List of Royal Air Force groups

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This is a list of Royal Air Force groups. The group is a formation just below command level.

There are currently only five groups in operation: No. 1 Group, No. 2 Group, No. 22 Group, No. 38 Group and No. 83 Group.

Group Dates active Notes
No. 1 Group RAF 1918–1926
1927–1939
1940–present
Originally formed on 1 April 1918, it was renumbered No. 21 Group on 12 April 1926. Reformed on 25 August 1927 by renaming the Air Defence Group, but disbanded on 22 December 1939. Reformed on 22 June 1940 in Bomber Command, post-war it operated the Thor ballistic missile. From 1968 it operated bomber and strike aircraft of Strike Command. Since January 2000 it has been responsible for UK air defence operations.[1]
No. 2 Group RAF 1918-1920
1936–1947
1948–1958
1993–1996
2000–present
Formed as No. 2 (Training) Group on 1 April 1918, it was disbanded on 31 March 1920. Reformed as No. 2 (Bombing) Group, Bomber Command on 20 March 1936. In May 1943 it was transferred to the 2nd Tactical Air Force, Fighter Command, until the formation of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force. Disbanded on 1 May 1947, but reformed on 1 December 1948 as part of the British Air Force of Occupation. It rejoined 2nd TAF on 1 September 1951, and was disbanded on 15 November 1958. Reformed on 1 April 1993 by renaming RAF Germany, then disbanded on 1 April 1996 when absorbed into No. 1 Group. Reformed on 7 January 2000 to control air transport, air-to-air refuelling and airborne early warning within the RAF. On 1 April 2006 it absorbed No. 3 Group.[1]
No. 3 Group RAF 1918-1921
1923-1926
1936-1967
2000-2006
No. 3 Group was first formed on 10 May 1918, and disbanded on 31 August 1921. It was reformed from No. 11 Wing on 1 April 1923 and disbanded when renumbered as No. 23 (Training) Group on 12 April 1926. Reformed on 1 May 1936 as No. 3 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command. From 1959 to 1963 it operated the Thor ballistic missile, then V bomber squadrons until disbanded in 1967. It was reformed on 1 April 2000 to control the Joint Force Harrier and Maritime resources. By 2004 it was also responsible for Air Battle Management, but was disbanded on 1 April 2006, and its functions taken over by No 2 Group.[1]
No. 4 Group RAF 1918–1919
1937–1948
Originally formed on 1 April 1918, but disbanded on 24 March 1919. It was reformed on 1 April 1937 as No. 4 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command. Transferred to Transport Command on 7 May 1945, and disbanded on 2 February 1948.[1]
No. 5 Group RAF 1918–1919
1937–1945
Formed on 1 April 1918, but disbanded on 15 May 1919. Reformed on 1 September 1937 as No. 5 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command. Disbanded on 15 December 1945.[1]
No. 6 Group RAF 1918
1924-1926
1936-1939
1942-1945
No. 6 (Equipment) Group was formed on 1 April 1918, but was renamed Technical Group on 15 August 1918. It was reformed in Italy as No. 6 (Adriatic) Group on 27 September 1918, but reduced to No. 66 Wing on 20 December 1918. Reformed as No. 6 (Fighter) Group on 1 May 1924, and disbanded 20 May 1926. Reformed as No. 6 (Auxiliary) Group on 1 May 1936 by renaming No. 1 (Air Defence Group). Transferred to Bomber Command on 14 July 1936, and renamed No. 6 (Bomber) Group on 1 January 1939, but became No. 91 Group on 11 May 1942. Reformed as part of the Royal Canadian Air Force on 25 October 1942, and disbanded on 31 August 1945.[1]
No. 7 Group RAF 1918–1919
1919–1926
1940–1942
1944–1945
Formed on 1 April 1918 from Southern Training Brigade, renamed No. 7 (Training) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 16 August 1919. Reformed by reducing South-Western Area to Group status on 20 September 1919, and disbanded on 12 April 1926. Reformed on 15 July 1940 as No. 7 (Operational Training) Group, Bomber Command. Renamed No. 92 Group on 11 May 1942. Reformed on 1 November 1944 to control Heavy Conversion Units until disbanded on 21 December 1945.[1]
