List of Nebraska Cornhuskers head football coaches

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Bo Pelini, hired after the 2007 season, is the current head coach of the Cornhuskers.

The Nebraska Cornhuskers football program is a college football team that represents the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the Legends Division of the Big Ten Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team has had 31 head coaches since organized football began in 1890. The university adopted the nickname Cornhuskers in 1900. Prior to that, the team was also known as the Old Gold Knights, Antelopes, Rattlesnake Boys and Bugeaters.[1][2] The Cornhuskers have played 1,219 games during their 120 seasons. In those seasons, seven coaches have led the Cornhuskers to postseason bowl games: Biff Jones, Bill Glassford, Bob Devaney, Tom Osborne, Frank Solich, Bill Callahan, and Bo Pelini. Twelve coaches have won conference championships with the Cornhuskers: Frank Crawford, Charles Thomas, Robbie Robinson, W. C. Cole, Ewald O. Stiehm, E. J. Stewart, Fred Dawson, Ernest Bearg, Dana X. Bible, Jones, Devaney, Osborne, and Frank Solich

Osborne is the all-time leader in games coached (307), years coached (25) and wins (255). Williams and Langdon Frothingham are tied with the highest winning percentage. Williams won his only game as head coach and Frothingham won his two games. Among coaches with at least a full season of coaching, Stiehm's winning percentage of .913 is the highest. Adolph J. Lewandowski and A. Edwin Branch each have a winning percentage of .250, the lowest of all Nebraska coaches. Of the 31 Cornhusker coaches, six have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Robinson, Fielding H. Yost, Bible, Jones, Devaney, and Osborne. The current coach, Bo Pelini, was hired in December 2007.[3]

Key[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Statistics correct as of the end of week #1 of the 2013–14 college football season
# Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs NCs Awards
1 Frothingham, LangdonLangdon Frothingham 1890 !1890 2 2 0 0 1.000
2 Lyman, T. U.T. U. Lyman 1891 !1891 2 1 1 0 .500
3 Williams, J. S.J. S. Williams 1892 !1892 1 1 0 0 1.000 1 1 1 .500
4 Crawford, FrankFrank Crawford 1893 !1893–1894 15 10 4 1 .700 3 3 0 .500 1
5 Thomas, CharlesCharles Thomas 1895 !1895 9 6 3 0 .667 2 1 0 .667 1
6 Robinson, Eddie N.Eddie N. Robinson 1896 !1896–1897 16 11 4 1 .719 4 1 1 .750 1
7 Yost, Fielding H.Fielding H. Yost 1898 !1898 11 8 3 0 .727
8 Branch, Alonzo EdwinAlonzo Edwin Branch 1899 !1899 10 2 7 1 .250
9 Booth, Walter C.Walter C. Booth 1900 !1900–1905 63 53 8 2 .857
10 Foster, AmosAmos Foster 1906 !1906 10 6 4 0 .600
11 Cole, W. C.W. C. Cole 1907 !1907–1910 36 25 8 3 .736 5 2 1 .688 2
12 Stiehm, Ewald O.Ewald O. Stiehm 1911 !1911–1915 40 35 2 3 .913 14 0 1 .967 5
13 Stewart, E. J.E. J. Stewart 1916 !1916–1917 15 11 4 0 .733 5 1 0 .833 2
14 Kline, William G.William G. Kline 1918 !1918 6 2 3 1 .500
15 Schulte, HenryHenry Schulte 1919 !1919–1920 17 8 6 3 .559
16 Dawson, FredFred Dawson 1921 !1921–1924 32 23 7 2 .750 14 1 2 .882 3
17 Bearg, ErnestErnest Bearg 1925 !1925–1928 33 23 7 3 .742 16 4 1 .786 1
18 Bible, Dana X.Dana X. Bible 1929 !1929–1936 72 50 15 7 .743 33 3 4 .875 6
19 Jones, BiffBiff Jones 1937 !1937–1941 46 28 14 4 .652 17 6 2 .720 0 1 2
20 Presnell, GlennGlenn Presnell 1942 !1942 10 3 7 0 .300 3 2 0 .600
21 Lewandowski, Adolph J.Adolph J. Lewandowski 1943 !1943–1944 16 4 12 0 .250 4 6 0 .400
22 Clark, GeorgeGeorge Clark 1945 !1945, 1948 19 6 13 0 .316 4 7 0 .364
23 Masterson, BernardBernard Masterson 1946 !1946–1947 18 5 13 0 .278 5 5 0 .500
24 Glassford, BillBill Glassford 1949 !1949–1955 68 31 35 3 .471 23 18 1 .560 0 1
25 Elliott, PetePete Elliott 1956 !1956 10 4 6 0 .400 3 3 0 .500
26 Jennings, BillBill Jennings 1957 !1957–1961 50 15 34 1 .310 6 19 0 .240
27 Devaney, BobBob Devaney 1962 !1962–1972 123 101 20 2 .829 62 14 1 .812 6 3 8 2 – 1970, 1971

Walter Camp Coach of the Year (1971)[6]
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year (1971)[7]

28 Osborne, TomTom Osborne 1973 !1973–1997 307 255 49 3 .836 153 22 1 .872 12 13 13 3 – 1994, 1995, 1997

Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award (1978)[8]
AFCA Coach of the Year (1994)[9]

29 Solich, FrankFrank Solich 1998 !1998–2003 77 58 19 .753 33 15 .688 3 3 1
30 Callahan, BillBill Callahan 2004 !2004–2007 49 27 22 .551 15 17 .469 1 1
31 Pelini, BoBo Pelini[A 4] 2008 !2008–present 90 65 25 .722 37 15 .712 4 3

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Nebraska was a member of the Western Interstate University Football Association from 1892 until 1897. They remained independent until joining the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. During World War I in 1918, the school left the conference, but rejoined in 1921. The conference was renamed the Big Six Conference in 1928, the Big Seven Conference in 1948, and the Big Eight Conference in 1960. The membership of the Big Eight Conference, along with four teams formerly of the Southwest Conference, were absorbed into the new Big 12 Conference in 1996. Following the 2010 season, the Cornhuskers joined the Big Ten Conference.
  2. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[4]
  3. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[5]
  4. ^ Pelini also served as an interim head coach in 2003 winning the Alamo Bowl, the final game of the season. This win is reflected in his statistics.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Origin of the Cornhusker Nickname". Huskers.com. NU Media Relations. 2009-07-26. 
  2. ^ Wojciechowski, Gene (2001-11-26). "Spurrier Misses the Point, Even If He Has One". ESPN the Magazine. Archived from the original on 2010-01-28. 
  3. ^ Christopherson, Brian (2007-12-01). "Pelini returns to NU as head coach". Lincoln Journal Star. Archived from the original on 2010-01-28. Retrieved 2010-01-28. 
  4. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (2006-08-25). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. Archived from the original on 2009-11-24. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  5. ^ Finder, Chuck (1987-09-06). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2009-10-22. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  6. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation Awards". Walter Camp Football Foundation, Inc. Archived from the original on 2010-02-04. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  7. ^ "Football Writers Name Devaney Coach Of Year". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. 1972-01-05. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 
  8. ^ "Past Winners". Bobby Dodd National Coach of the Year Award. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 
  9. ^ "AFCA Coach of the Year Award - Past Winners". American Football Coaches Association. 2008-01-15. Retrieved 2010-02-03.