List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom by nickname

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This is a list of nicknames of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom. Since Sir Robert Walpole, most Prime Ministers have had a nickname which was in common usage at the time they were in office. Many nicknames can be perceived as disparaging although others are complimentary or affectionate.

Tony Blair's Special Relationship with the President of the United States, George W. Bush, gained him the nickname "America's Poodle".
Prime Minister Nicknames
David Cameron

"Dave"[1]
"Dave the Chameleon"[2]
"Flashman"[3][4]

Gordon Brown

"Flash Gordon"[5]
"The Big Clunking Fist"[6][7]
"Bottler Brown"[8]
"Golden Brown"[9]
"Gordo"[10]
"Great Leader"/"Stalin"[11][12][13]
"Squatter at No. 10" [14][15][16]

Tony Blair

"Bambi"[17]
"Bliar"[17]
"America's Poodle"[18]
"Teflon Tony"[19]

John Major "Grey Man"[20]
Margaret Thatcher

"Attila the Hen"[21]
"The Great She-Elephant"[22][23]
"The Grocer's Daughter"[24]
"The Iron Lady"[25]
"Maggie"[26]
"Milk Snatcher"[27]

James Callaghan

"Big Jim"[28]
"Sunny Jim"[28]

Edward Heath

"Grocer Heath"[29]

Harold Wilson

"Wislon"[30]

