List of Ohio-class submarines

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Surfaced submarine in bay with mountains in the background. Flanked to its starboard side by a tug, the boat has several people standing atop of it.
USS Louisiana, the last of the Ohio class, arrives at Naval Base Kitsap, Washington (2005).

Named after its lead boat, the Ohio class of nuclear-powered submarines is, as of January 2014, serving with its sole operator, the United States Navy. Fourteen of the eighteen boats are ballistic missile submarines (SSBN), which, along with U.S. Air Force strategic bombers and intercontinental ballistic missiles, constitute the nuclear-deterrent triad of the U.S.[1] The remaining four have been converted from their initial roles as SSBNs to cruise-missile carriers (SSGN). The Ohio-class boats, each displacing 18,750 tons submerged, are the third largest submarines in the world, behind the 48,000-ton Typhoon class[2] and 24,000-ton Borei class[3] of the Russian Navy. The Ohio class replaced the Benjamin Franklin- and Lafayette-class SSBNs.[4]

The Ohio class was designed in the 1970s to carry the concurrently-designed Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile. Both variants of the Tridents—the UGM-96 Trident I and the UGM-133 Trident II—are propelled by three-stage solid propellant rockets and are equipped with 8–14 nuclear warheads.[5] The 73,000 lb (33,100 kg) UGM-96, with a range of 4,000 mi (6,400 km), served from October 1979, starting with the Benjamin Franklin-class USS Francis Scott Key, until 2006.[5] The 130,000 lb (59,000 kg) UGM-133, with a range of 6,000 mi (9,700 km), is in service as of 2014, having been introduced in 1990 with USS Tennessee.[5][6] The primary self-defense weapon of the class is the Mk 48 ADCAP torpedo.[4] Ohio-class submarines that carry ballistic missiles receive orders from the United States Strategic Command based in Nebraska.[7]

In 1994, the Nuclear Posture Review study determined that, of the 18 Ohio SSBNs the U.S. Navy would be operating in total, 14 would be sufficient for the strategic needs of the U.S. The decision was made to convert four Ohio-class boats into SSGNs capable of conducting conventional land attack and special operations. As a result, the four oldest boats of the class—Ohio, Michigan, Florida, and Georgia—progressively entered the conversion process in late 2002 and were returned to active service by 2008.[8] The boats could thereafter carry 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles and 66 special operations personnel, among other capabilities and upgrades.[8] The cost to refit the four boats was around US$1 billion (2008 dollars) per vessel.[9]

With the first retirement of an Ohio-class boat scheduled for 2029, the U.S. Navy is currently, as of January 2014, undertaking a program tentatively named SSBN-X to study the prospective replacement of the class.[10][11]

Boats[edit]

In July 1974, General Dynamics Electric Boat was awarded the contract to construct the Ohio-class submarines.[4] The first of the class, USS Ohio, was laid down in 1976. Due to an unspecified "series of unfortunate problems in Washington D.C."[4] and manufacturing issues, Ohio did not initiate sea trials until June 1981, setting back the boat's commissioning date to November that year, three years behind schedule.[4] Originally, it was decided that 20 boats were to be built, but due to the 1991 START I agreement between the U.S. and Soviet Union, the U.S. agreed to reduce the number of nuclear warheads it could deploy, and thus rationalized its order to 18 boats.[6] The last boat of the class, USS Louisiana, was commissioned in September 1997,[12] nearly 16 years after the class entered operational service. Originally designed for 30-year service lives, it was later decided that Ohio-class submarines would each serve for 42 years, comprising two periods of 20 years of operations and a two-year mid-life nuclear refueling.[9]

Line drawing of submarine with circled numbers denoting different submarine components and compartments.
Line drawing of the Ohio class in its original SSBN configuration. 1) Sonar dome 2) Main ballast tanks 3) Computer room 4) Integrated radio room 5) Sonar room 6) Command and control center 7) Navigation center 8) Missile control center 9) Engine room 10) Reactor compartment 11) Auxiliary machinery room no. 1 12) Crew's berthing 13) Auxiliary machinery room no. 2 14) Torpedo room 15) Wardroom 16) Chief petty officer quarters 17) Missile compartment

List[edit]

Keys

Note: The classification of the 18 boats into the two U.S. fleets is according to the latest updates of the Naval Vessel Register, and does not indicate previous boat transfers between the two fleets.

