List of Nobel laureates affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania

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Twenty-eight Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania. Pictured is the statue of Benjamin Franklin, the founder of the University of Pennsylvania, in front of College Hall.

The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Karolinska Institute, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[1] They were established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, which dictates that the awards should be administered by the Nobel Foundation. Another prize, the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, was established in 1968 by the Sveriges Riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, for contributors to the field of economics.[2] Each prize is awarded by a separate committee; the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awards the Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, and Economics, the Karolinska Institute awards the Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee awards the Prize in Peace.[3] Each recipient receives a medal, a diploma and a cash prize that has varied throughout the years.[2] In 1901, the winners of the first Nobel Prizes were given 150,782 SEK, which is equal to 7,731,004 SEK in December 2007. In 2008, the winners were awarded a prize amount of 10,000,000 SEK.[4] The awards are presented in Stockholm in an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death.[5]

As of 2013, there have been 28 laureates affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, 8 alone in the last 10 years. The University of Pennsylvania considers laureates who attended the university as undergraduate students, graduate students or were members of the faculty as affiliated laureates.[6] Otto Fritz Meyerhof, a research professor in physiological chemistry, was the first University of Pennsylvania laureate, winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1922.[7] Two Nobel Prizes were shared by University of Pennsylvania laureates; Ragnar Granit and Haldan Keffer Hartline won the 1967 Nobel Prize in Chemistry,[8] and Alan J. Heeger, Alan MacDiarmid and Hideki Shirakawa won the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.[9] Three laureates, Christian B. Anfinsen, Gerald Edelman, and John Robert Schrieffer, won different Nobel Prizes in 1972, and were awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree in 1973.[6] Nine University of Pennsylvania laureates have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, more than any other category.[6]

