable overlap[41][42]
  6. ^ a b c (nokikarahafu, 軒唐破風): an undulating Karahafu gable at eave ends[49]
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w (mokoshi, 裳階): a pent roof enclosure, generally one ken deep[45]
  8. ^ a b c d e f (karahafu, 唐破風): an undulating bargeboard flowing downwards from the top center with convex curves on each side that change to concave curves which either level off or turn upward at the ends[49]
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z (yosemune-zukuri, 寄棟造): a hipped roof where the front and back are trapezoidal and the sides triangular in shape; in Japan generally used for buildings of less importance[54]
  10. ^ a b c d (shikyakumon, 四脚門): a single-storied gate with two main pillars in line with the ridge of the roof and a pair of supporting square posts ("legs") on either side. generally with a gabled roof[72]
  11. ^ a b c d (hakkyakumon, 八脚門): a single-storied gate with four main pillars in line with the ridge of the roof and four supporting square posts ("legs") on either side. generally with a gabled roof[77]
  12. ^ a b (sangawarabuki, 桟瓦葺): a roof tile combining a broad concave tile with a semi-cylindrical convex tile into one tile. The tile is square undulating from concave to convex.[85]
  13. ^ (chidori hafu, 千鳥破風, lit. "plover gable"): a decorative dormer bargeboard on triangular shaped dormers with strong concave curves[120]
  14. ^ a b c (rō-zukuri, 楼造): a high gate with a shallow veranda and balustrade which gives it the impression of a two-storied gate[124]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  2. ^ a b "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  3. ^ Coaldrake, William Howard (2002) [1996]. Architecture and authority in Japan. London, New York: Routledge. p. 248. ISBN 0-415-05754-X. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  4. ^ a b "Cultural Properties for Future Generations" (PDF). Tokyo, Japan: Agency for Cultural Affairs, Cultural Properties Department. March 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  5. ^ a b c "国指定文化財 データベース" [Database of National Cultural Properties] (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. 2008-11-01. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  6. ^ Sansom & Sansom 1958, p. 49
  7. ^ a b Young & Young 2007, p. 38
  8. ^ a b c d Fletcher & Cruickshank 1996, p. 731
  9. ^ Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 13
  10. ^ a b c d e Young & Young 2007, p. 44
  11. ^ Young, Young & Yew 2004, p. 52
  12. ^ Young, Young & Yew 2004, p. 44
  13. ^ Young & Young 2007, p. 39
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i Young & Young 2007, p. 46
  15. ^ a b Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 16
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h Fletcher & Cruickshank 1996, p. 732
  17. ^ Young & Young 2007, p. 49
  18. ^ Young, Young & Yew 2004, p. 47
  19. ^ a b Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 17
  20. ^ a b Kleiner & Mamiya 2009, p. 97
  21. ^ Young, Young & Yew 2004, p. 48
  22. ^ Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 19
  23. ^ Young & Young 2007, p. 56
  24. ^ Kleiner & Mamiya 2009, p. 98
  25. ^ Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 18
  26. ^ a b c Young, Young & Yew 2004, p. 49
  27. ^ a b c d e f Fletcher & Cruickshank 1996, p. 737
  28. ^ Nishi & Hozumi 1996, p. 20
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i Fletcher & Cruickshank 1996, p. 738
  30. ^ Publication of Asahi Shimbun "Beauty of national treasure No.39, 2010"
  31. ^ "金色堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Chūson-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  32. ^ "hougyou-zukuri". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  33. ^ "hongawarabuki". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  34. ^ a b "瑞巌寺 見所" [Zuigan-ji highlights] (in Japanese). Zuigan-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  35. ^ "kirizuma-zukuri". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  36. ^ "irimoya-zukuri". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  37. ^ "羽黒山五重塔" [Mount Haguro Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Asahi Shimbun. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  38. ^ "羽黒山五重塔" [Mount Haguro Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Tsuruoka Kanko. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  39. ^ "羽黒山五重塔" [Mount Haguro Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Dewa Tabi. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  40. ^ "白水阿弥陀堂" (in Japanese). Iwaki city. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  41. ^ "tochibuki". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  42. ^ Kuroda 2005
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  44. ^ "正福寺地蔵堂" [Shōfuku-ji Jizō Hall] (in Japanese). Architectural map. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  45. ^ "mokoshi". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  46. ^ "Kita-Kamakura" (in Japanese). Kamakura: History and Historic Sites. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  47. ^ "Butsuden". Zuiryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  48. ^ "Houdou". Zuiryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  49. ^ a b "karahafu". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  50. ^ "Sanmon". Zuiryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  51. ^ a b "文化財-明通寺" [Cultural Properties - Myōtsū-ji]. Obama city. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  52. ^ "清白寺" [Seihaku-ji]. Yamanashi city. Archived from the original on 2008-04-04. 