Boat Hull number UIC Picture Ordered Laid down Launched Delivered Commissioned Weapons Status Ref.
Ohio SSGN-726 (ex SSBN-726) dagger 21036 Submarine in drydock, surrounded by scaffolding and machinery. It is painted in two halves of orange and steel grey. 1 July 1974 10 April 1976 7 April 1979 28 October 1981 11 November 1981 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles; Mark 48 torpedoes[8] Reclassed to SSGN on 1 October 2002; in active service [13]
Michigan SSGN-727 (ex SSBN-727) dagger 21037 Submerged submarine moored in pier. Atop it are several people. 28 February 1975 4 April 1977 26 April 1980 28 August 1982 11 September 1982 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles; Mark 48 torpedoes Reclassed to SSGN on 1 January 2004; in active service [14]
Florida SSGN-728 (ex SSBN-728) * 21038 Submarine underway with a beach as a backdrop. Several people are standing atop of the boat. 28 February 1975 19 January 1981 14 November 1981 17 May 1983 18 June 1983 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles; Mark 48 torpedoes Reclassed to SSGN on 10 January 2002; in active service [15]
Georgia SSGN-729 (ex SSBN-729) * 21039 Submarine in port with an aircraft carrier in the background. 20 February 1976 7 April 1979 6 November 1982 17 January 1984 11 February 1984 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles; Mark 48 torpedoes Reclassed to SSGN on 1 March 2004; in active service [16]
Henry M. Jackson (ex Rhode Island) SSBN-730 dagger 21040 Submarine in bay with valleys and snow-capped mountains in the background. 6 June 1977 19 November 1981 15 October 1983 11 September 1984 16 October 1984 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes[17] In active service [18]
Alabama SSBN-731 dagger 21041 Aerial view of submarine running on surface; antennas are raised from the boat's sail. 27 February 1978 27 August 1981 19 May 1984 23 April 1985 25 May 1985 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [19]
Alaska SSBN-732 * 21042 Submarine running at high speed of surface, creating huge waves. Several people's heads pop up from the boat's sail. 27 February 1978 9 March 1983 12 January 1985 26 November 1985 25 January 1986 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [20]
Nevada SSBN-733 dagger 21043 Sideview of submarine on surface, with the outline of a city in the background. 7 January 1981 8 August 1983 14 September 1985 7 August 1986 16 August 1986 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [21]
Tennessee SSBN-734 * 21044 Submarine on surface, assisted by two colorful tugs. 7 January 1982 9 June 1986 13 December 1986 18 November 1988 17 December 1988 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [22]
Pennsylvania SSBN-735 dagger 21045 Submarine running on surface in the open seas, creating huge waves in the process. 29 November 1982 2 March 1987 23 April 1988 22 August 1989 9 September 1989 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [23]
West Virginia SSBN-736 * 21365 Submarine moored in pier, next to a moving tug. 21 November 1983 18 December 1987 14 October 1989 10 September 1990 20 October 1990 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [24]
Kentucky SSBN-737 dagger 21433 Submarine running on surface at high speed. Several people are on the sail, next to a US flag. 13 August 1985 18 December 1987 11 August 1990 27 June 1991 13 July 1991 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [25]
Maryland SSBN-738 * 21460 Three quarters back view of a submarine running on surface in a featureless sea. 14 March 1986 22 April 1986 10 August 1991 31 May 1992 13 June 1992 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [26]
Nebraska SSBN-739 dagger 21461 Submarine being assisted into a mooring position at a pier by a tug. 26 May 1987 6 July 1987 15 August 1992 18 June 1993 10 July 1993 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [27]
Rhode Island SSBN-740 * 21682 Three quarters view of submarine running on surface near land. 15 January 1988 15 September 1988 17 July 1993 22 June 1994 9 July 1994 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [28]
Maine SSBN-741 dagger 21826 Submarine executing a tight turn on surface, leaving behind a huge wake. 5 October 1988 3 July 1990 16 July 1994 21 June 1995 29 July 1995 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [29]
Wyoming SSBN-742 * 21846 View of front of submarine running on surface, with trees and land in the mid-ground. 18 October 1989 8 August 1991 15 July 1995 20 June 1996 13 July 1996 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [30]
Louisiana SSBN-743 dagger 21861 Surfaced submarine in bay with mountains in the background. Flanked to its starboard side by a tug, the boat has several people standing atop of it. 19 December 1990 23 October 1992 27 July 1996 14 August 1997 6 September 1997 24 UGM-133 Trident II SLBMs; Mark 48 torpedoes In active service [12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chinworth 2006, p. 2.
  2. ^ "941 Typhoon". Federation of American Scientists. Fas.org. 25 August 2000. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  3. ^ "935 Borei". Federation of American Scientists. Fas.org. 13 July 2000. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Chant 2005, p. 33.
  5. ^ a b c Chant 2005, pp. 42–43.
  6. ^ a b Chinworth 2006, p. 3.
  7. ^ Genat and Genat 1997, p. 39.
  8. ^ a b c "Guided Missile Submarines – SSGN". U.S. Navy. Navy.mil. 10 November 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  9. ^ a b O’Rourke, Ronald (22 May 2008). "Navy Trident Submarine Conversion (SSGN) Program: Background and Issues for Congress" (PDF). Congressional Research Service. Fas.org. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  10. ^ Grossman, Elaine M. (10 August 2010). "Future Navy Submarine to Stick With Nuclear Mission". Global Security Newswire (Nuclear Threat Initiative). Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  11. ^ Thompson, Loren (20 June 2011). "The Submarine That Might Save America". Forbes (Forbes.com). Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  12. ^ a b "USS Louisiana (SSBN 743)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 26 July 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  13. ^ "USS Ohio (SSGN 726)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  14. ^ "USS Michigan (SSGN 727)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 24 February 2006. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  15. ^ "USS Florida (SSGN 728)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 13 September 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  16. ^ "USS Georgia (SSGN 729)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 17 December 2007. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  17. ^ "Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarines – SSBN". U.S. Navy. Navy.mil. 20 November 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2012. 
  18. ^ "USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  19. ^ "USS Alabama (SSBN 731)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  20. ^ "USS Alaska (SSBN 732)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  21. ^ "USS Nevada (SSBN 733)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  22. ^ "USS Tennessee (SSBN 734)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 23 August 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  23. ^ "USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  24. ^ "USS West Virginia (SSBN 736)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 22 August 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  25. ^ "USS Kentucky (SSBN 737)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  26. ^ "USS Maryland (SSBN 738)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  27. ^ "USS Nebraska (SSBN 739)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  28. ^ "USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  29. ^ "USS Maine (SSBN 741)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 23 August 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 
  30. ^ "USS Wyoming (SSBN 742)". Naval Vessel Register. Navy.mil. 23 August 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 

Bibliography[edit]