List of Native American Medal of Honor recipients

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This is a list of Native Americans awarded the nation's highest military decoration — the Medal of Honor. The Medal of Honor is bestowed "for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty, in actual combat against an armed enemy force." The medal is awarded by the President of the United States on behalf of the Congress.

Of the 3,469 Medals of Honor awarded as of 2010, 28 have been awarded to Native Americans.

The Medal of Honor was created during the American Civil War and is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its armed forces. The recipient must have distinguished themselves at the risk of their own life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an enemy of the United States. Due to the nature of this medal, it is commonly presented posthumously.[1]

List of recipients[edit]

  This along with * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously
Head of a Native American man with straight shoulder-length hair, wearing a beaded necklace tight around his neck.
William Alchesay
Elsatsoosu
Head and shoulders of a dark-skinned man with bushy white hair and white beard wearing a buttoned-up shirt.
Pompey Factor
Head of a squinting man wearing a shirt unbottoned at the collar and a cloth aviator's cap with headphones built into the ear flaps, an unbuckled chin strap, and goggles pushed up onto his forehead.
Gregory "Pappy" Boyington
Head and shoulders of a young man wearing a peaked cap and a military jacket with ribbon bars and a badge on the left breast.
Mitchell Red Cloud
Tony Burris
Head and torso of a man sitting with his arms folded on his lap, wearing a garrison cap, horn-rimmed glasses, and a military jacket. The jacket's left breast is completely covered in ribbon bars and medals.
Woodrow Keeble
Name Tribe/Nation Service Rank Conflict Place of action Date of action Notes
Co-Rux-Te-Chod-Ish Pawnee Army Sergeant Indian Wars Republican River, Kansas July 8, 1869 "Ran out from the command in pursuit of a dismounted Indian; was shot down and badly wounded by a bullet from his own command"
Chiquito White Mountain Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1871–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Jim White Mountain Apache Army Sergeant Indian Wars
Winter of 1871–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Machol Apache Army Private Indian Wars Arizona Territory 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Nannasaddie White Mountain Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Nantaje White Mountain Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Alchesay, WilliamWilliam Alchesay White Mountain Apache Army Sergeant Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Blanquet Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Elsatsoosu Apache Army Corporal Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Kelsay White Mountain Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Kosoha White Mountain Apache Army Scout Indian Wars Arizona Territory Winter of 1872–1873 For his "conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches"
Paine, AdamAdam Paine Black Seminole Army Private Indian Wars Canyon Blanco tributary of the Red River, Texas September 26, 1874 – September 27, 1874 "Rendered invaluable service to Col. R. S. Mackenzie, 4th U.S. Cavalry, during this engagement"
Factor, PompeyPompey Factor Black Seminole Army Private Indian Wars Pecos River, Texas April 25, 1875 With three others, charged a numerically superior force
Payne, IsaacIsaac Payne Black Seminole Army Trumpeter Indian Wars Pecos River, Texas April 25, 1875 With three others, charged a numerically superior force
Ward, JohnJohn Ward Black Seminole Army Sergeant Indian Wars Pecos River, Texas April 25, 1875 With three others, charged a numerically superior force
Rowdy Apache Army Sergeant Indian Wars Arizona Territory March 7, 1890
Boyington, PappyPappy Boyington Sioux Marine Corps Major World War II Central Solomons area, Pacific Ocean September 12, 1943 – January 3, 1944 Led his squadron in a series of missions against superior numbers
Childers, ErnestErnest Childers Muscogee[2] Army Second Lieutenant World War II Oliveto[disambiguation needed], Italy September 22, 1943 Although injured, killed two snipers and attacked two machine gun nests
Montgomery, Jack C.Jack C. Montgomery Cherokee[2] Army First Lieutenant World War II near Padiglione, Italy February 22, 1944 Single-handedly attacked two German positions and took dozens of prisoners
Barfoot, Van T.Van T. Barfoot Choctaw[2] Army Technical Sergeant World War II near Carano, Italy May 23, 1944 Single-handedly destroyed two machine gun nests, took prisoners, and disabled a tank
Harmon, Roy W.Roy W. Harmon* Army Sergeant World War II near Casaglia, Italy July 12, 1944 Single-handedly attacked three German positions although wounded
Evans, Ernest E.Ernest E. Evans* Cherokee/Muscogee[3] Navy Commander World War II off Samar, Philippines October 25, 1944 Although wounded, continued to command his crippled ship until its sinking
Reese, Jr., John N.John N. Reese, Jr.* Army Private First Class World War II Paco Railroad Station, Manila, Philippines February 9, 1945 With another soldier, attacked a Japanese-held railroad station
Red Cloud, Jr., MitchellMitchell Red Cloud, Jr.* Ho-Chunk[2] Army Corporal Korean War near Chonghyon, Korea November 5, 1950 Maintained an exposed position, continued to fight after being wounded
Harvey, RaymondRaymond Harvey Chickasaw[4] Army Captain Korean War near Taemi-Dong, Korea March 9, 1951 Led his men against a series of emplacements, continued to lead after being wounded
Burris, Tony K.Tony K. Burris* Choctaw[5] Army Sergeant First Class Korean War near Mundung-ni, Korea October 8, 1951 – October 9, 1951 Single-handedly attacked two positions although wounded, killed while attacking a third
Keeble, Woodrow W.Woodrow W. Keeble* Sioux[6] Army Master Sergeant Korean War near Sangsan-ni, Korea October 20, 1951 Single-handedly attacked three machine gun nests
George, CharlesCharles George* Cherokee[2] Army Private First Class Korean War near Songnae-dong, Korea November 30, 1952 Smothered the blast of a grenade with his body

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Brief History — The Medal of Honor". Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Department of Defense. August 8, 2006. Retrieved February 9, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Native American Medal of Honor Winners". Naval History & Heritage Command. June 13, 2005. Retrieved September 26, 2009. 
  3. ^ Thomas, Evan (2006). Sea of Thunder: Four Commanders and the Last Great Naval Campaign, 1941–1945. New York: Simon & Schuster. pp. 53–54. ISBN 978-0-7432-5221-8. 
  4. ^ Jackson, Ron (March 27, 2009). "Story of Chickasaw hero Lt. Col. Raymond Harvey emerges into spotlight". The Oklahoman (Oklahoma City). Retrieved September 26, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Chief's Column October 2007". Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. October 2007. Retrieved September 26, 2009. [dead link]
  6. ^ Wire, Sarah D. (March 4, 2008). "Family accepts 1st Medal of Honor awarded to Sioux tribal member". Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles). Retrieved September 26, 2009.