List of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. presidents

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This chronological list comprises all those who have held the position of Paris Saint-Germain president from 1970, when the first president was appointed, to the present day. Each president's entry includes his dates of tenure and honours won while under his care. PSG have had 17 presidents since the appointment of Pierre-Étienne Guyot in 1970. The most successful president of PSG is Michel Denisot (1991 – 1998) with eight major trophies won: one League title, three French Cups, two League Cups, one Champions Trophy and one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup. The longest-running president is Francis Borelli with 13 years in charge (1978 – 1991). Nasser Al-Khelaïfi is the current president of Paris Saint-Germain. Association PSG, meanwhile, has known three chairmen since 1991. The most successful chairman of Paris Saint-Germain is Bernard Brochand (1991 – 2001) with nine major trophies won: one League title, three French Cups, two League Cups, two Champions Trophies and one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup. He is also the club's longest-serving chairman in terms of time, with 10 years in charge. Simon Tahar has been chairman of Association PSG since 2006.[1]

History[edit]

Stade Saint-Germain president Henri Patrelle negotiated the union with Paris FC which led to the creation of Paris Saint-Germain Football Club in 1970. Pierre-Étienne Guyot was named president, while Henri Patrelle and Guy Crescent were respectively appointed sporting vice-president and administrative vice-president in June 1970. Guy Crescent was named president and Henri Patrelle became sole vice-president in June 1971. New changes to the club's head saw the return of Patrelle as president in December 1971. PSG president Henri Patrelle, searching for financial support, made way for fashion designer Daniel Hechter, who allowed the club to obtain professional status in 1973.[2] Daniel Hechter was banned from football for life by the FFF following the scandal of double ticketing at the Parc des Princes in 1978. Francis Borelli replaced him as PSG president.[3] The smiling president Borelli remained in charge for 13 seasons. He passed the baton to Canal + in May 1991. The encrypted channel ensured Paris Saint-Germain's management through delegated-presidents: Michel Denisot, Charles Biétry, Laurent Perpère, Francis Graille and Pierre Blayau.[4][5][6]

Paris Saint-Germain was bought by a consortium comprising Colony Capital, Butler Capital Partners and Morgan Stanley in April 2006.[7] Alain Cayzac was named president in June 2006. The next two seasons were complicated for the club, including the case Paris Saint-Germain – Hapoel Tel Aviv and disappointing results in the league. Alain Cayzac resigned in April 2008, with four games remaining and Paris Saint-Germain in relegation zone.[8] He was temporarily replaced by Simon Tahar, who was then succeeded by Charles Villeneuve in May 2008, days after Paris Saint-Germain maintained Ligue 1 status and lost the French Cup Final to Olympique Lyonnais.[9] Following a dispute over the management of the club, Charles Villeneuve resigned from his mandate as president in February 2009.[10] Philippe Boindrieux was temporary named CEO while a new president was appointed.[11] Sébastien Bazin became the new president of Paris Saint-Germain.[12] Colony Capital acquired all the shares of Morgan Stanley, becoming owners of 95% of the club in June 2009.[13] Sébastien Bazin announced that Robin Leproux joined the club's board of directors in July 2009.[14]

Robin Leproux was named president in September 2009.[15] He revived the Tournoi de Paris in July 2010 for the club's 40th Anniversary.[16][17] Laurent Perpère and Francis Graille, two former presidents of Paris Saint-Germain, were handed suspended jail sentences and fines over a series of suspect transfers between 1998 and 2003. Perpère was given an 18-month suspended sentence and a 40,000-euros fine, while Graille received a one-year suspended sentence and a €20,000 fine. They set up the illegal scheme which included players, agents and Nike France. Nike France and PSG were respectively fined €120,000 and €150,000 for their part in the operation.[18] Sébastien Bazin extended the tenure of Robin Leproux until 2013.[19] After a season marked by the violence, Robin Leproux announced the main measures of "Tous PSG" in May 2010, an anti-violence plan to pacify the Parc des Princes: removal of subscriptions, random distribution of seats and fully supervision over the fans.[20] It was a powerful measure by the club which intended to finally turn a page in their history, often punctuated by serious incidents due to the increasing antagonism between supporters of Auteuil and Boulogne. Since the deadly assault against Yann L. during the PSG-OM in February 2010, Robin Leproux and the club wanted to revolutionize the Parc des Princes.[21]

Qatar Investment Authority became the majority shareholder of Paris Saint-Germain after buying a controlling 70% of the shares in May 2011.[22] Colony Capital (29%) and Butler Capital Partners (1%) remained minority shareholders.[23] "Tous PSG", the club's anti-violence plan, was renewed in June 2011. Robin Leproux participated, along with government and LFP officials.[24] Robin Leproux - whose duties were seen to be incompatible with the powerful position created for newly appointed PSG director of football Leonardo - was replaced by interim president Benoît Rousseau in July 2011.[25] The latter then abandoned his temporary functions to make way for new president Nasser Al-Khelaïfi in October 2011. Jean-Claude Blanc, meanwhile, was appointed Delegate Director General.[26] He became the first non-French president of Paris Saint-Germain.[27] Al-Khelaïfi was named "Sports Innovator of the Year" for 2011 by SportBusiness International magazine in December 2011.[28] QIA became the sole shareholder of the capital club after purchasing the remaining 30% stake held by Colony Capital and Butler Capital Partners in March 2012.[29] The transaction valued the entire club at €100m. Nasser Al-Khelaïfi announced that he expected to invest €100m on the transfer market in the years to come to build a strong team.[30]