Laureates[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Category Rationale
1922 Otto Fritz Meyerhof.jpg Meyerhof, Otto FritzOtto Fritz Meyerhof Research Professor in Physiological Chemistry, 1940–1951 Physiology or Medicine "for his discovery of the fixed relationship between the consumption of oxygen and the metabolism of lactic acid in the muscle"[7]
1938 Richard Kuhn ETH-Bib Dia 248-065.jpg Kuhn, RichardRichard Kuhn Visiting Research Professor for Physiological chemistry Physiology or Medicine "for his work on carotenoids and vitamins"[10]
1955 du Vigneaud, VincentVincent du Vigneaud Assistant in Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, 1924–1925 Chemistry "for his work on sulphur compounds, especially the first synthesis of a polypeptide hormone"[11]
1961 Robert Hofstadter.jpg Hofstadter, RobertRobert Hofstadter Research Fellow, 1939–1940; Physics Instructor, 1940–1941 Physics "for his pioneering studies of electron scattering in atomic nuclei and for his thereby achieved discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleons"[12]
1964 Martin Luther King Jr NYWTS.jpg King, Jr., Martin LutherMartin Luther King, Jr. Graduate Student, 1950–51 Nobel Peace Prize for being "the first person in the Western world to have shown us that a struggle can be waged without violence."[13]
1967 Ragnar Granit.jpg Granit, RagnarRagnar Granit Research Fellow, 1929–1931; Sc.D., 1971 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye"[8]
1967 Hartline, Haldan KefferHaldan Keffer Hartline Research Fellow in Biophysics, 1931–1936; Assistant Professor, 1936–1942; Associate Professor, 1943–1948; Professor, 1948–1949; Sc.D., 1971 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye"[8]
1971 Kuznets, SimonSimon Kuznets Assistant Professor of Economic Statistics, 1930–1934; Associate Professor, 1934–1935; Professor, 1936–1954; Sc.D., 1956; LL.D., 1976 Economics "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development."[14]
1972 Christian B. Anfinsen, NIH portrait, 1969.jpg Anfinsen, Christian B.Christian B. Anfinsen M.S., 1939; Sc.D., 1973 Chemistry "for his work on ribonuclease, especially concerning the connection between the amino acid sequence and the biologically active conformation"[15]
1972 Edelman, GeraldGerald Edelman M.D., 1954; Sc.D., 1973 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies"[16]
1972 John Robert Schrieffer.jpg Schrieffer, John RobertJohn Robert Schrieffer Professor of Physics, 1962–1980; Sc.D., 1973 Physics "for their jointly developed theory of superconductivity, usually called the BCS-theory"[17]
1976 Baruch Samuel Blumberg by Tom Trower (NASA).jpg Blumberg, Baruch SamuelBaruch Samuel Blumberg Professor of Medicine, 1964– ;Sc.D., 1990 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning new mechanisms for the origin and dissemination of infectious diseases"[18]
1980 Klein, LawrenceLawrence Klein Professor of Economics, 1958– Economics "for the creation of econometric models and the application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies."[19]
1985 Mike Brown 2003.jpg Brown, Michael StuartMichael Stuart Brown A.B., 1962; M.D., 1966; Sc.D. 1986 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the regulation of cholesterol metabolism"[20]
1997 Prusiner 1.JPG Prusiner, Stanley B.Stanley B. Prusiner A.B., 1964; M.D., 1968 Physiology or Medicine "for his discovery of Prions - a new biological principle of infection"[21]
1999 Ahmed Zewail.jpg Zewail, AhmedAhmed Zewail Ph.D., 1974; Sc.D. 1997 Chemistry "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy"[22]
2000 Heeger, Alan J.Alan J. Heeger Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, 1962–1982 Chemistry "for their discovery and development of conductive polymers"[9]
2000 MacDiarmid, AlanAlan MacDiarmid Department of Chemistry, 1955– ; Blanchard Professor of Chemistry, 1988– Chemistry "for their discovery and development of conductive polymers"[9]
2000 Shirakawa, HidekiHideki Shirakawa Department of Chemistry, Post-Doctoral Researcher, 1976 Chemistry "for their discovery and development of conductive polymers"[9]
2002 Raymond Davis, Jr 2001.jpg Davis, Jr., RaymondRaymond Davis, Jr. Professor, 1985–2006 Physics "for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, in particular for the detection of cosmic neutrinos"[23]
2004 Nobel2004chemistrylaurets-Rose.jpg Rose, IrwinIrwin Rose Professor of Physical Biochemistry, 1971– Chemistry "for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation"[24]
2004 Edward C. Prescott.jpg Prescott, Edward C.Edward C. Prescott Assistant Professor, 1967–1971 Economics "for their contributions to dynamic macroeconomics: the time consistency of economic policy and the driving forces behind business cycles."[25]
2006 Edmund Phelps 2008-01-23.jpg Phelps, EdmundEdmund Phelps Professor, 1966–1971 Economics "for his analysis of intertemporal tradeoffs in macroeconomic policy."[26]
2008 Harald zur Hausen-press conference Dec 06th, 2008-6.jpg zur Hausen, HaraldHarald zur Hausen Assistant professor, 1968–1969[27] Physiology or Medicine "for his discovery of human papilloma viruses causing cervical cancer"[28]
2009 Nobel Prize 2009-Press Conference KVA-24.jpg E. Smith, GeorgeGeorge E. Smith B.S., 1955 Physics "for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor"[29]
2009 Nobel Prize 2009-Press Conference KVA-42.jpg E. Williamson, OliverOliver E. Williamson Professor, 1965–1983 Economics "for his analysis of economic governance, especially the boundaries of the firm"[30]
2010 Ei-ichi Negishi 3.jpg Negishi, Ei'ichiEi'ichi Negishi Ph.D., 1963 Chemistry "for palladium-catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis"[31]
2011 Nobel Prize 2011-Press Conference KVA-DSC 7770.jpg Sargent, Thomas J.Thomas J. Sargent Professor, 1970–1971 Economics "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy"

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  2. ^ a b "The Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  3. ^ "The Nobel Prize Awarders". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. [dead link]
  4. ^ "The Nobel Prize Amounts". Nobel Foundation. Archived from the original on 2008-07-31. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  5. ^ "The Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies". Nobel Foundation. Archived from the original on 2008-08-22. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  6. ^ a b c "Nobel Laureates at Penn". University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  7. ^ a b "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1922". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  8. ^ a b c "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1967". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  9. ^ a b c d "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2000". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  10. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1938". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2010-10-04. 
  11. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1955". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  12. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1961". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-09. 
  13. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1964". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-11-12. 
  14. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1971". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1972". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  16. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1972". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  17. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1972". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  18. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1976". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  19. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1980". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  20. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1980". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  21. ^ "Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1997". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  22. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1999". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  23. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  24. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  25. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2004". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  26. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2006". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 
  27. ^ zur Hausen, Harald. "Curriculum Vitae". Retrieved 2008-10-24. [dead link]
  28. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  29. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2009". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-10-06. 
  30. ^ Sveriges Riksbank's Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2009. Sveriges Riksbank. 12 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-12. 
  31. ^ The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2010. Nobel Foundation. 6 October 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-06. 

External links[edit]