List of New York Mets seasons

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The exterior of a baseball stadium, which has a round brown entrance area with a white and orange "citiFIELD" on top.
Citi Field is the home stadium of the Mets.

The New York Mets are an American professional baseball team based in Flushing, Queens, New York City. They compete in the East Division of Major League Baseball's (MLB) National League (NL). The team's current home stadium is Citi Field, after playing two years at the Polo Grounds and forty-five years at Shea Stadium.[1] Since their inception in 1962, the Mets have won two World Series titles and four NL championships. As of the end of the 2013 season, the Mets have won more than 3,900 regular season games, a total that ranks 20th among MLB teams and fourth among expansion teams.[2]

The Mets lost 120 games in their inaugural season, the most by a post-1900 MLB team.[3] After six more years in which their best league finish was ninth, the Mets won the World Series in 1969, defeating the Baltimore Orioles in five games to earn what is widely considered one of the biggest upsets in baseball history.[4][5] Four seasons later, the Mets returned to the World Series, where they lost to the Oakland Athletics in seven games. After winning two NL championships in five years, New York struggled for the next decade, not coming within 10 games of the NL East leader until 1984.

In 1986, the team posted 108 wins, the most in franchise history, and defeated the Houston Astros in the National League Championship Series (NLCS) to advance to the World Series. Trailing three games to two in the series, the Mets were one out from defeat in game six before coming back to win 6–5; they won game seven two days later to earn their second World Series championship.[6] After a second-place finish in 1987, the Mets won the NL East the next year, but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NLCS. The Mets' next playoff appearances were their back-to-back wild card-winning seasons of 1999 and 2000; in the latter year, they won their fourth NL championship, but lost to the cross-town New York Yankees in the "Subway Series".[7] The most recent playoff appearance for the Mets came in 2006, when the St. Louis Cardinals defeated them in the NLCS. In 2007 and 2008, the team was eliminated from playoff contention on the last day of the regular season.[8]

Table key[edit]

A man walking with a hand in his pocket. He is wearing a black and orange baseball cap and jacket.
Catcher Gary Carter played six seasons for the Mets, and was a member of the 1986 World Series-winning team.[9]
CPOY
Comeback Player of the Year
CYA
Cy Young Award
Finish
Final position in league or division
GB
"Games back" from first-place team[a]
Losses
Number of regular season losses
Mets season
Each year is linked to an article about that particular Mets season
MLB season
Each year is linked to an article about that particular MLB season
NLCS
National League Championship Series
NLDS
National League Division Series
ROY
National League Rookie of the Year
Wins
Number of regular season wins
WSMVP
World Series Most Valuable Player Award


Year by year[edit]

Note: Statistics are correct as of September 29, 2013.

World Series champions
(1962–present) †
National League champions
(1962–present) *
Division champions
(1969–present) ^
Wild card berth
(1994–present) ¤
New York Mets yearly win–loss records, with league/division standings, playoff results, and award winners
MLB season Mets season League Division Finish Wins Losses Win% GB Playoffs Awards
1962 1962 NL 10th 40 120 .250 60½
1963 1963 NL 10th 51 111 .315 48
1964 1964 NL 10th 53 109 .327 40
1965 1965 NL 10th 50 112 .309 47
1966 1966 NL 9th 66 95 .410 28½
1967 1967 NL 10th 61 101 .377 40½ Tom Seaver (ROY)[10]
1968 1968 NL 9th 73 89 .451 24
1969 1969 NL* East[b]^ 1st 100 62 .617 Won NLCS vs. Atlanta Braves, 3–0
Won World Series vs. Baltimore Orioles, 4–1
Tom Seaver (CYA)[11]
Tommie Agee (CPOY)[12]
Donn Clendenon (WSMVP)[13]
1970 1970 NL East 3rd 83 79 .512 6
1971 1971 NL East 3rd 83 79 .512 14
1972[c] 1972 NL East 3rd 83 73 .532 13½ Jon Matlack (ROY)[10]
1973 1973 NL* East^ 1st 82 79 .509 Won NLCS vs. Cincinnati Reds, 3–2
Lost World Series to Oakland Athletics, 4–3
Tom Seaver (CYA)[11]
1974 1974 NL East 5th 71 91 .438 17
1975 1975 NL East 3rd 82 80 .506 10½ Tom Seaver (CYA)[11]
1976 1976 NL East 3rd 86 76 .531 15
1977 1977 NL East 6th 64 98 .395 37
1978 1978 NL East 6th 66 96 .407 24
1979 1979 NL East 6th 63 99 .389 35
1980 1980 NL East 5th 67 95 .414 24
1981[d] 1981 NL East 5th 41 62 .398 18½
1982 1982 NL East 6th 65 97 .401 27
1983 1983 NL East 6th 68 94 .420 22 Darryl Strawberry (ROY)[10]
1984 1984 NL East 2nd 90 72 .556 Dwight Gooden (ROY)[10]
1985 1985 NL East 2nd 98 64 .605 3 Dwight Gooden (CYA)[11]
1986 1986 NL* East^ 1st 108 54 .667 Won NLCS vs. Houston Astros, 4–2
Won World Series vs. Boston Red Sox, 4–3
Ray Knight (CPOY), (WSMVP)[14][15]
1987 1987 NL East 2nd 92 70 .568 3
1988 1988 NL East^ 1st 100 60 .625 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles Dodgers, 4–3
1989 1989 NL East 2nd 87 75 .537 6
1990 1990 NL East 2nd 91 71 .562 4
1991 1991 NL East 5th 77 84 .478 20½
1992 1992 NL East 5th 72 90 .444 24
1993 1993 NL East 7th 59 103 .364 38
1994[e] 1994 NL East 3rd 55 58 .487 18½
1995[f] 1995 NL East 2nd 69 75 .479 21
1996 1996 NL East 4th 71 91 .438 25
1997 1997 NL East 3rd 88 74 .543 13
1998 1998 NL East 2nd 88 74 .543 18
1999 1999 NL East 2nd[g]¤ 97 66 .595 Won NLDS vs. Arizona Diamondbacks, 3–1
Lost NLCS to Atlanta Braves, 4–2
Rickey Henderson (CPOY)[16]
2000 2000 NL* East 2nd¤ 94 68 .580 1 Won NLDS vs. San Francisco Giants, 3–1
Won NLCS vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 4–1
Lost World Series to New York Yankees, 4–1
2001 2001 NL East 3rd 82 80 .506 6
2002 2002 NL East 5th 75 86 .466 26½
2003 2003 NL East 5th 66 95 .410 34½
2004 2004 NL East 4th 71 91 .438 25
2005 2005 NL East 3rd 83 79 .512 7
2006 2006 NL East^ 1st 97 65 .599 Won NLDS vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, 3–0
Lost NLCS to St. Louis Cardinals, 4–3
2007 2007 NL East 2nd 88 74 .543 1
2008 2008 NL East 2nd 89 73 .549 3
2009 2009 NL East 4th 70 92 .432 23
2010 2010 NL East 4th 79 83 .488 18
2011 2011 NL East 4th 77 85 .475 25
2012 2012 NL East 4th 74 88 .457 24 R.A. Dickey (CYA)[11]
2013 2013 NL East 3rd 74 88 .457 22

