List of North Carolina hurricanes (2000–present)

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Aerial view of a barrier island, temporarily separated into two segments.
New inlet created by Hurricane Isabel

North Carolina is a U.S. state located on the Atlantic Seaboard in the southeastern United States. Tropical cyclonesstorms characterized by a large low-pressure center and numerous thunderstorms that produce strong winds and heavy rain—regularly affect the state. According to statistical hurricane research between 1886 and 1996 by the North Carolina State Climatology Office, a tropical cyclone makes landfall along the coastline about once every four years. An estimated 17.5% of all North Atlantic tropical cyclone have affected the state.[1]

This list documents 48 tropical cyclones known to have affected the state between 2000 and the present. The most active month is September, with 20 total storms, while May and November are tied for the least active months with two storms each. While the most destructive and intense storm was Hurricane Isabel in 2003, Tropical Storm Allison in 2001 caused the most fatalities. The first storm to impact the state during the period was Hurricane Florence in September 2000, and the most recent was Hurricane Arthur in July 2014. In terms of windspeeds, Hurricane Isabel was the strongest storm to affect the state, producing maximum sustained winds equivalent to Category 2 status on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale.[2]

2000–2002[edit]

  • September 12, 2000 – Rip currents from Hurricane Florence kill three people due to drowning.[3]
  • September 19, 2000 – The extratropical remnants of Hurricane Gordon track through the state, dropping light to moderate rainfall.[4]
  • September 23, 2000 – Tropical Depression Helene re-intensifies into a tropical storm over the northeastern portion of the state, producing moderate rainfall across much of the state which peaks at 8.31 inches (211 mm) in Longwood.[4]
  • June 13, 2001 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Allison enter the state as a subtropical depression and drop over 10 inches (250 mm) of rainfall in the northeastern portion of the state; the rainfall results in nine indirect deaths due to traffic accidents on slick roads.[5]
  • August 8, 2001 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Barry drop light rainfall in the state's mountainous region.[6]
  • July 14, 2002 – Tropical Storm Arthur forms just offshore and drops light rainfall near the coast.[4]
  • September 10, 2002 – Tropical Storm Gustav strikes the Outer Banks with a 5-foot (1.5 m) storm surge and hurricane force wind gusts, causing minor damage.[7]
  • September 15, 2002 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Hanna drop moderate rainfall across much of the state, causing some flooding in Wilmington.[8]
  • September 27, 2002 – The large wind field of what was once Hurricane Isidore downs trees and power lines across the western portion of the state, which blocks numerous roads.[9]
  • October 11, 2002 – Tropical Storm Kyle makes landfall near Long Beach, spawning an F2 tornado in Pantego and a few weaker tornadoes. The passage of the storm results in about a dozen damaged or destroyed houses, but no deaths or injuries in the state.[10]

2003–2004[edit]

A partially destroyed house, with most of its roof and attic gone, is surrounded by scattered debris.
Tornado damage from Hurricane Ivan
  • August 3, 2004 – Hurricane Alex brushes the Outer Banks, producing strong waves and moderate storm surge flooding; one person is killed from the surf, and hundreds of vehicles and homes are flooded.[18]
  • August 13, 2004 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Bonnie spawn an F2 tornado near Rocky Point, killing three people; the tornado also destroys 17 houses and severely damages 27 buildings.[19]
  • August 14, 2004 – Hurricane Charley moves ashore just southwest of the North Carolina – South Carolina border, resulting in moderate winds and about $25 million in damage as it tracks across the eastern portion of the state.[20]
  • August 30, 2004 – Tropical Depression Gaston traverses the state, bringing moderate precipitation which causes some flooding.[21]
  • September 8, 2004 – Former Hurricane Frances crosses the western portion of the state, dropping very heavy rainfall peaking at 23.6 inches (599 mm) on Mount Mitchell.[4] The rainfall causes widespread flooding, with many creeks and rivers surpassing flood stage; hundreds of homes and businesses are damaged or destroyed.[22]
  • September 17, 2004 – Former Hurricane Ivan tracks along the border between North Carolina and Tennessee, dropping heavy rainfall that peaks at 17.0 inches (432 mm) in Cruso, as well as producing 4 tornadoes in the state. The hurricane kills eight people in the state,[23] and causes severe flooding just nine days after the previous cyclone tracked through the area; the flooding damage or destroy hundreds of buildings, and washes away several bridges.[24]
  • September 25, 2004 – Heavy surf from Hurricane Jeanne kills a man to the east of Oak Island after he is thrown overboard from his boat.[25] Three days later the storm's remnants cross the western portion of the state, causing the third flood in a month; the flood from Jeanne is less severe and shorter in duration than that from Ivan and Frances.[26]

2005–2007[edit]

