List of Navy Midshipmen head football coaches

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A Navy coach talks to two of his players during a game
Paul Johnson coached the Midshipmen to five straight bowl games during his six seasons as head coach.

The Navy Midshipmen football team has represented the United States Naval Academy in intercollegiate college football since 1879. The team has participated as an independent school since its creation, but is joining the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) as an expansion team in 2015.[1][2] The Midshipmen joined the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A when it was created in 1978, becoming one of the first independent schools in that division. The program has had 36 head coaches, one interim coach, and two separate periods where it went without a coach since its formation.[3] Since December 2007, Ken Niumatalolo has served as head coach of the Midshipmen.[4]

The academy adopted the nickname "Midshipmen" for its students when it was founded in 1845. Between 1870 and 1902, the school tried out a number of different nicknames, before Congress restored the name "Midshipmen" as the academy's nickname.[5][6] The term has been accepted since.[7] The Midshipmen have played in over 1200 games during the program's 132 seasons (through the 2013 regular season). In those seasons, seven coaches have led the Midshipmen to postseason bowl games, eight have been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame, and one, Bill Ingram, has led the school to a national championship.[3]

Vauix Carter, the program's first coach, is the all-time leader in win percentage, with a perfect 1.000.[A 1] Of coaches who have served in more than one game, Gil Dobie has the highest win percentage with .850 after completing a record of 17–3. George Sauer has the lowest win percentage of any non-interim coach, amassing a percentage of .222 and a record of 3–13–2. George Welsh is the all-time leader in seasons coached at Navy with nine, and also leads in number of games coached (102) and games won (55) through the end of the 2013 season. Paul Johnson and Ken Niumatalolo lead in number of bowl games coached, with five apiece,[A 2] and Johnson has the most bowl wins, with two.[3][9]

Key[edit]

Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, postseason records, and national championships[A 7]
No. Name Term GC OW OL OT O% PW PL PT BG NC
N/A No coach 1879 1 0 0 1 .500 0
1 Carter, VauixVauix Carter 1882 1 1 0 0 1.000 0
N/A No coach 1883–91 40 23 15 2 .600 0
2 Crosby, BenBen Crosby 1892 7 5 2 0 .714 0
3 Hartwell, John A.John A. Hartwell 1893 8 5 3 0 .625 0
4 Wurtenburg, WilliamWilliam Wurtenburg 1894 7 4 1 2 .714 0
5 McClung, MatthewMatthew McClung 1895 7 5 2 0 .714 0
6 Poe, JohnnyJohnny Poe 1896 8 5 3 0 .625 0
7 Armstrong, BillBill Armstrong 1897–99 25 20 5 0 .800 0
8 Cochran, GarrettGarrett Cochran 1900 9 6 3 0 .667 0
9 Hillebrand, DocDoc Hillebrand[14] 1901–02 21 8 11 2 .429 0
10 Chamberlain, BurrBurr Chamberlain 1903 12 4 7 1 .375 0
11 Dashiell, PaulPaul Dashiell 1904–06 34 25 5 4 .794 0
12 Reeves, JoeJoe Reeves 1907 12 9 2 1 .792 0
13 Berrien, FrankFrank Berrien 1908–10 29 21 5 3 .776 0
14 Howard, Douglas LegateDouglas Legate Howard 1911–14 36 25 7 4 .750 0
15 Ingram, JonasJonas Ingram 1915–16 19 9 8 2 .526 0 0 0 0 0
16 Dobie, GilGil Dobie[15] 1917–19 20 17 3 0 .850 0 0 0 0 0
17 Folwell, BobBob Folwell 1920–24 38 24 12 2 .658 0 0 1 1 –
1924 Rose Bowl
0
18 Owsley, JackJack Owsley 1925 8 5 2 1 .688 0 0 0 0 0
19 Ingram, BillBill Ingram[16] 1926–30 49 32 13 4 .694 0 0 0 0 1 –
1926
20 Miller, RipRip Miller[17] 1931–33 29 12 15 2 .448 0 0 0 0 0
21 Hamilton, TomTom Hamilton[18] 1934–36,
1946–47
45 21 23 1 .478 0 0 0 0 0
22 Hardwick, HankHank Hardwick 1937–38 18 8 7 3 .528 0 0 0 0 0
23 Larson, SwedeSwede Larson 1939–41 27 16 8 3 .648 0 0 0 0 0
24 Whelchel, BillickBillick Whelchel 1942–43 18 13 5 0 .722 0 0 0 0 0
25 Hagberg, OscarOscar Hagberg 1944–45 18 13 4 1 .750 0 0 0 0 0
26 Sauer, GeorgeGeorge Sauer[19] 1948–49 18 3 13 2 .222 0 0 0 0 0
27 Erdelatz, EddieEddie Erdelatz 1950–58 84 50 26 8 .643 2 0 0 2 –
1955 Sugar Bowl,
1958 Cotton Bowl
0
28 Hardin, WayneWayne Hardin[20] 1959–64 62 38 22 2 .629 0 2 0 2 –
1961 Orange Bowl,
1964 Cotton Bowl
0
29 Elias, BillBill Elias 1965–68 40 15 22 3 .413 0 0 0 0 0
30 Forzano, RickRick Forzano 1969–72 43 10 33 0 .233 0 0 0 0 0
31 Welsh, GeorgeGeorge Welsh[21] 1973–81 102 55 46 1 .544 1 2 0 3 –
1978 Holiday Bowl,
1980 Garden State Bowl,
1981 Liberty Bowl
0
32 Tranquill, GaryGary Tranquill 1982–86 55 20 34 1 .373 0 0 0 0 0
33 Uzelac, ElliotElliot Uzelac 1987–89 33 8 25 0 .242 0 0 0 0 0
34 Chaump, GeorgeGeorge Chaump 1990–94 55 14 41 0 .255 0 0 0 0 0
35 Weatherbie, CharlieCharlie Weatherbie
[A 8]
1995–2001 75 30 45 0 .400 1 0 0 1 –
1996 Aloha Bowl
0
Int Lantz, RickRick Lantz
[A 8]
2001 3 0 3 .000 0 0 0 0
36 Johnson, PaulPaul Johnson
[A 2]
2002–07 74 45 29 .608 2 2 5 –
2003 Houston Bowl,
2004 Emerald Bowl,
2005 Poinsettia Bowl,
2006 Meineke Car Care Bowl,
2007 Poinsettia Bowl
0
37 Niumatalolo, KenKen Niumatalolo
[A 2]
2007–current 78 48 30 .615 2 4 6 –
2007 Poinsettia Bowl,
2008 EagleBank Bowl,
2009 Texas Bowl,
2010 Poinsettia Bowl,
2012 Fight Hunger Bowl,
2013 Armed Forces Bowl
0
Ken Niumatalolo in a black suit
Ken Niumatalolo, who has led Navy to six bowl games in seven years and serves as the current head coach.
Wayne Hardin talking with a player
Wayne Hardin led Navy to two bowl games and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame for his coaching career.
Two of Navy's winningest coaches, with 48 and 38 wins, respectively.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Vauix Carter was a player-coach who led Navy in only one game, an 8-0 shutout of Johns Hopkins.[8]
  2. ^ a b c Paul Johnson coached Navy for the entirety of the 2007 season, but left to coach the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets before 2007 Poinsettia Bowl. Offensive coordinator Ken Niumatalolo took over coaching duties for the bowl game, and continues to lead the team.[24][25]
  3. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "N/A" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record.
  4. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[10]
  5. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[11][12]
  6. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[13]
  7. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2013–14 college football season.[3]
  8. ^ a b Charlie Weatherbie was fired as head coach on October 28, 2001, after losing 17 of his last 18 games. Defensive coordinator Rick Lantz was named as the interim head coach, but was fired at the end of the season, after going 0–3.[22][23]

