List of New York Yankees seasons

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A baseball stadium with blue seats and buildings visible in the background.
The Yankees have played home games in the current Yankee Stadium since 2009.

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the Bronx, a borough of New York City, New York. Also known as "the Bronx Bombers" and "the Pinstripers",[1][2] the Yankees play in the East Division of Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL). In its 113 major league seasons, the franchise has won 27 World Series championships, the most of any MLB team and 16 more than the second-place St. Louis Cardinals.[3] The Yankees played home games in Yankee Stadium from 1923 to 2008, except for a stint at Shea Stadium from 1974 to 1975 while Yankee Stadium was undergoing renovations.[4] In 2009, the team moved into a new ballpark, which is also called Yankee Stadium.[5]

One of the American League's eight original members, the club was founded in Baltimore, Maryland as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, and posted a 68–65 win–loss record in its first season.[6] The franchise moved to New York City in 1903 and became known as the New York Highlanders; in 1913, the team changed its name to the Yankees.[7] From 1920 to 1964, the Yankees were the most successful MLB franchise, winning 20 World Series titles and 29 AL pennants. This period included streaks of four consecutive championships from 1936 to 1939 and five straight titles from 1949 to 1953.

Following an 11-year playoff drought, the club appeared in the playoffs five times in a six-year period and won back-to-back World Series championships in 1977 and 1978. The Yankees won the World Series again in 1996, and in 1998 began a run of three consecutive Series titles. From 1995 to 2007, the Yankees made the playoffs each year; their 13-season postseason streak was the second-longest in MLB history.[8] After missing the playoffs in 2008, they won another World Series in 2009 and reached the postseason each year from 2010 to 2012, before failing to qualify in 2013. Overall, the Yankees' .568 regular season winning percentage is the highest of any MLB team, and they have the eighth-most regular season wins, behind seven clubs founded in the 19th century.[9]

Table key[edit]

Two men smiling and holding a baseball bat, with a child next to them. Several seated men are sitting behind them, in front of grandstands.
Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig led the Murderers' Row teams of the late 1920s.
ALCS
American League Championship Series
ALDS
American League Division Series
ASGMVP
All-Star Game Most Valuable Player
CPOY
Comeback Player of the Year
CYA
Cy Young Award
Finish
Final position in league or division
GB
"Games back" from first-place team[a]
Losses
Number of regular season losses
MOY
Manager of the Year
MVP
Most Valuable Player
ROY
American League Rookie of the Year
Season
Each year is linked to an article about that particular MLB season
Wins
Number of regular season wins
WSMVP
World Series Most Valuable Player
Yankees season
Each year is linked to an article about that particular Yankees season


Year by year[edit]