Satellite image of a tropical cyclone near the United States east coast. It presents a pronounced eye feature.
Hurricane Ophelia just off North Carolina
  • June 12, 2005 – Tropical Depression Arlene passes west of the state, producing locally heavy rainfall peaking at 9.84 inches (250 mm) in Transylvania County.[4]
  • July 7, 2005 – The remnants of Hurricane Cindy spawn eight tornadoes in the state, including one near Harmony that damages or destroys over a dozen structures.[27][28]
  • July 11, 2005 – Tropical Depression Dennis passes through Tennessee, with its large circulation dropping moderate to heavy precipitation in western North Carolina.[4]
  • August 30, 2005 – The remnants of Hurricane Katrina produce moderate rainfall and gusty winds in the western portion of the state.[4][29]
  • September 14 – September 16, 2005 – Hurricane Ophelia drifts just offshore of the Outer Banks, dropping heavy rainfall peaking at 17.5 inches (445 mm) and causing $70 million in damage.[30]
  • October 7, 2005 – Tropical Storm Tammy drops light rainfall in the southern portion of the state,[4] and later combines with another disturbance to cause widespread flooding.[31]
  • October 23, 2005 – The outer rainbands of Hurricane Wilma drop over 3 inches (75 mm) of precipitation in the Outer Banks.[32]
A road entirely submerged with murky flood waters.
Flooding in North Carolina from Tropical Storm Alberto
  • June 14, 2006 – The remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto cross the state, producing heavy rainfall peaking at 7.16 inches (182 mm) in Raleigh;[4] the rain causes one indirect death when a boy runs into a flooded drainage system and drowns.[33]
  • September 1, 2006 – Tropical Storm Ernesto makes landfall on Oak Island and floods dozens of houses due to heavy rainfall; damage is estimated at over $20 million, primarily from crop damage.[34]
  • May 7, 2007 – The precursor to Subtropical Storm Andrea produces rough waves along the state's coastline, causing moderate damage along the Outer Banks and killing four people in a boat offshore.[35]
  • June 3, 2007 – The extratropical remnants of Tropical Storm Barry crosses the eastern portion of the state and drops light rainfall.[4]
  • August 22, 2007 – Light rainfall occurs in association with the remnants of Tropical Storm Erin passing through the area.[36]
  • September 9, 2007 – Tropical Storm Gabrielle moves ashore on the Cape Lookout National Seashore, producing locally heavy rainfall but causing little damage.[37]
  • September 15, 2007 – The remnants of Hurricane Humberto drop light rainfall across much of the state before dissipating over the Appalachian Mountains.[38]
  • November 3, 2007 – Moderate winds from the extratropical remnants of Hurricane Noel leave about 6,000 people without power in the state.[39]

2008–present[edit]

  • July 12, 2008 – Offshore Hurricane Bertha contributes to rip currents along the coast, leading to dozens of lifeguard rescues.[40]
  • July 20, 2008 – Tropical Storm Cristobal passes just offshore, dropping light rainfall and causing minor flooding.[41]
  • September 5, 2008 – Hurricane Hanna moves ashore near the South Carolina – North Carolina border, packing strong winds and torrential rains.[42] Aside from minor structural damage, the storm's effects were generally minor.[43]
  • May 27, 2009 – The precursor to Tropical Depression One passes just to the east of the state's coastline, triggering shower activity and increased wind.[44]
  • August 22, 2009 – Category 4 Hurricane Bill churns the Atlantic and generates long periods of rough surf and rip currents throughout the region. In North Carolina, numerous rescues are performed.[45]
  • August 28, 2009 – Rip currents from Tropical Storm Danny result in the death of a 12 year-old boy.[46]
  • November 12, 2009 – The remnants of Hurricane Ida contribute to the formation of a strong and damaging extratropical cyclone along the U.S. East Coast.[47] Heavy rainfall, up to 14.03 inches (356 mm) in Manteo, occurs in portions of the state.[4]
  • August 7, 2010 - Rip currents from Tropical Storm Colin kill a 51-year-old man off the coast of Ocracoke.[48]
  • September 3, 2010 - Hurricane Earl passes just east of the Outer Banks, inundating portions of North Carolina Highway 12 with storm surge and producing hurricane force wind gusts that severely damaged six houses. Moderate crop damage was reported further inland, and monetary damage in the state reached $2.5 million (2010 USD).[49]
  • September 19, 2010 - A surfer dies in strong waves from Hurricane Igor in Surf City.[50]
  • August 27, 2011 - Hurricane Irene makes landfall in Cape Lookout as a strong Category 1 storm, causing seven total casualties as well as severe wind and flood damage.[51]
  • October 26–30, 2012 - Hurricane Sandy passed by the state, dropping heavy rains and making storm surge.
  • July 3-4, 2014 - Hurricane Arthur hits eastern North Carolina, in particular the Outer Banks, with 100 mph winds.