  53. ^ "ぶどう寺 大善寺" [Budō-ji Daizen-ji]. Daizen-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  54. ^ "yosemune-zukuri". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  55. ^ "Anrakuji Temple English Page2". Anraku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  56. ^ "本堂のご案内" [Information about the Main Hall] (in Japanese). Zenkō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  57. ^ "観音堂" [Kannon Hall] (in Japanese). Eihō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  58. ^ "開山堂" [Founder's Hall] (in Japanese). Eihō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  59. ^ "弥陀堂" [Amida Hall] (in Japanese). Kira. Archived from the original on 2011-06-15. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  60. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Mii-dera. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  61. ^ Enryaku-ji Mount Hiei, World Cultural Asset. Enryaku-ji. 
  62. ^ "konpon chuudou". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  63. ^ "境内のご案内" [Coumpound Information]. Kongōrin-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  64. ^ a b "縁起" [Omen]. Jōraku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
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  66. ^ "西明寺-本堂" [Saimyō-ji Main Hall] (in Japanese). Saimyō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  67. ^ "西明寺-本堂" [Saimyō-ji Main Hall] (in Japanese). Saimyō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
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  69. ^ "善水寺" [Zensui-ji] (in Japanese). Zensui-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  70. ^ "長寿寺" [Chōju-ji] (in Japanese). Shiga Prefecture. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  71. ^ "唐門" [Karamon] (in Japanese). Hōgon-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  72. ^ "shikyakumon". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  73. ^ "海住山寺" [Kaijūsen-ji] (in Japanese). Kaijūsen-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  74. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Tō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  75. ^ "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Tō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  76. ^ "御影堂" [Miei Hall] (in Japanese). Tō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  77. ^ "hakkyakumon". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  78. ^ "光明寺" [Kōmyō-ji] (in Japanese).  Kanbayashi. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  79. ^ "広隆寺" [Kōryū-ji] (in Japanese). aba-pon. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  80. ^ a b "浄瑠璃寺" [Jōruri-ji] (in Japanese). Kizugawa, Kyoto. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  81. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Ninna-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  82. ^ "本堂と清水の舞台" [Main Hall and Kiyomizu Stage] (in Japanese). Kiyomizu-dera. Retrieved 2011-05-08. 
  83. ^ "大仙院のご紹介" [introduction to Daisen-in] (in Japanese). Daisen-in. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  84. ^ Ryogen-in Zen Temple. Ryogen-in Zen Temple. 
  85. ^ "sangawarabuki". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  86. ^ "大報恩寺" [Daihōon-ji]. Tourism and Culture Information System (in Japanese). Kyoto. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  87. ^ a b Daigoji Temple. Daigo-ji. 
  88. ^ a b "醍醐寺:下醍醐 伽藍のご案内". Tourism and Culture Information System (in Japanese). Daigo-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  89. ^ "醍醐寺: 上醍醐 伽藍のご案内" [Daigo-ji: Upper Daigo temple information] (in Japanese). Daigo-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  90. ^ a b "An Overview of the Buildings on the Temple Grounds (Part1)". Chion-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  91. ^ a b "臨済宗大本山 東福寺" [Head temple of the Rinzai scholl Tōfuku-ji]. Tōfuku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  92. ^ "南禅寺境内 方丈" [Nanzen-ji compound Hōjō] (in Japanese). Nanzen-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  93. ^ "世界遺産 平等院" [World Heritage Byōdō-in] (in Japanese). Byōdō-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  94. ^ "唐門" [Karamon] (in Japanese). Nishi Honganji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  95. ^ "蓮華王院 三十三間堂" [Rengeō-in Sanjūsangen-dō] (in Japanese). Sanjūsangen-dō. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  96. ^ "高野山真言宗遺跡本山 檜尾山観心寺" [Kōyasan Shingon sect historic ruins of head temple, Kanshin-ji] (in Japanese). Kanshin-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  97. ^ "文化財(建築等)" [cultural properties (structures)] (in Japanese). Jigen-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  98. ^ "一乗寺  加西市観光案内" [Ichijō-ji Kasai city sightseeing guide] (in Japanese). Kasai city. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  99. ^ "国宝浄土寺" [National Treasure Jōdo-ji] (in Japanese). Ono city. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  100. ^ "三身山 太山寺" [Sanshinzan Taisan-ji] (in Japanese). Taisan-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  101. ^ a b "国宝文化財一覧" [List of cultural treasures] (in Japanese). Kakurin-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  102. ^ "五重小塔" [Small Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Kairyūō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  103. ^ a b c d The Kohfukuji Temple Complex. Kōfuku-ji. 
  104. ^ "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Kōfuku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  105. ^ "三重塔" [Three-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Kōfuku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  106. ^ "東金堂" [Eastern Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Kōfuku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  107. ^ "北円堂" [North Octagonal Hall] (in Japanese). Kōfuku-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  108. ^ "収蔵庫(宝物殿)の収蔵品" [Artifacts of the Treasure House] (in Japanese). Gangō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  109. ^ a b "元興寺の建築・境内" [Architecture and compound of Gangō-ji] (in Japanese). Gangō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  110. ^ a b c "gyougibuki gawara". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-27. 