All-time records[edit]

New York Mets all-time win–loss records
Statistic Wins Losses Win%
New York Mets regular season record (1962–2012) 3,959 4,325 .478
New York Mets postseason record (1962–2012) 43 31 .581
All-time regular and postseason record 4,002 4,356 .479

Notes[edit]

  • a This is determined by calculating the difference in wins plus the difference in losses divided by two.
  • b In 1969, the National League split into East and West divisions.[17]
  • c The 1972 Major League Baseball strike forced the cancellation of the Mets' first six games of the season.[18]
  • d The 1981 Major League Baseball strike caused the season to be split into two halves.[19] The Mets finished with a 17–34 record in the first half of the season, and a fifth-place finish in the National League East. After the strike was resolved, the team had a 24–28 record in the second half, placing them fourth in the division.[20]
  • e The 1994 Major League Baseball strike, which started on August 12, led to the cancellation of the rest of the season.[18]
  • f The 1994 MLB strike lasted until April 2, causing the 1995 season to be shortened to 144 games.[18]
  • g The Mets finished the 1999 season tied with the Cincinnati Reds for the National League wild card playoff berth. In a one-game tie-breaker, the Mets defeated the Reds 5–0 to win the wild card.[21]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums, and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Complete Baseball Teams and Baseball Team Encyclopedias". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  3. ^ Donovan, John (September 4, 2003). "The (dis)honor roll: Tigers have plenty of company among all-time worst teams". CNN Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  4. ^ "List: Biggest baseball playoff upsets". ESPN. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  5. ^ Leggett, William (October 27, 1969). "Never Pumpkins Again". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  6. ^ Fimrite, Ron (November 3, 1986). "Good To The Very Last Out". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 8, 2009. 
  7. ^ Johnson, Dirk (October 25, 2000). "Baseball: Subway Series; New York Swaggers, But America Shrugs". The New York Times. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  8. ^ Matuszewski, Erik (September 29, 2008). "Mets Fall Short of Playoffs Again as Brewers Claim NL Wild Card". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  9. ^ "Gary Carter". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 22, 2009. 
  10. ^ a b c d "Rookie of the Year winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Cy Young Award winners". Major League Baseball. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  12. ^ Leggett, William (June 15, 1970). "A Boo-boo Or Baby For Bowie". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  13. ^ "Donn Clendenon". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  14. ^ "Sports People; Coming and Goings". The New York Times. December 2, 1986. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  15. ^ "Ray Knight". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  16. ^ Hermoso, Rafael (October 19, 1999). "Orel Says America's Behind Us". New York Daily News. Retrieved April 19, 2009. 
  17. ^ Leggett, William (April 14, 1969). "One Hundred And One". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 1, 2009. 
  18. ^ a b c "Baseball stoppages date back to 1972". ESPN. Associated Press. August 29, 2002. Retrieved April 20, 2009. 
  19. ^ "Scorecard". Sports Illustrated. October 5, 1981. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  20. ^ "1981 Season". ESPN. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  21. ^ Battista, Judy (October 5, 1999). "The Mets Erase Cincinnati, the Doubts and Frustration". The New York Times. Retrieved April 20, 2009.