No. 8 Group RAF 1918-1919
1941-1942
1943-1945
Formed in April 1918, renamed No. 8 (Training) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 15 May 1919. Reformed as No. 8 (Bomber) Group on 1 September 1941, but disbanded on 28 January 1942. The Pathfinder Force was renamed No. 8 (Pathfinder Force) Group on 13 January 1943, and disbanded on 15 December 1945.[1]
No. 9 Group RAF 1918–1919
1940–1944
Formed on 1 April 1918, renamed No. 9 (Operations) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 15 May 1919. Reformed on 9 August 1940 as No. 9 (Fighter) Group, Fighter Command, to cover the North-West England and Northern Ireland. Absorbed into No. 12 Group on 15 September 1944.[1]
No. 10 Group RAF 1918-1932
1940-1945
Formed on 1 April 1918, renamed No. 10 (Operations) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 18 January 1932. Reformed on 1 June 1940 as No. 10 (Fighter) Group to cover South-West England. Absorbed into No. 11 Group on 2 May 1945.[2]
No. 11 Group RAF 1918–1920
1936–1960
1961–1963
1968–1996
Formed on 1 April 1918 as No. 11 (Equipment) Group, and disbanded on 17 May 1918. It was reformed on 22 August 1918, but reduced to No. 11 Wing in May 1920. Reformed on 1 May 1936 as No. 11 (Fighter) Group by renaming Fighting Area, and transferred to Fighter Command on 14 July 1936. Disbanded on 31 December 1960, but reformed on 1 January 1961 by renaming No. 13 Group. Renamed No. 11 (Northern) Sector on 1 April 1963. Reformed on 1 April 1968 within Strike Command to take over the role of Fighter Command. Renamed No. 11 (Air Defence) Group in January 1986. Amalgamated with No. 18 Group on 1 April 1996.[2]
No. 12 Group RAF 1918–1919
1937–1963
Formed in April 1918, renamed No. 12 (Training) Group on 8 August, becoming RAF (Cadet) College on 1 November 1919. Reformed on 1 April 1937 as No. 12 (Fighter) Group to cover the Midlands and North of England. Renamed No 12 (Northern) Sector on 31 March 1963.[2]
No. 13 Group RAF 1918–1961 Formed on 1 April 1918, renamed No. 13 (Training) Group on 8 August 1918, and merged into No. 3 Group on 18 October 1919. Reformed on 15 March 1939 as No. 13 (Fighter) Group to cover the North of England and Scotland, and disbanded on 20 May 1946. Reformed on 16 May 1955, and disbanded on 31 December 1961 by being renamed No. 11 Group.[2]
No. 14 Group RAF 1918–1919
1940–1943
Formed on 1 April 1918 by renaming the Milford Haven Anti-Submarine Group, renamed No. 14 (Operations) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 19 May 1919. Reformed on 20 January 1940 as No. 14 (Fighter) Group by renaming No. 60 Wing in France, and disbanded on 22 June 1940. Reformed in June 1940 to cover Scotland, and disbanded on 15 July 1943.[2]
No. 15 Group RAF 1918–1919
1939–1945
No. 15 (Equipment) Group was formed on 1 April 1918, and disbanded by 27 September 1918 when it was reformed as No. 15 (Aegean) Group to control 62 and 63 Wings until disbanded on 1 September 1919. Reformed on 15 March 1939 as No. 15 (General Reconnaissance) Group, Coastal Command. Disbanded on 1 August 1945.[2]
No. 16 Group RAF 1918–1920
1936–1946
Formed on 1 April 1918 by renaming Northern Training Brigade, renamed No. 16 (Training) Group on 8 August, and disbanded on 7 February 1920. Reformed on 1 December 1936 as No. 16 (Reconnaissance) Group, Coastal Command. Disbanded by being reduced to No. 16 Wing on 8 March 1946.[2]
No. 17 Group RAF 1918–1919
1936–1945
Formed in No. 4 Area in April 1918 and transferred to North-Eastern Area on 8 May 1918. (Training) added on 8 August 1918. Disbanded 18 October 1919. Reformed 1 December 1936 as No. 17 (Training) Group in Coastal Command.[2] Order of battle on 6 June 1944 included No.s 4,5,6,7,9, 131, 132 OTUs and No. 1674 Heavy Conversion Unit.[3] Disbanded 1 September 1945.