  111. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Murō-ji. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  112. ^ "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Murō-ji. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  113. ^ "灌頂堂" [Kanjō Hall] (in Japanese). Murō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  114. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall] (in Japanese). Jūrin-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  115. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall] (in Japanese). Shin-Yakushi-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  116. ^ "宮内庁:正倉院" [Imperial Household Agency:Shōsōin] (in Japanese). Imperial Household Agency. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  117. ^ "天理市" [Tenri city] (in Japanese). Tenri city. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  118. ^ "長弓寺本堂" [Chōkyū-ji Main Hall] (in Japanese). Chōkyū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  119. ^ "長谷寺" [Hase-dera] (in Japanese). Hase-dera. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  120. ^ "chidori hafu". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-08. 
  121. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Tōshōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  122. ^ "経蔵" [Scripture House] (in Japanese). Tōshōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  123. ^ "鼓楼" [Korō] (in Japanese). Tōshōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  124. ^ "rou-zukuri". JAANUS – Japanese Architecture and Art Net User System. Retrieved 2009-11-14. 
  125. ^ "講堂" [Lecture Hall] (in Japanese). Tōshōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  126. ^ "宝蔵" [Treasure House] (in Japanese). Tōshōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  127. ^ "開山堂" [Founder's Hall] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  128. ^ "大仏殿" [Great Buddha Hall] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  129. ^ "転害門" [Tegaimon] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  130. ^ "南大門" [Nandaimon] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  131. ^ "二月堂" [Nigatsu-dō] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  132. ^ "法華堂" [Hokke-dō] (in Japanese). Tōdai-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  133. ^ "法起寺の建造物" [Structures of Hokki-ji] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  134. ^ "廻廊" [East Corridor] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  135. ^ "経蔵" [Scripture House] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  136. ^ "Nomination File". UNESCO. June 1997. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  137. ^ "綱封蔵" [Kōfūzō] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  138. ^ "三経院" [Three Sutra Hall] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  139. ^ a b "鐘楼" [Belfry] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  140. ^ "食堂" [Refectory] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  141. ^ "聖霊院" [Shōryō-in] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  142. ^ "西円堂" [West Octagonal Hall] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  143. ^ "大講堂" [Large Lecture Hall] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  144. ^ "中門" [Inner Gate] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  145. ^ "伝法堂" [Denpōdō] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  146. ^ "夢殿" [Hall of Dreams] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  147. ^ "東室" [East Dormitory] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  148. ^ "東大門" [Tōdaimon] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  149. ^ "南大門" [Nandaimon] (in Japanese). Hōryū-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  150. ^ "東院堂" [Tōindō] (in Japanese). Yakushi-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  151. ^ "東塔" [East Pagoda] (in Japanese). Yakushi-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  152. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall] (in Japanese). Ryōsen-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  153. ^ "榮山寺" [Eisan-ji] (in Japanese). Gojō, Nara. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  154. ^ a b c "Taima-dera" (in Japanese). Taima-dera. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  155. ^ "多宝塔" [Tahōtō] (in Japanese). Kongōsanmai-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  156. ^ "不動堂" [Fudōdō] (in Japanese). koyasan. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  157. ^ "根来寺の名所" [famous places of Negoro-ji] (in Japanese). Negoro-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  158. ^ "釈迦堂" [Shakadō] (in Japanese). Kainan city. Archived from the original on 2011-07-21. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  159. ^ "多宝塔" [Tahōtō]. Chōhō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  160. ^ "大門" [Daimon]. Chōhō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  161. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall]. Chōhō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  162. ^ "三重塔 向上寺" [Three-storied Pagoda Kōjō-ji] (in Japanese). Hiroshima prefecture. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  163. ^ "多宝塔" [Tahōtō] (in Japanese). Jōdo-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  164. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall] (in Japanese). Jōdo-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  165. ^ "金堂" [Golden Hall] (in Japanese). Fudō-in. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  166. ^ "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Fukuyama city. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  167. ^ "本堂" [Main Hall] (in Japanese). Fukuyama city. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  168. ^ "仏殿" [Buddha Hall] (in Japanese). Kōzan-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  169. ^ "五重塔" [Five-storied Pagoda] (in Japanese). Rurikō-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  170. ^ "本山寺" [Motoyama-ji] (in Japanese). Mitoyo. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  171. ^ "石手寺縁起・衛門三郎四国遍路の開祖・文化財写真" [Ishite-ji, pictures of cultural properties] (in Japanese). Ishite-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  172. ^ "大豊町 : 史蹟・文化財" [Ōtoyo : historical landmarks, cultural properties] (in Japanese). Ōtoyo, Kōchi. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  173. ^ a b "Sofukuji Temple" (in Japanese). Nagasaki. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 
  174. ^ "大堂" [Ōdō] (in Japanese). Fuki-ji. Retrieved 2009-11-23. 

Bibliography[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]