List of Presidents[edit]

Since its foundation, Paris Saint-Germain has had 17 presidents.[1]

As of 7 October 2011.
Name Period Trophies Total
Domestic International
L1 L2 CF CL TC UCL CWC UEL UIC USC FCWC
France Pierre-Étienne Guyot 1970 – 1971
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Guy Crescent 1971
-
1971
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Henri Patrelle 1971 – 1974
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Daniel Hechter 1974 – 1978
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Francis Borelli 1978 – 1991
1986
-
1982, 1983
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
France Michel Denisot 1991 – 1998
1994
-
1993, 1995, 1998
1995, 1998
1995
-
1996
-
-
-
-
8
France Charles Biétry 1998
-
-
-
-
1998
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Laurent Perpère 1998 – 2003
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2001
-
-
1
France Francis Graille 2003 – 2005
-
-
2004
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Pierre Blayau 2005 – 2006
-
-
2006
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Alain Cayzac 2006 – 2008
-
-
-
2008
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Simon Tahar 2008
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Charles Villeneuve 2008 – 2009
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Sébastien Bazin 2009
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
France Robin Leproux 2009 – 2011
-
-
2010
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
France Benoît Rousseau 2011
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Qatar Nasser Al-Khelaïfi 2011 – 2013
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
Total 1970 – 2011 3 1 8 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 18

In addition, Association PSG has known three chairmen since 1991.[1]

As of 21 July 2010.
Name Period Trophies Total
Domestic International
L1 L2 CF CL TC UCL CWC UEL UIC USC FCWC
France Bernard Brochand 1991 – 2001
1994
-
1993, 1995, 1998
1995, 1998
1995, 1998
-
1996
-
-
-
-
9
France Alain Cayzac 2001 – 2006
-
-
2004, 2006
-
-
-
-
-
2001
-
-
3
France Simon Tahar 2006 – 2013
-
2010
2008
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
Total 1991 – 2011 2 0 6 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Presidents". PSG.fr. Retrieved 16 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "L'historique du club des saisons 1970/1978". PSG.fr. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "Parcours de Francis Borelli (1/5)". PSG MAG. 10 September 2008. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "L'historique du club des saisons de 1990/2000". PSG.fr. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  5. ^ "L'historique du club de la saison 2003/2004". PSG.fr. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  6. ^ "L'historique du club de la saison 2005/2006". PSG.fr. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  7. ^ "Paris Saint-Germain changes hands". BBC. 11 April 2006. Retrieved 11 April 2006. 
  8. ^ "Cayzac démissionne". L'Equipe. 21 April 2008. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  9. ^ "Charles Villeneuve nommé Président". PSG.fr. 27 May 2008. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  10. ^ "Official Club Statement". PSG.fr. 1 January 2009. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  11. ^ Le Parisien, N°20035 su 4 février 2009, p.16
  12. ^ "Sébastien new PSG club president". France 24. 4 February 2009. Retrieved 3 August 2010. 
  13. ^ "Colony Capital buy out Morgan Stanley". PSG.fr. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 3 October 2009. 
  14. ^ "Leproux joins Paris Saint-Germain". PSG.fr. 28 July 2009. Retrieved 19 October 2009. 
  15. ^ "Leproux named PSG president". PSG.fr. 9 September 2009. Retrieved 9 November 2009. 
  16. ^ "Le Paris SG va relancer le Tournoi de Paris en juillet". Le Point. 24 December 2009. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  17. ^ "Tournoi de Paris le 31 juillet". Sport24. 3 May 2010. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  18. ^ "Suspended jail terms requested for former PSG presidents". France 24. 12 April 2010. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  19. ^ "Leproux prolongé". Goal.com. 14 May 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  20. ^ "Leproux dit stop à la violence au Parc". Goal.com. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  21. ^ "Leproux supprime les abonnements". Goal.com. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  22. ^ "Qatari group takes control of PSG". ESPNsoccernet. 31 May 2011. Retrieved 1 June 2011. 
  23. ^ "PSG: 'We want the new Messi'". Ligue 1. 1 July 2011. Retrieved 1 July 2011. 
  24. ^ "Le nouveau plan sécurité validé par le ministère". Le Parisien. 19 June 2011. Retrieved 20 June 2011. 
  25. ^ "PSG's Leonardo revolution begins". Ligue 1. 13 July 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
  26. ^ "Jean-Claude Blanc Directeur Général Délégué". PSG.fr. 7 October 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2011. 
  27. ^ "PSG, la otra revolución francesa". Mediapunta. 10 February 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  28. ^ "Al-Khelaïfi crowned Sports Innovator of the year". SportBusiness. 2 December 2011. Retrieved 13 January 2012. 
  29. ^ "Le Qatar sans limite". Le Parisien. 7 March 2012. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 
  30. ^ "Qatari investors take full control of PSG". Emirates 24/7. 7 March 2012. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 

External links[edit]

Official Websites
News Sites
Preceded by
Real Zaragoza
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Winner
1996
Runner-up: Rapid Vienna
Succeeded by
Barcelona