No. 18 Group RAF 1918–1919
1938–1996
First formed on 1 April 1918, it was disbanded 18 October 1919. It was reformed on 1 September 1938 as No. 18 (Reconnaissance) Group of Coastal Command. It was disbanded when merged with No. 11 Group on 1 April 1996 to form No. 11/18 Group.[2]
No. 11/18 Group RAF 1996–2000 Formed in 1996 as part of Strike Command, combining No. 11 and 18 Groups. In 2000 its assets were transferred to No. 1 and 3 Groups.[2]
No. 19 Group RAF 1918
1941–1969
Formed in April 1918 as No. 19 (Equipment) Group in York, but disbanded in June. Reformed in early 1941 as No. 19 (General Reconnaissance) Group, Coastal Command, at Mount Wise, Plymouth, relocating to RAF Mount Batten in 1947. Became HQ Southern Maritime Air Region in November 1969.[2]
No. 20 Group RAF 1918–1919
1939–1943
Originally formed on 1 April 1918, but disbanded in September 1919. Reformed in November 1939 as No. 20 (Training) Group, Training Command. Transferred to Technical Training Command in May 1940. Absorbed into No. 22 (Training) Group, August 1943.[4]
No. 21 Group RAF 1918
1926–1934
1938–1955
The group was formed on 1 April 1918 at Montrose within No. 5 Area, but disbanded on being absorbed into No. 20 Group RAF on 1 July 1918. It reformed as No 21 (Training) Group, on 12 April 1926 when No 1 Group was renamed. Part of Inland Area, it disbanded on 1 February 1934. Reformed as No 21 (Training) Group within Training Command and based at Cranwell. It was transferred to Flying Training Command on 27 May 1940 and was responsible for the RAF College and the Service Flying Training Schools from the Midlands northwards. In 1947 and 1953, absorbed No. 91 Group RAF and No. 54 Group RAF, before disbanding in 1955.[4]
No. 22 Group RAF 1918–1919
1926–1940
1943–1972
2006–present
Formed on 1 April 1918 as No. 22 (Operations) Group, in Scotland, and disbanded on 30 May 1919. Reformed on 12 April 1926 from No. 7 Group as No. 22 (Army Co-operation) Group and on 1 December 1940 expanded to become Army Cooperation Command. Reformed on 1 August 1943 as No. 22 (Training) Group, Technical Training Command, until disbanded on 31 January 1972. Reformed on 30 October 2006 as No. 22 (Training) Group when Training Group was renamed.
No. 23 Group RAF 1918
1926–1975
Formed on 1 April 1918 as No. 23 (Equipment) Group, but disbanded in May. Reformed as No. 23 (Training) Group on 12 April 1926 by re-numbering No. 3 Group. Transferred to Training Command on 1 May 1936, and to Flying Training Command on 27 May 1940. Disbanded on 2 May 1975.[4]
No. 24 Group RAF 1918–1919
1936–1975
Formed on 26 June 1918 from No. 46 and 48 Wings. Disbanded 13 June 1919. Reformed on 10 July 1936 as No. 24 (Training) Group, Training Command, and transferred to Technical Training Command on 27 May 1940, becoming No. 24 (Technical Training) Group. Disbanded on 29 December 1975.[4]
No. 25 Group RAF 1918–1920
1937–1948
Formed on 12 August 1918 as No. 25 (Operations) Group, but disbanded in 1920. Reformed on 1 February 1937 when the Armament Group was renamed No. 25 (Armament) Group, Training Command. Transferred to Flying Training Command in 27 May 1940, and disbanded on 15 April 1948.[4]
No. 26 Group RAF 1918–1919
1937–1939
1940–1946