Alec Douglas-Home "Baillie Vass"[31][32]
Harold Macmillan "Supermac"[33]
"Mac the Knife"[33]
Anthony Eden
Clement Attlee "Clem"[34]
Winston Churchill "Winnie"[35]
"(British) Bulldog"[36]
Neville Chamberlain "The Coroner"[37]
Ramsay MacDonald "Ramsay Mac"[38]
"Ramshackle Mac"[39]
Stanley Baldwin "The Ironmonger"
"Honest Stan"
Andrew Bonar Law "The Unknown Prime Minister"[40]
David Lloyd George "The Welsh Wizard"[41]
"The Man Who Won The War"[41]
"The Welsh Goat"[42]
Herbert Henry Asquith "The Last of the Romans"[43]
"The Sledgehammer"[44]
"Squiffy"[45]
Henry Campbell-Bannerman "CB"[46]
Arthur James Balfour "Pretty Fanny"[47]
"Bloody Balfour"[48]
Earl of Rosebery "Puddin'"
Marquess of Salisbury
William Ewart Gladstone "Grand Old Man"[49]
"The People's William"[49]
Murderer of Gordon
Benjamin Disraeli "Dizzy"[50]
Viscount Palmerston "Lord Cupid"[51]
"Lord Pumicestone"[51]
Earl of Aberdeen
Earl of Derby "Scorpion Stanley"[52]
"The Rupert of Debate"[52]
Earl Russell "Finality Jack"[53]
"The Widow's Mite"[53]
Robert Peel "Orange Peel"[54]
Viscount Melbourne
Earl Grey
Duke of Wellington "The Iron Duke"[55]
"Europe's Liberator"[55]
"Saviour of the Nations"[55]
Viscount Goderich "Prosperity Robinson"[56]
"Goody Goderich"[56]
"The Blubberer"[56]
George Canning "The Cicero of the British Senate"[57]
"The Zany of Debate"[57]
Earl of Liverpool
Spencer Perceval "Little P"[58]
William Grenville "Bogey"[59]
Henry Addington "The Doctor"[60]
William Pitt "Pitt the Younger"[61]
Duke of Portland
Earl of Shelburne "Malagrida"[62]
"The Jesuit in Berkerly Square"[62]
Lord North "Boreas" (the north wind)[63]
"Lord-deputy North"[63]
Duke of Grafton "Royal Oak"[64]
"The Turf Macaroni"[64]
Earl of Chatham "The Great Commoner"[65]
Marquess of Rockingham
George Grenville "Gentle Shepherd"[66]
Earl of Bute "Jack Boot"[67]
Duke of Devonshire
Duke of Newcastle "Hubble-Bubble"[68]
Henry Pelham "King Henry the Ninth"[69]
Earl of Wilmington
Robert Walpole "Sir Bluestring"[70]
"Screen-Master General"[70]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cameron is reported to be known to friends and family as 'Dave' rather than David, although he invariably uses 'David' in public. Rumbelow, Helen (21 May 2005)."The gilded youth whose son steeled him in adversity". The Times (London). Retrieved 4 September 2007.
  2. ^ Dave the Chameleon was the British Labour Party's advertising slogan, and the basis of its political campaign, for the 2006 elections to local government.
  3. ^ Letts, Quentin (12 May 2011). "'Flashman' just makes Cameron sound more sexy and swaggery". Daily Mail (London). 
  4. ^ "Cameron like bully Flashman, says Miliband". BBC News. 11 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "PM downplays 'saving world' gaffe". BBC News. 10 December 2008. Retrieved 1 November 2012. "Some detractors have jokingly compared him to the fantasy film hero - and partial namesake - Flash Gordon, who rescued earth from attack by Martians." 
  6. ^ First used by Tony Blair during his final Queen's Speech debate; later used by columnists throughout the British media. Kettle, Martin (18 March 2009). "'Clunking fist' - down but not out". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 1 April 2009. 
  7. ^ Ashley, Jackie (8 January 2007). "Control freaks beware, the big clunking fist is after you". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 1 November 2012. 
  8. ^ Used in relation to Brown not calling an election in 2007 after previously suggesting he would. Rawnsley, Andrew (7 November 2007). "They will call him Bottler Brown and it is going to hurt". The Observer (London). Retrieved 31 July 2008. "The Tories will try to stick him with the nickname 'Bottler Brown'. That's a soubriquet he is going to hate, not least because it is a label with history." 
  9. ^ "Golden Brown". The Guardian (London). 11 March 1999. Retrieved 31 July 2008.  Used by Terry Wogan and the TOGs, normally followed by Wogan saying "Never a frown with Golden Brown", a reference to the song "Golden Brown" by The Stranglers.
  10. ^ Parris, Matthew (30 May 2009). "Let's go. We can't. We're waiting for Gordo". The Times (London). Retrieved 23 November 2009.  (subscription required)
  11. ^ Gimson, Andrew (29 November 2007). "Gordon Brown: From Stalin to Mr Bean". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 3 September 2010. 
  12. ^ Often sarcastically used by Andrew Neil on This Week in relation to Lord Turnbull's description of Brown as a man who operates with "Stalinist ruthlessness"
  13. ^ "Brown accused of 'ruthlessness'". BBC News. 20 March 2007. Retrieved 31 July 2008. "The chancellor has a Macavity quality. He is not there when there is dirty work to be done.... You can choose whether you are impressed or depressed by that, but you cannot help admire the sheer Stalinist ruthlessness of it all." 
  14. ^ Boden, Nicola (10 May 2010). "From green-eyed Chancellor to the 'squatter of No10, Gordon Brown finally admits he can't hang on to job he coveted for so long". Daily Mail (London). Retrieved 3 September 2010. 
  15. ^ Rentoul, John (14 December 2010). "Gordon the Squatter". The Independent. Retrieved 1 November 2012. 
  16. ^ Newton Dunn, Tom (8 May 2010). "Gordon Brown squatting in No 10". The Sun (London). Retrieved 3 September 2010.  (subscription required)
  17. ^ a b "A decade of Tony Blair: From Bambi to Bliar". The Economist (London). 2 May 2007. Retrieved 31 July 2008. "Mr Blair walked into Downing Street as the youngest prime minister since 1812. His political nickname, at the time, was "Bambi".... The suspicion that Mr Blair misled voters over Iraq has become an accusation of bad faith that has been impossible to shake off. By now a common nickname for the prime minister was "Bliar"." 
  18. ^ Rob Watson (31 January 2003). "Tony Blair: The US poodle?". BBC News. Retrieved 31 July 2008. ""America's Poodle" is the insult of choice hurled by critics of Tony Blair for his support for President Bush." 
  19. ^ Riddell, Peter (10 November 2005). "The collapse of Teflon Tony.". The Times (London). Retrieved 25 July 2008. "TONY BLAIR no longer commands. Teflon Tony is dead."  (subscription required)
  20. ^ "John Major - The grey man of British politics?". Oxford University Press. OALD Online. Retrieved 31 July 2008. "Major had been considered a decent but uninspiring person who was known as the "grey man" of politics." 
  21. ^ Rifkind, Malcolm (8 May 2000). "Attila the Hen". New Statesman (London). Retrieved 29 July 2008. "Denis Healey, with characteristic charm, once referred to her as "Attila the Hen"." 
  22. ^ Rentoul, John (13 May 2007). "Blair the betrayed: Labour will be oh-so-sorry when he's gone". The Independent (London). Retrieved 31 July 2008. "And it is why he will tender his resignation from the office of Prime Minister on 27 June this year rather than at the end of next year, which would have given him a longer stretch at the top than the Great She-Elephant herself." 
  23. ^ Rawnsley, Andrew (1 July 2007). "The new Prime Minister is master of his universe". The Observer (London). Retrieved 31 July 2008. "A Spitting Image sketch had a waiter asking her what she wanted for dinner. 'Steak,' replied the Great She Elephant. 'And what about the vegetables?' Withering the cabinet, she delivered the punchline: 'They'll have the same.'" 
