List of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. seasons

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PSG's star signing Zlatan Ibrahimović for the 2012–13 season kicked off the club's rise to the summit of Ligue 1 supported by their ambitious "Dream Bigger" project.

Paris Saint-Germain F.C. is a professional football club based in Paris, France. The capital club was founded on 12 August 1970 following the merger of Paris FC and Stade Saint-Germain.[1]

Les Rouge-et-Bleu have won the Ligue 1 title four times, the Ligue 2 once, the Coupe de France eight times, the Coupe de la Ligue four times, the Trophée des Champions three times, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup once and the UEFA Intertoto Cup once.[2]

Having won 22 titles, PSG is the third most successful club in France and one of only two French clubs (with Olympique de Marseille) to win a major European club competition.[3]

The list covers the period from 1970 (when the club was founded) to the present day. It details the club's achievements in senior league and cup competitions, the top scorers and the average attendance for each season.

Key[edit]

Key to competitions

Seasons[edit]

As of 18 July 2014.[2]
Season League CF CL TC Europe Av. Attendance Top Goalscorer(s) [n 1]
Division P Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Name Goals
1970-71 D2 1st 30 17 11 2 52 23 +29 45 R64 3,019 France Jacques Rémond 11
1971-72 D1 16th [n 2] 38 10 10 18 51 67 -16 30 R64 [n 3] 10,030 France Jean-Claude Bras 12
1972-73 D3 2nd [n 4] 30 17 8 5 67 28 +39 42 R64 675 France Christian André 26
1973–74 D2 2nd 34 19 6 9 70 42 +28 57 QF 4,087 France Jean-Pierre Dogliani 16
1974–75 D1 15th 38 12 12 14 57 65 -8 37 SF 17,167 Republic of the Congo François M'Pelé 31
1975–76 D1 14th 38 13 11 14 63 60 +3 39 QF 17,269 Republic of the Congo François M'Pelé 18
1976–77 D1 9th 38 17 8 13 65 55 +10 42 R16 22,410 Algeria Mustapha Dahleb 26
1977–78 D1 11th 38 14 8 16 75 66 +9 36 R32 21,754 Argentina Carlos Bianchi 39
1978–79 D1 13th 38 14 8 16 59 66 -7 36 R32 18,590 Argentina Carlos Bianchi 32
1979–80 D1 7th 38 15 10 13 59 52 +7 40 R32 21,361 France Jean-François Beltramini 14
1980–81 D1 5th 38 17 12 9 62 50 +12 46 R32 23,329 France Dominique Rocheteau 18
1981–82 D1 7th 38 17 9 12 58 45 +13 43 W 24,082 France Dominique Rocheteau 16
1982–83 D1 3rd 38 20 7 11 66 49 +17 47 W European Cup Winners' Cup QF 23,928 Netherlands Kees Kist 17
1983–84 D1 4th 38 18 11 9 56 37 +19 47 R64 European Cup Winners' Cup R2 23,840 Senegal Michel N'Gom 11
1984–85 D1 13th 38 13 7 18 58 73 -15 33 RU UEFA Cup R2 16,255 France Dominique Rocheteau 21
1985–86 D1 1st 38 23 9 6 66 33 +33 55 SF 24,572 France Dominique Rocheteau 20
1986–87 D1 7th 38 14 13 11 35 33 +2 41 R32 RU European Cup R1 19,775 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Vahid Halilhodžić 9
1987–88 D1 15th 38 12 10 16 36 45 -9 34 R32 19,775 Senegal Oumar Sène 6
1988–89 D1 2nd 38 19 13 6 45 26 +19 70 R16 17,319 France Daniel Xuereb 17
1989–90 D1 5th 38 18 9 14 50 48 +2 42 R64 UEFA Cup R2 16,923 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zlatko Vujović 11
1990–91 D1 9th 38 13 12 13 40 42 -2 38 R16 14,454 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Safet Sušić
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zlatko Vujović
11
1991–92 D1 3rd 38 15 17 8 43 27 +16 47 R32 26,606 France Christian Perez 13
1992–93 D1 2nd [n 5] 38 20 11 7 61 29 +32 51 W UEFA Cup [n 6] SF 26,704 Liberia George Weah 24
1993–94 D1 1st 38 24 11 3 54 22 +32 59 QF European Cup Winners' Cup SF 28,370 France David Ginola 20
1994–95 [n 7] D1 3rd 38 20 7 11 58 41 +17 67 W W [n 8] UEFA Champions League [n 9] SF 34,700 Liberia George Weah [n 10] 18
1995–96 D1 2nd 38 19 11 8 65 36 +29 68 R16 R32 W [n 11] UEFA Cup Winners' Cup [n 12] W 37,353 France Youri Djorkaeff 20
UEFA Super Cup [n 13] RU
1996–97 D1 2nd 38 18 13 7 57 31 +26 67 R16 R32 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup RU 35,582 France Patrice Loko 20
1997–98 D1 8th 34 14 8 12 43 35 +8 50 W W UEFA Champions League GS 36,713 Italy Marco Simone 22
1998–99 D1 9th 34 10 9 15 34 35 -1 39 R32 QF W UEFA Cup Winners' Cup R1 41,125 Italy Marco Simone 10
1999–2000 D1 2nd 34 16 10 8 54 40 +14 58 R16 RU 43,185 Brazil Christian 19
2000–01 D1 9th 34 12 8 14 44 45 -1 44 R32 R32 UEFA Champions League 2GS 42,759 France Laurent Robert 18
2001–02 D1 4th 34 15 13 6 43 24 +19 58 QF SF UEFA Intertoto Cup [n 14] W 41,040 Brazil Ronaldinho 13
UEFA Cup R3
2002–03 L1 [n 15] 11th 38 14 12 12 47 36 +11 54 RU R32 UEFA Cup R3 38,481 Brazil Ronaldinho 12
2003–04 L1 2nd 38 22 10 6 50 28 +22 76 W R32 38,810 Portugal Pauleta 23
2004–05 L1 9th 38 12 15 11 40 41 -1 51 R16 R16 RU UEFA Champions League GS 37,367 Portugal Pauleta 19
2005–06 L1 9th 38 13 13 12 44 38 +6 52 W R16 40,486 Portugal Pauleta 29
2006–07 L1 15th 38 12 12 14 42 42 0 48 QF R16 RU UEFA Cup R16 36,271 Portugal Pauleta 24
2007–08 L1 16th 38 10 13 15 37 45 -8 43 RU W 36,946 Portugal Pauleta
Ivory Coast Amara Diané
15
2008–09 L1 6th 38 19 7 12 49 38 +11 64 R16 SF UEFA Cup [n 16] QF 40,902 France Guillaume Hoarau 20
2009–10 L1 13th 38 12 11 15 50 46 +4 47 W R16 [n 17] 33,266 Turkey Mevlüt Erdinç 19
2010–11 L1 4th 38 15 15 8 56 41 +15 60 RU SF RU UEFA Europa League R16 29,310 Brazil Nenê
France Guillaume Hoarau
20
2011–12 L1 2nd 38 23 10 5 75 41 +34 79 QF R16 UEFA Europa League GS 42,882 Brazil Nenê 27
2012–13 L1 1st 38 25 8 5 69 23 +46 83 QF QF UEFA Champions League QF 43,235 Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimovic 35
2013–14 L1 1st 38 27 8 3 84 23 +61 89 R16 W W UEFA Champions League QF 45,420 Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimovic 41
2014–15 L1 / 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 R32 R8 W UEFA Champions League GS Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimovic 5