Formed in Egypt as No. 26 (Training) Group in November 1918, but disbanded in 1919. Reformed on 1 December 1937 by renaming the Superintendent of the Reserve and Inspector of Civil Flying Training Schools within Training Command to control Elementary and Reserve Flying Training Schools. Renamed No. 50 (Reserve) Group and transferred to Reserve Command, 3 February 1939. Reformed on 12 February 1940 as No. 26 (Signals) Group in Training Command, and transferred to Technical Training Command on 27 May 1940. Transferred to Bomber Command on 10 February 1942, and amalgamated with No. 60 (Signals) Group to form No. 90 (Signals) Group on 25 April 1946.[4]
No. 27 Group RAF 1918–1919
1941–1958
Originally formed on 29 August 1918 at RAF Bircham Newton as part of the Independent Air Force, and disbanded on 19 May 1919. Reformed on 26 May 1941 as No. 27 (Signals Training) Group, Technical Training Command. Disbanded on 1 October 1958.[4]
No. 28 Group RAF 1918–1919
1942–1950
Formed as No. 28 (Orkney & Shetland Islands) Group under the Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet on 13 July 1918, and disbanded on 15 April 1919. Reformed as No. 28 (Technical Training) Group, Technical Training Command, on 1 November 1942. Disbanded on 6 March 1950.[4]
No. 29 Group RAF 1918–1922
1942–1945
Briefly formed as No 29 (Training) Group in Egypt in early November 1918. Reformed on 27 November 1918 as No. 29 (Operations) Group under Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet. Renamed No. 29 (Fleet) Group in August 1919. Transferred to Coastal Area on 15 September 1919, and disbanded on 31 March 1922. Reformed on 1 July 1942 as No. 29 (Flying Training) Group, Flying Training Command, splitting off from No. 25 Group. Re-absorbed into No. 25 Group in July 1945.[4]
No. 30 Group RAF 1918–1919
1937–1945
Formed at Salonika in August 1918 as No. 30 (Operational) Group, but reduced and renamed No. 16 Wing on 7 April 1919. Reformed on 17 March 1937 as No. 30 (Balloon Barrage) Group, Fighter Command. Transferred to Balloon Command on 1 November 1938, and disbanded on 7 January 1945.[5] Headquartered at Chessington, near Surbiton, Surrey, when in Balloon Command.
No. 31 Group RAF 1918–1919
1939–1941
Formed in Mesopotamia in August 1918 as No. 31 (Operational) Group, and disbanded in April 1919. Reformed on 1 April 1939 as No. 31 (Balloon Barrage) Group in Balloon Command. Disbanded on 13 November 1941.
No. 32 Group RAF 1939–1944 Formed on 1 March 1939 as No. 32 (Balloon Barrage) Group, Balloon Command. Disbanded on 15 November 1944.[5] Headquartered at Claverton Manor, Claverton, near Bath, Somerset.
No. 33 Group RAF 1939–1944 Formed as No. 33 (Balloon Barrage) Group, Balloon Command, on 1 March 1939. Disbanded on 4 September 1944.[5] Headquartered at Parkhead House, Abbey Lane, Sheffield, Yorkshire.
No. 34 Group RAF 1939–1944 Formed as No. 34 (Balloon Barrage) Group, Balloon Command, on 7 April 1940. Disbanded on 19 July 1943.[5] Headquartered at Tor House, Corstorphine Road, Edinburgh.
No. 38 Group RAF 1943–1951
1960–1983
1992–2000
2014–present
Formed on 11 October 1943 as No. 38 (Airborne Force) Group, Fighter Command. On 1 June 1945 became part of RAF Transport Command, and was disbanded on 1 February 1951. Reformed on 1 January 1960 as No. 38 (Air Support) Group, Transport Command. it was transferred to Strike Command on 1 July 1972, and disbanded on 17 November 1983. Reformed 1 November 1992 as part of Strike Command, and disbanded on 1 April 2000.[5] No. 38 Group was reformed on 2 July 2014, bringing together the RAF's Engineering, Logistics, Communications and Medical Operations units.[6] It is headquartered at RAF Wittering, Lincolnshire.