World Series champions
(1903–present) †
American League champions
(1901–present)[b] *
Division champions
(1969–present) ^
Wild Card berth
(1994–present) ¤
MLB season Yankees season League Division Finish Wins Losses Win% GB[c] Playoffs Awards
1901 1901 AL 5th 68 65 .511 13½
1902 1902 AL 8th 50 88 .362 34
1903 1903 AL 4th 72 62 .537 17
1904 1904 AL 2nd 92 59 .609
1905 1905 AL 6th 71 78 .477 21½
1906 1906 AL 2nd 90 61 .596 3
1907 1907 AL 5th 70 78 .473 21
1908 1908 AL 8th 51 103 .331 39½
1909 1909 AL 5th 74 77 .490 23½
1910 1910 AL 2nd 88 63 .583 14½
1911 1911 AL 6th 76 76 .500 25½
1912 1912 AL 8th 50 102 .329 55
1913 1913 AL 7th 57 94 .377 38
1914 1914 AL 6th 70 84 .455 30
1915 1915 AL 5th 69 83 .454 32½
1916 1916 AL 4th 80 74 .519 11
1917 1917 AL 6th 71 82 .464 28½
1918 1918 AL 4th 60 63 .488 13½
1919 1919 AL 3rd 80 59 .576
1920 1920 AL 3rd 95 59 .617 3
1921 1921 AL * 1st 98 55 .641 Lost World Series to New York Giants, 5–3[10]
1922 1922 AL * 1st 94 60 .610 Lost World Series to New York Giants, 4–0–1[d][11]
1923 1923 AL * 1st 98 54 .645 Won World Series vs. New York Giants, 4–2[12] Babe Ruth (MVP)[13]
1924 1924 AL 2nd 89 63 .586 2
1925 1925 AL 7th 69 85 .448 28½
1926 1926 AL * 1st 91 63 .591 Lost World Series to St. Louis Cardinals, 4–3[14]
1927 1927 AL * 1st 110 44 .714 Won World Series vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 4–0[15] Lou Gehrig (MVP)[16]
1928 1928 AL * 1st 101 53 .656 Won World Series vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 4–0[17]
1929 1929 AL 2nd 88 66 .571 18
1930 1930 AL 3rd 86 68 .558 16
1931 1931 AL 2nd 94 59 .614 13½
1932 1932 AL * 1st 107 47 .695 Won World Series vs. Chicago Cubs, 4–0[e][18]
1933 1933 AL 2nd 91 59 .607 7
1934 1934 AL 2nd 94 60 .610 7
1935 1935 AL 2nd 89 60 .597 3
1936 1936 AL * 1st 102 51 .667 Won World Series vs. New York Giants, 4–2[19] Lou Gehrig (MVP)[20]
1937 1937 AL * 1st 102 52 .662 Won World Series vs. New York Giants, 4–1[21]
1938 1938 AL * 1st 99 53 .651 Won World Series vs. Chicago Cubs, 4–0[22]
1939 1939 AL * 1st 106 45 .702 Won World Series vs. Cincinnati Reds, 4–0[23] Joe DiMaggio (MVP)[20]
1940 1940 AL 3rd 88 66 .571 2
1941 1941 AL * 1st 101 53 .656 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–1[24] Joe DiMaggio (MVP)[20]
1942 1942 AL * 1st 103 51 .669 Lost World Series to St. Louis Cardinals, 4–1[25] Joe Gordon (MVP)[20]
1943 1943 AL * 1st 98 56 .636 Won World Series vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 4–1[26] Spud Chandler (MVP)[20]
1944 1944 AL 3rd 83 71 .539 6
1945 1945 AL 4th 81 71 .533
1946 1946 AL 3rd 87 67 .565 17
1947 1947 AL * 1st 97 57 .630 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3[27] Joe DiMaggio (MVP)[20]
1948 1948 AL 3rd 94 60 .610
1949 1949 AL * 1st 97 57 .630 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–1[28]
1950 1950 AL * 1st 98 56 .636 Won World Series vs. Philadelphia Phillies, 4–0[29] Phil Rizzuto (MVP)[20]
1951 1951 AL * 1st 98 56 .636 Won World Series vs. New York Giants, 4–2[30] Yogi Berra (MVP)[20]
Gil McDougald (ROY)[31]
1952 1952 AL * 1st 95 59 .617 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3[32]
1953 1953 AL * 1st 99 52 .656 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–2[33]
1954 1954 AL 2nd 103 51 .669 8 Yogi Berra (MVP)[20]
Bob Grim (ROY)[31]
1955 1955 AL * 1st 96 58 .623 Lost World Series to Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3[34] Yogi Berra (MVP)[20]
1956 1956 AL * 1st 97 57 .630 Won World Series vs. Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3[f][35] Mickey Mantle (MVP)[20]
Don Larsen (WSMVP)[36]
1957 1957 AL * 1st 98 56 .636 Lost World Series to Milwaukee Braves, 4–3[37] Mickey Mantle (MVP)[20]
Tony Kubek (ROY)[31]
1958 1958 AL * 1st 92 62 .597 Won World Series vs. Milwaukee Braves, 4–3[38] Bob Turley (CYA, WSMVP)[36][39]
1959 1959 AL 3rd 79 75 .513 15
1960 1960 AL * 1st 97 57 .630 Lost World Series to Pittsburgh Pirates, 4–3[40] Roger Maris (MVP)[20]
Bobby Richardson (WSMVP)[36]
1961 1961 AL * 1st 109 53 .673 Won World Series vs. Cincinnati Reds, 4–1[41] Roger Maris (MVP)[20]
Whitey Ford (CYA, WSMVP)[36][39]
1962 1962 AL * 1st 96 66 .593 Won World Series vs. San Francisco Giants, 4–3[42] Mickey Mantle (MVP)[20]
Tom Tresh (ROY)[31]
Ralph Terry (WSMVP)[36]
1963 1963 AL * 1st 104 57 .646 Lost World Series to Los Angeles Dodgers, 4–0[43] Elston Howard (MVP)[20]
