List of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. managers

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This chronological list comprises all those who have held the position of manager of Paris Saint-Germain's first team from 1970, when the first professional manager was appointed, to the present day. Each manager's entry includes his dates of tenure and honours won while under his care. PSG have had 24 managers since the appointment of Pierre Phelipon in 1970. Paris Saint-Germain's most successful manager is Luis Fernández with five major trophies won: one French Cup, one League Cup, one Champions Trophy, one Cup Winners' Cup and one Intertoto Cup. He is also the club's longest-serving manager in terms of matches with 244. Luis Fernández and Georges Peyroche are the club's longest-serving managers in terms of time, both with 5 years in charge. Laurent Blanc is the current manager of Paris Saint-Germain.[1]

Peyroche, Houllier and first titles[edit]

Pierre Phelipon became the first ever coach of Paris Saint-Germain in 1970, replacing symbolic Stade Sangermanois coach Roger Quenolle. He alternated between coach and player to help out make a competitive team consisting of both amateur and professional players. Phelipon made the club attain top-tier status despite harsh relations between Parisians and Sangermanois, but quit in 1972. Robert Vicot became the sole coach of the club, until President Daniel Hechter put him alongside Just Fontaine. The duo achieved the club's promotion to the Division 1 in 1974, promoting attacking and seductive football. Vicot, however, quit the club and Fontaine continued his tenure at the capital club until 1976, when his relationship with Hechter deteriorated and had a disastrous end, with lawsuits and contractual disputes in the background. Velibor Vasović arrived with the objective of qualifying the club for a European Cup. Paris Saint-Germain narrowly missed out the UEFA Cup and he quit the club rejecting a new deal to stay. Jean-Michel Larqué ended his playing career and arrived as coach in 1977. He adopted a player-coach role due to the absence of a playmaker in the squad. PSG sat at the bottom of the table almost all the season and finished just over relegation. Pierre Alonzo was named his substitute, but his tenure was short-lived as Francis Borelli quickly replaced him with Velibor Vasović. The results weren't good and he left at the end of the season.[2] Georges Peyroche joined the club in 1979 and Paris Saint-Germain tasted their first honours with consecutive French Cup victories in 1982 and 1983. Suffering from stress, Peyroche took a sabbatical year. Lucien Leduc succeeded him and remained on the Parisian bench until 1984, when Peyroche returned to the club at the request of Borelli. He immediately qualified the club for the UEFA Cup, but the following season was a complete disappointment and Peyroche resigned midway through the campaign. Christian Coste replaced him as Paris Saint-Germain maintained Division 1 status and lost the French Cup Final against AS Monaco. Coste then became Gérard Houllier's assistant, before leaving the club in 1987.[3]

Jorge, Fernández and golden age[edit]

Gérard Houllier crowned Paris Saint-Germain as French champions in 1986, the first league title for the capital in 50 years. The rest of his tenure was not as successful and Erick Mombaerts replaced Houllier in 1988. His tenure, however, was short lived as Francis Borelli decided to reestablish Houllier during the winter break. The latter returned only to save the club from relegation. Tomislav Ivić was named coach and lost the league title in the last days of the season against eternal rivals Olympique de Marseille. The rest of his tenure proved to be a huge disappointment and Ivić left the club in 1990. Henri Michel replaced him and spent one season at the capital club.[3] Artur Jorge began his tenure at the capital in 1991 and Paris Saint-Germain achieved European qualification, the French Cup and the Division 1. PSG, however, failed to play attractive football and Jorge, who applied a more rigid strategic system, left the club in 1994. PSG's board saw in Luis Fernández the ideal manager to reform the image of the club. His first season in Paris was a success. Even though PSG was quickly outpaced in the Division 1 race by an irresistible Nantes side, Paris managed to win three domestic cups, the French Cup and League Cup and the Champions Trophy, and made an impressive showing in the UEFA Champions League concluded by elimination in the semi-finals against Milan. The strongest displays by Fernández's PSG were the quarter-finals win over Johan Cruyff's Barcelona. Beaten to the title once more in Division 1, Paris found the European competitions to be a breath of fresh-air and they won the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup after defeating Rapid Wien in the Final, making Fernández the first and only French manager to win a major European trophy. This prestigious victory was not enough to keep Fernández in the hotseat and left after only his second season at Paris Saint-Germain. Former PSG players Ricardo and Joël Bats returned to coach the capital club. They reached the Cup Winners' Cup Final in 1997 losing to Barcelona and won the domestic Cup double in 1998.[4]