No. 40 Group RAF 1939–1961 Formed on 3 January 1939 as No. 40 (Maintenance) Group, Maintenance Command. Responsible for all equipment except bombs and explosives. Disbanded on 28 July 1961.[5]
No. 41 Group RAF 1939–1961 Formed on 1 January 1939 as No. 41 (Maintenance) Group, Maintenance Command. Responsible for supply and allocation of aircraft. Disbanded on 21 July 1961.[5]
No. 42 Group RAF 1939–1956 Formed on 1 January 1939 as No. 42 (Maintenance) Group, Maintenance Command. On 17 April 1939 the group assumed responsibility for all ammunition and fuel depots. It was disbanded on 2 January 1956.[5]
No. 43 Group RAF 1939–1956 Formed on 1 January 1939 as No. 43 (Maintenance) Group, Maintenance Command. On 21 September 1939 it assumed responsibility for the salvage of aircraft and equipment. Disbanded on 2 January 1956.[5]
No. 44 Group RAF 1941–1946 No. 44 (Ferry Service) Group was formed on 15 August 1941 from the Overseas Air Movements Control Unit of Ferry Command. Transferred to Transport Command on 25 March 1943, and disbanded on 14 August 1946.[5]
No. 45 Group RAF 1943–1946 No. 45 (Atlantic Ferry) Group was formed 1 April 1943 from Ferry Command when it was reduced to a Group within Transport Command. It was renamed No. 45 (Transport) Group in June 1944, and transferred to Coastal Command on 1 January 1946. Reduced to No. 45 Wing on 15 February 1946.[5]
No. 46 Group RAF 1944–1950
1972–1976
Formed on 17 January 1944 as No. 46 (Transport) Group, but disbanded on 15 October 1949. It was reformed on 1 November 1949 when No. 47 (Transport) Group was renamed, and disbanded on 31 March 1950. It was reformed on 1 September 1972 as No. 46 (Strategic Support) Group, Strike Command, to take over the transport role of Air Support Command. It was merged with No. 38 Group on 1 January 1976.[5]
No. 47 Group RAF 1945–1949 No. 47 (Transport) Group was formed on 1 January 1945 from No. 116 Wing. It was renamed No. 46 Group on 1 November 1949.[5]
No. 48 Group RAF 1945–1946 No. 48 (Transport) Group was formed on 29 October 1945, and disbanded on 15 May 1946.[5]
No. 50 Group RAF 1939–1947 No. 50 (Training) Group was formed on 1 February 1939 by renaming No. 26 (Training) Group and transferring it to Reserve Command. It was transferred to Flying Training Command on 27 May 1940, and disbanded 31 May 1947.[7]
No. 51 Group RAF 1939–1945 No. 51 (Training) Group was formed on 11 May 1939 as part of Reserve Command. It was transferred to Flying Training Command on 27 May 1940, and disbanded 14 July 1945.[7]
No. 52 Group RAF No. 52 (Training) Group was due to form in March 1939 in Reserve Command, but not activated.[7]
No. 53 Group RAF No. 53 (Training) Group was due to form in March 1939 in Reserve Command, but not activated.[7]
No. 54 Group RAF 1939–1946
1951–1953
No. 54 (Training) Group was formed 30 August 1939 in Reserve Command to control Initial Training Wings. It was transferred to Flying Training Command on 27 May 1940, and disbanded on 17 June 1946. It was reformed on 1 April 1951 to control Initial Training Wings and Grading Schools. All units were transferred to No. 21 Group on 24 June 1953. Disbanded 10 July 1953.[7]
No. 60 Group RAF 1940–1946 No. 60 (Signals) Group was formed on 23 March 1940 to control RDF (Radar) Stations and other Radio units in Fighter Command. Amalgamated with No. 26 (Signals) Group to form No. 90 (Signals) Group on 25 April 1946.[7]
No. 61 Group RAF 1940
1946–1959
No. 61 Group was first formed on 1 July 1940 in Northern Ireland, and was raised to Command status and renamed RAF in Northern Ireland on 1 August 1940. Reformed as No. 61 (Eastern Reserve) Group on 2 May 1946 within Reserve Command, it was renamed No. 61 (Eastern) Group on 1 August 1950 and transferred to Home Command. It was renamed No. 61 (Southern Reserve) Group on 1 January 1957, and disbanded 31 May 1959.[7]
No. 62 Group RAF 1946–1957 No. 62 (Southern Reserve) Group was formed on 15 May 1946 within Reserve Command, and renamed No. 62 (Southern) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was absorbed into No. 61 Group on 1 January 1957.[7]