1964 1964 AL * 1st 99 63 .611 Lost World Series to St. Louis Cardinals, 4–3[44]
1965 1965 AL 6th 77 85 .475 25
1966 1966 AL 10th 70 89 .440 26½
1967 1967 AL 9th 72 90 .444 20
1968 1968 AL 5th 83 79 .512 20 Stan Bahnsen (ROY)[31]
1969 1969 AL East[g] 5th 80 81 .497 28½
1970 1970 AL East 2nd 93 69 .574 15 Thurman Munson (ROY)[31]
1971 1971 AL East 4th 82 80 .506 21
1972[h] 1972 AL East 4th 79 76 .510
1973 1973 AL East 4th 80 82 .494 17
1974 1974 AL East 2nd 89 73 .549 2
1975 1975 AL East 3rd 83 77 .519 12
1976 1976 AL * East ^ 1st 97 62 .610 Won ALCS vs. Kansas City Royals, 3–2
Lost World Series to Cincinnati Reds, 4–0[45]
Thurman Munson (MVP)[20]
Dock Ellis (CPOY)[46]
1977 1977 AL * East ^ 1st 100 62 .617 Won ALCS vs. Kansas City Royals, 3–2
Won World Series vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, 4–2[47]
Sparky Lyle (CYA)[39]
Reggie Jackson (WSMVP)[36]
1978 1978 AL * East ^ 1st[i] 100 63 .613 Won ALCS vs. Kansas City Royals, 3–1
Won World Series vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, 4–2[48]
Ron Guidry (CYA)[39]
Bucky Dent (WSMVP)[36]
1979 1979 AL East 4th 89 71 .556 13½
1980 1980 AL East ^ 1st 103 59 .636 Lost ALCS to Kansas City Royals, 3–0[49]
1981[j] 1981 AL * East ^ 1st 34 22 .607 Won ALDS vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 3–2
Won ALCS vs. Oakland Athletics, 3–0
Lost World Series to Los Angeles Dodgers, 4–2[50]
Dave Righetti (ROY)[31]
6th 25 26 .490 5
1982 1982 AL East 5th 79 83 .488 16
1983 1983 AL East 3rd 91 71 .562 7
1984 1984 AL East 3rd 87 75 .537 17
1985 1985 AL East 2nd 97 64 .602 2 Don Mattingly (MVP)[20]
1986 1986 AL East 2nd 90 72 .556
1987 1987 AL East 4th 89 73 .549 9
1988 1988 AL East 5th 85 76 .528
1989 1989 AL East 5th 74 87 .460 14½
1990 1990 AL East 7th 67 95 .414 21
1991 1991 AL East 5th 71 91 .438 20
1992 1992 AL East 4th 76 86 .469 20
1993 1993 AL East 2nd 88 74 .543 7
1994[k] 1994 AL East 1st 70 43 .619 Buck Showalter (MOY)[51]
1995[l] 1995 AL East 2nd ¤ 79 65 .549 7 Lost ALDS to Seattle Mariners, 3–2[52]
1996 1996 AL * East ^ 1st 92 70 .568 Won ALDS vs. Texas Rangers, 3–1
Won ALCS vs. Baltimore Orioles, 4–1
Won World Series vs. Atlanta Braves, 4–2[53]
Derek Jeter (ROY)[31]
Joe Torre (MOY)[51]
John Wetteland (WSMVP)[36]
1997 1997 AL East 2nd ¤ 96 66 .593 2 Lost ALDS to Cleveland Indians, 3–2[54]
1998 1998 AL * East ^ 1st 114 48 .704 Won ALDS vs. Texas Rangers, 3–0
Won ALCS vs. Cleveland Indians, 4–2
Won World Series vs. San Diego Padres, 4–0[55]
Joe Torre (MOY)[51]
Scott Brosius (WSMVP)[36]
1999 1999 AL * East ^ 1st 98 64 .605 Won ALDS vs. Texas Rangers, 3–0
Won ALCS vs. Boston Red Sox, 4–1
Won World Series vs. Atlanta Braves, 4–0[56]
Mariano Rivera (WSMVP)[36]
2000 2000 AL * East ^ 1st 87 74 .540 Won ALDS vs. Oakland Athletics, 3–2
Won ALCS vs. Seattle Mariners, 4–2
Won World Series vs. New York Mets, 4–1[57]
Derek Jeter (ASGMVP, WSMVP)[36][58]
2001 2001 AL * East ^ 1st 95 65 .594 Won ALDS vs. Oakland Athletics, 3–2
Won ALCS vs. Seattle Mariners, 4–1
Lost World Series to Arizona Diamondbacks, 4–3[59]
Roger Clemens (CYA)[39]
2002 2002 AL East ^ 1st 103 58 .640 Lost ALDS to Anaheim Angels, 3–1[60]
2003 2003 AL * East ^ 1st 101 61 .623 Won ALDS vs. Minnesota Twins, 3–1
Won ALCS vs. Boston Red Sox, 4–3
Lost World Series to Florida Marlins, 4–2[61]
2004 2004 AL East ^ 1st 101 61 .623 Won ALDS vs. Minnesota Twins, 3–1
Lost ALCS to Boston Red Sox, 4–3[62]
2005 2005 AL East ^ 1st[m] 95 67 .586 Lost ALDS to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, 3–2[63] Alex Rodriguez (MVP)[20]
Jason Giambi (CPOY)[64]
2006 2006 AL East ^ 1st 97 65 .599 Lost ALDS to Detroit Tigers, 3–1[65]
2007 2007 AL East 2nd ¤ 94 68 .580 2 Lost ALDS to Cleveland Indians, 3–1[66] Alex Rodriguez (MVP)[20]
2008 2008 AL East 3rd 89 73 .549 8
2009 2009 AL * East ^ 1st 103 59 .636 Won ALDS vs. Minnesota Twins, 3–0
Won ALCS vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, 4–2
Won World Series vs. Philadelphia Phillies, 4–2[67]
Hideki Matsui (WSMVP)[36]
2010 2010 AL East 2nd ¤ 95 67 .586 1 Won ALDS vs. Minnesota Twins, 3–0
Lost ALCS to Texas Rangers, 4–2
2011 2011 AL East ^ 1st 97 65 .599 Lost ALDS to Detroit Tigers, 3–2
2012 2012 AL East ^ 1st 95 67 .586 Won ALDS vs. Baltimore Orioles, 3–2
Lost ALCS to Detroit Tigers, 4–0
2013 2013 AL East 3rd[n] 85 77 .525 12