Manager changes and cup specialists[edit]

President Charles Biétry handed Alain Giresse the coaching role. Despite claiming the Champions Trophy, he was fired as 1998 signalled the end of Paris Saint-Germain's dominance in the domestic game. Artur Jorge agreed to return to Paris, but this tenure wasn't as successful as his first stint and was fired in 1999. Assistant coach Philippe Bergeroo assumed the post as Paris Saint-Germain avoided relegation and qualified for the UEFA Champions League in the 1999-2000 season. A bad start to the 2000-01 season mixed with a crushing 5-1 defeat to Sedan saw him being replaced with none other than Luis Fernández. Even though he was in charge of a team with stars such as Jay-Jay Okocha, Nicolas Anelka and especially Ronaldinho, Fernández never got the results to satisfy the ambitions of the club. Despite support from fans with whom his popularity always remained very strong, he was fired in 2003 after being defeated by Auxerre in the French Cup Final. Fernández, however, added the UEFA Intertoto Cup to the club's shelf. Former PSG player Vahid Halilhodžić arrived as Paris Saint-Germain finished league runners-up, qualified for the Champions League and won the French Cup. Following a first round elimination from the Champions League and a streak of six league matches without a win, Halilhodžić was replaced by reserve team coach Laurent Fournier. He finished the season in a bright way and extended his contract with the club for another season. Although supported by the squad, he was replaced in strange circumstances by Guy Lacombe. President Pierre Blayau decided to fire him adducing underperformance, despite the fact that the club was third only one point behind the second. Six months after Guy Lacombe's arrival, Paris Saint-Germain won the French Cup against arch-rivals Marseille. New President Alain Cayzac extended Lacombe's deal. During the 2006–07 campaign, the club struggled with poor results and Lacombe was sacked in the winter break.[4]

Recent events[edit]

A member of PSG's golden era, Paul Le Guen returned to save the club from relegation. Paris were lying 17th in Ligue 1, but he led them to safety in his first season by finishing 15th.[5] Despite promising pre-season performances the 2007-08 season became a bad nightmare. PSG continued to lose momentum in the league eventually finishing 16th, just three points above the relegation zone. PSG nonetheless won the League Cup and reached the French Cup Final, losing to Ligue 1 champions Olympique Lyonnais. Alain Cayzac preferred to resign rather than extend Le Guen's contract, but new President Charles Villeneuve confirmed his confidence in Le Guen in May 2008. Despite a promising start to the 2008–09 season, it ended in general disappointment. Paris Saint-Germain failed to qualify for European action and finished 6th after fighting for the title throughout the season. The club was eliminated in the League Cup semi-finals and in the UEFA Cup quarter-finals.[4] Despite a redeeming campaign for the club, Paul Le Guen had conflicts with the club's management and the club announced that he would not be offered a new contract and would leave at the end of the season.[6] PSG then announced the signing of Antoine Kombouaré to the capital club for the next three seasons.[7]

List of managers[edit]

