List of Oslo Metro lines

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An open train station with three tracks and two side platforms filled with people. At each platform is parked a white three-car train.
Two MX3000 trains at Majorstuen
In the middle is a purple circle, with several branches sticking out. One line runs north, one line runs to the north-east and one line runs to the north-west. One line runs to the east that branches into three, two heading south and one east, and the final line runs west, with a short stretch branching off running above a short while.
A geographically accurate map of the metro, with important stations. All lines run through the Common Line, and lines 4 and 6 continue through the Ring Line, swapping service numbers.

The Oslo Metro is a rapid transit system serving Oslo and Bærum in Norway. The system is municipally-owned by Kollektivtransportproduksjon,[1] and operated by its subsidiary Oslo T-banedrift under contract to Ruter, the Oslo public transport authority.[2] The metro has a daily ridership of 200,000,[3] and serves 90 stations.[4] The system consists of eight lines that operate as branches from the Common Tunnel—the shared section that runs 4.8 kilometers (3.0 mi) through the city center.[5][6] In addition, the Ring Line operates in a loop north of the city center.[7] There are six train services, numbered 1 through 6, that each operate from one branch via the city center to another branch or to the Ring Line. All services run every 15 minutes. Each branch has one service that operates to its terminus, except for the Lambertseter Line that has two.[8][9]

The first part of the metro was the Holmenkollen Line, that opened as light rail in 1898.[10][11] The Røa Line followed as a branch in 1912.[12] The system became the first Nordic underground railway in 1928, when the underground line to Nationaltheatret was opened.[13] The Østensjø Line opened in 1923,[14] the Kolsås Line in 1924,[15] and the Sognsvann Line in 1934.[16] The Kolsås Line opened as an extension of the Lilleaker Line, but in 1942 it was connected to the Common Tunnel, while the rest of the Lilleaker Line remains as a light rail connected to the Oslo Tramway.[15] The opening of the upgraded metro system in the eastern boroughs occurred in 1966, after the conversion of the 1957 Lambertseter Line to metro standard. This involves the lines using third rail instead of overhead wires, having 110-meter (360 ft) long platforms and automatic train protection in-cab signaling.[17] It was followed by the conversion of the Østensjø Line, as well as the new Grorud Line and Furuset Line.[18] In 1993, trains could, for the first time, run through the city between the two networks in the Common Tunnel.[19] The latest extension is the 2006 opening of the Ring Line, that connects the eastern and western network north of the city center.[7]

Parts of the system have been upgraded from light rail to metro standard. The Østensjø and Lambertseter Lines were converted in 1966, when the first sections of new metro line were opened.[20] The Sognsvann and Røa Lines, as well as the western part of the Common Tunnel, were upgraded in 1993 and 1995.[21] The last two lines are closed and in the process of upgrade, with the Holmenkoll and Kolsås Lines planned to open in 2011 and 2014, respectively.[22][23] Following the upgrade, all T1000 stock can be retired and replaced by the new MX3000 trains.[24] The Grorud and Lambertseter Lines serve the Groruddalen valley while the Østensjø and Lambertseter Line serve the southern areas of Nordstrand.[25] These four lines have the highest ridership.[26] In the west, the Kolsås, Røa, Holmenkoll and Sognsvann Lines serves less densely populated areas. The Ring Line serves the northern borough of Nordre Aker, while the Common Tunnel serves the city center.[25]

List[edit]

An indoor train station with two tracks running down the center. There are concrete platforms on both sides, with some people waiting.
Underground section of the Common Tunnel at Tøyen Station
A double-track train line down the center of the image after emerging from a tunnel. The line is surrounded by houses and trees, and a white three-car train is halfway down the line on the right side.
An MX3000 train on the Østensjø Line
A double-track railway surrounded by trees runs down the middle of the image. On the left track is worn-looking red train. Above the tracks are overhead wires.
A T1300 train on the Kolsås Line, when the line was still light rail

The following table presents the ten lines of the Oslo Metro. They are chronologically sorted by the date of the first section of line to open.[27] The service column indicates which of the six numbered services operates on most of the lines.[9] Services are omitted from lines where they serve only one or two stations. The date indicates the official opening date of the line on the section noted in the fourth column. Sections with blue background indicate lines that were opened as tramways, while white background indicates the line was converted to or built as metro standard.[27] The length column indicates the total length of the line at the time of opening or upgrade, and the extension column indicates the length of the extension. The station column indicates the number of stations on the line after the opening of each extension or upgrade.[28][29][30][31] Unless specified otherwise, the lines are metro standard.