These statistics are from Baseball-Reference's New York Yankees History & Encyclopedia,[68] except where noted, and are current as of September 29, 2013.

All-time records[edit]

Statistic Wins Losses Win%
Baltimore Orioles regular season record (1901–1902) 118 153 .435
New York Highlanders/Yankees regular season record (1903–present) 9829 7417 .570
All-time regular season record (1901–present) 9947 7570 .568
All-time postseason record (1901–present) 223 154 .592
All-time regular and postseason record (1901–present) 10170 7724 .568

Notes[edit]

  • a This is determined by calculating the difference in wins plus the difference in losses divided by two.
  • b For lists of all American League pennant winners, see American League pennant winners 1901–68 and American League Championship Series.
  • c Half-game increments are possible because games can be cancelled due to rain. If a postponed game is the last of the season between two teams in one of their stadiums, it may not be made up if it does not affect the playoff race.[69]
  • d The second game of the series ended after 10 innings due to darkness, with the score tied 2–2.[70]
  • e During Game 3 of this series, Babe Ruth hit his called shot, a home run into the center field bleachers of Wrigley Field.[71]
  • f Don Larsen pitched the only perfect game in World Series history in Game 5.[72]
  • g In 1969, the American League split into East and West divisions.[73]
  • h The 1972 Major League Baseball strike forced the cancellation of the Yankees' first seven games of the season.[74]
  • i The Yankees finished the season tied for first with the Boston Red Sox. New York defeated the Red Sox 5–4 in a one-game playoff to clinch the division title. The game is best remembered for Bucky Dent's three-run home run in the seventh inning, which gave the Yankees a 3–2 lead.[75]
  • j The 1981 Major League Baseball strike caused the season to be split into two halves. The Yankees were given a berth in an expanded playoff tournament because they led the American League East when the strike began. The Milwaukee Brewers finished the second half in first place to earn the division's other playoff berth.[76]
  • k The 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike, which started on August 12, 1994, led to the cancellation of the playoffs and World Series.[77] As a result of the abbreviated season, MLB did not officially award division championships.[78] The Yankees led the American League East, and held the best record in the American League, at the time of the strike,[79]
  • l The 1994–95 MLB strike lasted until April 2, 1995, causing the shortening of the 1995 season to 144 games.[74]
  • m The Yankees finished the season tied for first with the Boston Red Sox, but were awarded the division title because they won the season series with the Red Sox.[80]
  • n The Yankees finished the season tied for third with the Baltimore Orioles.[81]

References[edit]

General
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