As of 26 May 2013.[1][8]
Name Period Matches Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD Win% [A] Trophies Notes
Domestic International
L1 L2 CF CL TC UCL CWC UEL UIC USC FCWC
France Pierre Phelipon 1970–72 74 30 22 22 112 96 +12 40.54
-
1971
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B][C]
France Robert Vicot 1972–75 131 66 33 32 267 178 +89 50.38
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Just Fontaine 1973–76 141 62 38 41 263 209 +54 43.97
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Velibor Vasović 1976–77,
1978–79
73 31 14 28 129 116 +13 42.47
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Jean-Michel Larqué 1977–78 48 17 11 20 88 81 +7 35.42
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
France Pierre Alonzo 1977,
1978,
1979–80
25 11 7 7 46 31 +15 44.00
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Georges Peyroche 1979–83,
1984–85
211 100 46 65 350 273 +77 47.39
-
-
1982, 1983
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Lucien Leduc 1983–84 38 17 12 9 56 39 +17 44.74
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Christian Coste 1985 15 6 6 3 19 21 -2 40.00
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Gérard Houllier 1985–87,
1988
123 55 34 34 150 117 +33 44.72
1986
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Erick Mombaerts 1987–88 8 1 3 4 6 12 -6 12.50
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Tomislav Ivić 1988–90 86 41 21 24 111 88 +23 47.67
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Henri Michel 1990–91 41 15 12 14 42 44 -2 36.59
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Portugal Artur Jorge July 1991–June 94,
Oct 1998–March 99
167 84 54 29 235 118 +117 50.30
1994
-
1993
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Luis Fernández July 1994–June 96,
Dec 2000–June 03
244 125 61 58 360 206 +154 51.23
-
-
1995
1995
1995
-
1996
-
2001
-
-
[B][D]
Brazil Ricardo Gomes July 1996–June 98 106 54 24 28 167 106 +61 50.94
-
-
1998
1998
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
France Alain Giresse July 1998–Oct 98 11 4 2 5 10 11 -1 36.36
-
-
-
-
1998
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Philippe Bergeroo March 1999–Dec 00 75 35 16 24 116 101 +15 46.67
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Bosnia and Herzegovina Vahid Halilhodžić July 2003–Feb 05 80 36 27 17 100 75 +25 45.00
-
-
2004
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
France Laurent Fournier Feb 2005–Dec 05 36 17 7 12 47 38 +9 47.22
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
France Guy Lacombe Dec 2005–Jan 07 55 18 21 16 70 57 +13 32.73
-
-
2006
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Paul Le Guen Jan 2007–June 09 132 62 30 40 167 127 +40 46.97
-
-
-
2008
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
France Antoine Kombouaré July 2009–Dec 11 134 61 39 34 205 138 +67 45.52
-
-
2010
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
[B]
Italy Carlo Ancelotti Dec 2011–July 13 77 49 19 9 153 64 +89 63.64 2013
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Laurent Blanc July 2013–Present 55 40 9 6 126 41 +85 72.73 2014
-
-
2014 2013
-
-
-
-
-
-

Notes[edit]

A. ^ Win% is rounded to two decimal places.

B. a b c d e f g h Formerly played for the club.

C. ^ First manager of the club.

D. ^ First and only French manager to win a major European trophy with a French club (1995–96 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Entraineurs". PSG.fr. Retrieved 16 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "Les entraîneurs du PSG de 1970 à 1979". PSG.fr. Retrieved 12 October 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Les entraîneurs du PSG de 1979 à 1991". PSG.fr. Retrieved 12 October 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c "Les entraîneurs du PSG de 1991 à Aujourd'hui". PSG.fr. Retrieved 12 October 2010. 
  5. ^ "Le Guen returns to coach at PSG". BBC Sport. 15 January 2007. Retrieved 15 January 2007. 
  6. ^ "Coach Le Guen to leave PSG at end of season". Reuters. 5 May 2009. Retrieved 19 October 2009. 
  7. ^ "Former player Kombouaré to coach Paris Saint Germain". France 24. 28 May 2009. Retrieved 19 October 2009. 
  8. ^ "Tous les Entraineurs et Presidents du PSG". PSG70. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 

External links[edit]

Official Websites
News Sites
Preceded by
Real Zaragoza
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Winner
1996
Runner up: Rapid Vienna
Succeeded by
Barcelona