  24. ^ Beckman, Jonathan (30 December 2007). "Margaret Thatcher, Volume One: The Grocer's Daughter by John Campbell". The Observer. 
  25. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Margaret Thatcher". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  26. ^ Walker, Tim (21 July 2008). "Maggie Thatcher speaks out in defence of Gordon Brown". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 29 July 2008. 
  27. ^ "The truth about Thatcher Thatcher milk snatcher". BBC News. 1 January 2001. Retrieved 31 July 2008. "Years before she entered Number 10 as prime minister was the one that left her dubbed "Thatcher, Thatcher Milk Snatcher"." 
  28. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: James Callaghan". number-10.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 16 December 2011. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  29. ^ MacShane, Denis (25 July 2005). "Held in misguided contempt". New Statesman (London). Retrieved 29 July 2008. "I had grown up with the Grocer Heath image from Private Eye, and marched against his industrial relations reforms in the 1970s - although his proposals would have left unions legally stronger than they are today under the EU Social Charter." 
  30. ^ Popularised by Private Eye.
  31. ^ Patrick Marnham, "The Private Eye Story", Fontana/Collins, 1983, p. 74.
  32. ^ "Exclusive Private Eye audio recordings: a 50-year comedy tradition". The Guardian (London). 5 November 2011. "Arising from a mistaken photo caption in a Scottish newspaper, the Eye decided to dub PM Sir Alex Douglas-Home as Baillie Vass." 
  33. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Harold Macmillan". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  34. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Clement Attlee". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  35. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Sir Winston Churchill". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  36. ^ Moynahan, Brian (30 October 2005). "Guarding the bulldog". The Times (London). Retrieved 29 July 2008. 
  37. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Neville Chamberlain". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  38. ^ "Appearance of Evil". Time (New York). 22 September 1924. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  39. ^ AJP Taylor, English History 1914-1945.
  40. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Andrew Bonar Law". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  41. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: David Lloyd George". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  42. ^ Howard, Anthony (30 April 2006). "The first rule of the politician's wife should be: Never leave your husband on his own". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 31 July 2008. "And the best case ever to be made for that most notorious philanderer of them all, David Lloyd George (not for nothing known as "the Welsh Goat") has always seemed to me to lie in the fact that his wife, Margaret, was asking for trouble when, from the moment of his election for Caernarvon Boroughs in 1890, she insisted on staying in north Wales and not accompanying her husband to London." 
  43. ^ "Last of the Romans?". The Spectator (London). 6 November 1964. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  44. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Herbert Henry Asquith". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  45. ^ "The politics of drinking in power". BBC News. 9 July 2008. Retrieved 6 January 2006. "Prime Minister Herbert "squiffy" Asquith used to sway on his feet when speaking or answering questions in the House of Commons." 
  46. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Henry Campbell-Bannerman". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  47. ^ Pearce, Malcolm; Stewart, Geoffrey (1992). British Political History, 1867-1990: Democracy and Decline. Routledge. Retrieved 31 July 2008. "His delicacy of appearance and manners earned him the nickname 'pretty Fanny'." 
  48. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Arthur James Balfour". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  49. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: William Ewart Gladstone". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  50. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Benjamin Disraeli". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  51. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Viscount Palmerston". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  52. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Earl of Derby". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  53. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Earl Russell". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  54. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Sir Robert Peel". number-10.gov.uk. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  55. ^ a b c "Prime Ministers in History: Duke of Wellington". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  56. ^ a b c "Prime Ministers in History: Viscount Goderich". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  57. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: George Canning". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  58. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Spencer Perceval". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  59. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Lord Grenville". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  60. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Henry Addington". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. }}
  61. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: William Pitt". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  62. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Earl of Shelburne". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. }}
  63. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History Lord North". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  64. ^ a b "Prime Ministers in History: Duke of Grafton". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  65. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Earl of Chatham". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  66. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: George Grenville". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  67. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Earl of Bute". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  68. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Duke of Newcastle". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  69. ^ "Prime Ministers in History: Henry Pelham". Prime Minister's Office. Retrieved 31 July 2008. 
  70. ^ a b Englefield, Dermot; Seaton, Janet; White, Isobel. Facts about the British Prime Ministers. Mansell, 1995, p. 2.