References[edit]

General
  • Naval Academy Athletic Association (2012). "Navy Bowl Game History" (PDF). 2012 Navy Midshipmen Football Media Guide. United States Naval Academy Athletics. Archived from the original on November 11, 2012. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  • Naval Academy Athletic Association (2005). "Navy: Football History" (PDF). 2005 Navy Midshipmen Football Media Guide. United States Naval Academy Athletics. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  • Staff (2013). "Navy Coaching Records". Navy History. College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on December 14, 2013. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
Notes
  1. ^ Wagner, Bill (January 3, 2013). "Navy still considers Big East a good fit". The Capital Gazette (Glen Burnie, MD). OCLC 20603859. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ Markus, Don (December 13, 2012). "Navy, bound for Big East football in 2015, will wait to review 'all the moving parts'". The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, MD). ISSN 2165-1752. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Navy Coaching Records (2013)
  4. ^ Fienstein, John (November 24, 2013). "Navy football deserves salute for success under Ken Niumatalolo, Paul Johnson". The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.). ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  5. ^ General Accounting Office (June 30, 1941). "(B-12199) Subsistence and Lodging–Naval Reserve Midshipmen Attending a University". Decisions of the Comptroller General of the United States (Government Printing Office) 20: 142–145. ISSN 0011-7323. Retrieved February 19, 2014. 
  6. ^ Melling, George (August 22, 1922). "Sec. 1512. [Title of Students.] The students at the Naval Academy shall be styled cadet midshipmen". Laws Relating To The Navy, Annotated (Government Printing Office) (238): 739–741. OCLC 3852139. Retrieved February 19, 2014. 
  7. ^ Staff (2013). "U.S. Naval Academy Facts, Figures and History". Traditions. United States Naval Academy Athletics. Midshipmen. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  8. ^ Patterson, Ted (2000). Football in Baltimore: History and Memorabilia. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 22. ISBN 0-8018-6424-0. 
  9. ^ Navy Football History (2005)
  10. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  11. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  12. ^ "2009-10 NCAA Football Rules and Interpretation" (PDF). Rule 3, Article 3: Extra Periods. National Collegiate Athletic Association. May 2009. pp. FR–64 to FR–65. Archived from the original on July 2, 2010. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  13. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  14. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Art "Doc" Hillebrand". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  15. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Gil "Gloomy Gil" Dobie". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  16. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Bill Ingram". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  17. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Edgar "Rip" Miller". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  18. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Tom Hamilton". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  19. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: George Sauer". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  20. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: Wayne Hardin". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  21. ^ Staff (2013). "Member Biography: George Welsh". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  22. ^ Baker, Kent (October 30, 2001). "Lantz gets his chance at Navy with promotion". The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore). ISSN 2165-1752. Retrieved December 26, 2013. 
  23. ^ Staff writer (October 29, 2001). "Plus: College Football; Weatherbie Fired As Navy Coach". The New York Times (New York City). Sports. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 26, 2013. 
  24. ^ Associated Press (December 8, 2007). "Niumatalolo follows Johnson at Navy". Sports Illustrated (New York City). ISSN 0038-822X. Archived from the original on December 10, 2007. Retrieved December 26, 2013. 
  25. ^ Staff writer (December 7, 2007). "Paul Johnson Named Georgia Tech's Head Football Coach". Ramblinwreck.com (Atlanta, GA). Retrieved December 26, 2013.