Monthly statistics[edit]

Number of recorded storms affecting North Carolina
Month Number of storms
May
2
June
4
July
8
August
10
September
20
October
3
November
2

Deadly storms[edit]

Total deaths
Name Year Number of deaths
Bill 2003 1
Fabian 2003 1
Jeanne 2004 1
Alberto 2006 1
Danny 2009 1
Colin 2010 1
Igor 2010 1
Florence 2000 3
Bonnie 2004 3
Andrea 2007 4
Irene 2011 7
Ivan 2004 8
Allison 2001 9

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ State Climate Office of North Carolina (2006). "Hurricanes in North Carolina". Retrieved 2008-04-03. 
  2. ^ Hurricane Research Division (2008). "Chronological List of All Hurricanes which Affected the Continental United States: 1851–2007". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2010-04-12. 
  3. ^ James Franklin (2000). "Hurricane Florence Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Roth, David M; Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. "Tropical Cyclone Rainfall in the Southeastern United States". Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Point Maxima. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Retrieved June 5, 2012. 
  5. ^ Stacy Stewart (2001). "Tropical Storm Allison Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  6. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Barry". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  7. ^ Jack Beven (2003). "Hurricane Gustav Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  8. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2002). "Event Report for Tropical Storm Hanna". Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  9. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2002). "Event Report for Tropical Depression Isidore". Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  10. ^ Stacy Stewart (2002). "Hurricane Kyle Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  11. ^ Lixion Avila (2003). "Tropical Storm Bill Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  12. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Depression Seven (2003)". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  13. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Grace". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  14. ^ Richard Pasch, et al. (2003). "Hurricane Fabian Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  15. ^ Jack Beven & Hugh Cobb (2003). "Hurricane Isabel Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  16. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2003). "Hurricane Isabel Event Report". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  17. ^ Fred Hurteau (2003). "The Dynamic Landscape of the Outer Banks". Outer Banks Guidebook. Retrieved 2006-12-05. 
  18. ^ James Franklin (2004). "Hurricane Alex Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  19. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Tropical Storm Bonnie Event Report". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  20. ^ Richard Pasch, et al. (2004). "Hurricane Charley Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  21. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Event Report for Hurricane Gaston". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  22. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Event Report for Hurricane Frances". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  23. ^ Stacy Stewart (2004). "Hurricane Ivan Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  24. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Event Report for Hurricane Ivan". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  25. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Event Report for Hurricane Jeanne". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  26. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2004). "Event Report for Hurricane Jeanne (2)". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  27. ^ Stacy Stewart (2006). "Hurricane Cindy Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  28. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Event Report for Hurricane Cindy". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  29. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Event Report for Hurricane Katrina". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  30. ^ Jack Beven & Hugh Cobb. "Hurricane Ophelia Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  31. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2005). "Event Report for Tropical Storm Tammy". Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  32. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Wilma". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  33. ^ Lixion Avila & Daniel Brown (2006). "Tropical Storm Alberto Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  34. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2006). "Event Report for Hurricane Ernesto". Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  35. ^ Jamie Rhome, et al. (2007). "Subtropical Storm Andrea Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  36. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Tropical Storm Erin". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  37. ^ Daniel Brown (2007). "Tropical Storm Gabrielle Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  38. ^ David Roth (2007). "Rainfall Summary for Hurricane Humberto". Hydrometeorological Prediction Center. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  39. ^ Anne Leake (2007). "Outer Banks Get Wind, Little Rain From Storm". WRAL.com. Retrieved 2007-11-04. 
  40. ^ "Event Report for Hurricane Bertha". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  41. ^ Estes Thompson (2008). "Tropical Storm Cristobal brushes NC coast". Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2008-08-01. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  42. ^ "Event Report for Hurricane Hanna". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2009-12-22. 
  43. ^ "Event Report for Hurricane Hanna (2)". National Climatic Data Center. 2008. Retrieved 2009-12-22. 
  44. ^ "History for Hatteras, NC: May 27, 2009 Weather". Weather Underground. 2008-05-27. Retrieved 2009-05-28. 
  45. ^ "Event Report for Hurricane Bill". National Climatic Data Center. 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  46. ^ Jeff Hampton and Patrick Wilson (2009). "Coast Guard ends search for boy missing off Corolla". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved 2010-02-02. [dead link]
  47. ^ Lixion A. Avila and John Cangialosi (2009). "Hurricane Ida Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  48. ^ Staff Writer (August 9, 2010). "Maryland man drowns in North Carolina". WVEC. Retrieved August 9, 2010. 
  49. ^ Cole (2010-09-11). "Post Tropical Cyclone Report...Hurricane Earl...Updated". Newport/Morehead City, NC National Weather Service. Retrieved 2010-09-20. 
  50. ^ Matt Tomsic (2010-09-19). "http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20100919/ARTICLES/100919571/-1/business?Title=Surfer-hospitalized-after-rescue-at-Surf-City". Star News Online. Retrieved 2010-09-20. 
  51. ^ accuweather (2011-08-28). "Damage from Irene Assessed by North Carolina Governor". accuweather.