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Includes all goals scored in League, Coupe de France, Coupe de la Ligue, Trophée des Champions, UEFA Champions League, UEFA Europa League, UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, UEFA Super Cup, Intercontinental Cup and FIFA Club World Championship matches.
  2. ^ Paris Saint-Germain maintained the category after finishing 16th in the league. However, the season was marked by the split between the Parisians and the Sangermanois in May 1972. Paris FC merged with CA Montreuil and remained in the first division, while PSG assumed amateur status and continued life in the third division.
  3. ^ The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was replaced by the UEFA Cup.
  4. ^ Paris Saint-Germain finished in second place, missing out on promotion by little. However, the first, Quevilly, officially dissolved due to financial problems at the end of the season and consequently the club was disqualified. PSG, second in the table, took their place in the second division.
  5. ^ Paris Saint-Germain ended vice-champion in the league while Olympique de Marseille was forced to relinquish the title due to the VA-OM corruption case. Canal+ didn't let PSG accept the title fearing the anger of their provincial subscribers.
  6. ^ The European Cup was renamed the UEFA Champions League.
  7. ^ The 1994–95 season saw the introduction of three points for a win.
  8. ^ First winner of the Coupe de la Ligue.
  9. ^ The European Cup Winners' Cup was renamed the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup. The International Football Cup was renamed the UEFA Intertoto Cup.
  10. ^ George Weah won both the Ballon d'Or and the FIFA World Player of the Year in 1995.
  11. ^ The Challenge des Champions was renamed the Trophée des Champions.
  12. ^ PSG won the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and became the second and last French club to win an European Cup.
  13. ^ The UEFA Super Cup was played over two legs in 1997.
  14. ^ PSG won the UEFA Intertoto Cup and entered the first round of the UEFA Cup for that season.
  15. ^ The Division 1 was renamed the Ligue 1 and PSG was one of the founding members.
  16. ^ The UEFA Intertoto Cup was discontinued after the 2008 edition.
  17. ^ The UEFA Cup was renamed the UEFA Europa League.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Club history: 1970-78". PSG.fr. 19 May 2013. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "PARIS SAINT-GERMAIN". LFP. Retrieved 29 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "TdC: A look at champions Paris SG". Ligue 1. 30 July 2013. Retrieved 30 July 2013. 

External links[edit]

Official Websites
News Sites