* Light rail
Line Service Opened Section Length Extension Stations
km mi km mi
Holmenkollen* 1 31 May 1898 MajorstuenBesserud* 6.3 3.9 6.3 3.9 14
16 May 1916 Besserud – Frognerseteren* 11.7 7.3 5.4 3.4 20
Røa 2 17 November 1912 Majorstuen – Smestad* 1.9 1.2 1.9 1.2 4
24 January 1935 Smestad – Røa* 4.8 3.0 2.9 1.8 10
22 December 1948 Røa – Grini* 5.7 3.5 0.9 0.6 12
3 December 1951 Grini – Lijordet* 6.9 4.3 1.2 0.75 14
16 November 1971 Lijordet – Østerås* 7.5 4.7 0.6 0.4 15
5 February 1992 Metro standard Lijordet – Østerås 10
Østensjø 3 18 December 1923 HelsfyrBrynseng* 0.8 0.5 0.8 0.5 2
10 January 1926 Brynseng – Oppsal* 4.0 2.5 3.2 2.0 4
20 July 1958 Oppsal – Bøler* 5.4 3.4 1.4 0.9 6
29 October 1967 Metro standard Tøyen – Bøler 7.1 4.4 1.7 1.1 8
26 November 1967 Bøler – Skullerud 9.2 5.7 2.1 1.3 10
4 January 1998 Skullerud – Mortensrud 11.5 7.1 2.3 1.4 11
Kolsås 6 3 November 1924 JarAvløs* 4.5 2.8 4.5 2.8 8
1 January 1930 Avløs – Kolsås* 7.8 4.8 3.3 2.1 12
15 June 1942 Jar – Sørbyhaugen* 11.8 7.3 4.0 2.5 17
20 August 2008 Metro standard HusebybakkenÅsjordet 2.3 1.4 3
Common 1 2 3 4 5 6 28 June 1928 Majorstuen – Nationaltheatret* 2.0 1.2 2.0 1.2 3
22 May 1966 TøyenJernbanetorget 1.6 1.0 1.6 1.0 3
9 January 1977 Jernbanetorget – Stortinget 2.1 1.3 0.5 0.3 4
6 March 1987 Stortinget – Nationaltheatret* 4.8 3.0 0.7 0.4 6
5 May 1992 Metro standard Stortinget – Majorstuen
Sognsvann 3 4 5 10 October 1934 FrøenSognsvann* 6.0 3.7 6.0 3.7 11
5 May 1992 Metro standard Majorstuen – Sognsvann 9
Lambertseter 1a 4 26 April 1957 Brynseng – Bergkrystallen* 5.9 3.7 5.9 3.7 8
22 May 1966 Metro standard Brynseng – Bergkrystallen
Grorud 5 16 October 1966 Tøyen – Grorud 9.2 5.7 9.2 5.7 11
3 March 1974 Grorud – Rommen 10.5 6.5 1.3 0.8 13
18 August 1974 Rommen – Stovner 12.2 7.6 1.7 1.1 14
21 December 1975 Stovner – Vestli 13.6 8.5 1.4 0.9 15
Furuset 2 18 November 1970 HellerudHaugerud 2.0 1.2 2.0 1.2 2
15 December 1974 Haugerud – Trosterud 2.9 1.8 0.9 0.6 3
19 February 1978 Trosterud – Furuset 5.3 3.3 2.4 1.5 5
8 November 1981 Furuset – Ellingsrudåsen 6.5 4.0 1.2 0.7 6
Ring 4 5 6 20 August 2003 Ullevål stadionStoro 3.3 2.1 3.3 2.1 2
21 August 2006 Storo – Carl Berners plass 5.0 3.1 1.2 0.7 3

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Saksfremlegg: Etablering av nytt felles administrasjonsselskap for kollektivtrafikken". Akershus Amtstidende (in Norwegian). 17 August 2007. Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  2. ^ "Administrasjon". Oslo T-banedrift (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  3. ^ Oslo T-banedrift (2007). "Årsrapport 2006" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  4. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 33
  5. ^ "T-banestasjonene i vest" (in Norwegian). Ruter. 11 March 2008. Retrieved 18 March 2009. [dead link]
  6. ^ "T-banestasjonene i øst" (in Norwegian). Ruter. 11 March 2008. Retrieved 18 March 2009. [dead link]
  7. ^ a b "Tidslinje" (in Norwegian). Ruter. 11 March 2008. Retrieved 18 March 2009. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Rutetider" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Ruter. 2009. Retrieved 13 November 2009. [dead link]
  9. ^ a b "Linjekart" (PDF). Ruter. 2008. Retrieved 18 March 2009. 
  10. ^ Ruter (11 March 2008). "Holmenkollbanenes stasjoner" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 March 2009. [dead link]
  11. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 8–9
  12. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 13
  13. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 17
  14. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 19
  15. ^ a b Aspenberg, 1994: 18
  16. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 16
  17. ^ Civitas (2006). "Kolsåsbanen i Bærum" (pdf) (in Norwegian). Akershus County Municipality. Retrieved 1 April 2009. 
  18. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 29
  19. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 30
  20. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 29–30
  21. ^ Aspenberg, 1994: 62
  22. ^ Juven, Olav (26 January 2009). "Holmenkollbanen under ombygging". Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (in Norwegian). Retrieved 28 March 2009. 
  23. ^ Juven, Olav and Bertheussen, Linn (18 March 2009). "Kolsåsbanen er reddet". Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (in Norwegian). Retrieved 1 April 2009. 
  24. ^ Ruter (10 March 2008). "MX3000 – nye T-banevogner" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 28 March 2009. [dead link]
  25. ^ a b Aspenberg, 1994: 32–33
  26. ^ Aspenberg, 1995: 39
  27. ^ a b Oslo T-banedrift (2007). "Kort historikk" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 28 March 2008. 
  28. ^ Ruter. "T-banestasjonene i øst" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 15 June 2008. Retrieved 30 March 2008. 
  29. ^ Ruter. "T-banestasjonene i vest" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 15 June 2008. Retrieved 30 March 2008. 
  30. ^ Oslo Package 2 (2001). "Fellesløft for bedre kollektivtransport Oslopakke 2" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 29 March 2009. 
  31. ^ Aspenberg, 1995: 28

Bibliography[edit]