No. 63 Group RAF 1946–1957 No. 63 (Western & Welsh Reserve) Group was formed on 2 May 1946 within Reserve Command, and renamed No. 63 (Western & Welsh) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was disbanded on 1 February 1957.[7]
No. 64 Group RAF 1946–1958/9 No. 64 (Northern Reserve) Group was formed on 2 May 1946 within Reserve Command, and was renamed No. 64 (Northern) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was disbanded in 1958 or 1959.[7]
No. 65 Group RAF 1946–1950/1 No. 65 (London Reserve) Group was formed on 2 May 1946 within Reserve Command, and renamed No. 65 (London) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was disbanded in 1950 or 1951.[7]
No. 66 Group RAF 1946–1956/7 No. 66 (Scottish Reserve) Group was formed on 2 May 1946 within Reserve Command and renamed No. 66 (Scottish) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was disbanded in 1956 or 1957.[7]
No. 67 Group RAF 1950–1957 No. 67 (Northern Ireland Reserve) Group was formed on 31 March 1950 from RAF in Northern Ireland. It was renamed No. 67 (Northern Ireland) Group on 1 August 1950 when transferred to Home Command. It was disbanded on 28 February 1957.[7]
No. 70 Group RAF 1940–1955 No. 70 (Army Co-Operation Training) Group was formed on 25 November 1940 from No. 22 (Army Co-operation) Group, Fighter Command. It was transferred to Army Cooperation Command on 1 December 1940, and to Air Defence of Great Britain on 1 June 1943, and finally disbanded on 17 July 1945.[8] Order of battle on 1 June 1944, mostly target-towing Hurricanes.[9]
No. 71 Group RAF 1940–1941 No. 71 (Army Co-Operation) Group was formed on 25 November 1940 from No. 22 (Army Co-operation) Group, Fighter Command. It was transferred to Army Cooperation Command on 1 December 1940, and disbanded on 14 August 1941.[8]
No. 72 Group RAF 1942–1943 No. 72 (Army Co-Operation Training) Group was formed on 16 September 1942 within Army Cooperation Command. It was disbanded on 1 August 1943.[8]
No. 81 Group RAF 1940–1943
1952–1958
No. 81 (Training) Group was formed on 16 December 1940 in Fighter Command to control Fighter Operational Training Units, and was disbanded on 20 April 1943.[8] Reformed as part of Fighter Command in January 1952 to control the command's training units. Disbanded in 1957.[10]
No. 82 Group RAF 1941–1942 No. 82 (Fighter) Group was formed on 21 July 1941, and absorbed into RAF in Northern Ireland on 15 October 1942.[8]
No. 83 Expeditionary Air Group RAF 1943–1946
1952–1958
2006–present
Formed on 1 April 1943 as No. 83 (Composite) Group, 2nd Tactical Air Force, and was absorbed into No. 84 Group on 21 April 1946. Reformed on 9 July 1952 as No. 83 Group, part of the British Air Forces of Occupation in Germany, until disbanded on 16 June 1958. Reformed as No. 83 Expeditionary Air Group on 1 April 2006 in the Middle East to support operations in the region.
No. 84 Group RAF 1943–1947 No. 84 (Composite) Group was formed on 15 July 1943 within 2nd Tactical Air Force. It was disbanded on 15 December 1947.[8]
No. 85 Group RAF 1943–1946
1948–1950
No. 85 Group was formed on 17 December 1943 within 2nd Tactical Air Force from wings of the RAF Airfield Construction Service. It was renamed No. 85 (Base) Group on 14 February 1944, and reduced to the status of No. 85 Wing on 1 July 1946. It was reformed on 1 December 1948, and disbanded on 1 July 1950.[8]
No. 87 Group RAF 1945–1956 No. 87 (Transport) Group was formed on 17 February 1945, and renamed No. 87 (Transport) Group on 15 July 1945. Allocated to 2nd Tactical Air Force/British Air Forces of Occupation, it was reduced to the status of No. 87 Wing on 15 July 1946.[8]
No. 88 Group RAF 1945 No. 88 (Fighter) Group was formed in Edinburgh on 7 May 1945 for operations in Norway, and was finally disbanded on 31 December 1945.[8][11]
No. 90 Group RAF 1946–1958
1969–1973
No 26. Group and No 60. Group were amalgamated to form No 90. (Signals) Group on 24 April 1946 under the administrative control of British Air Forces of Occupation and Transport Command. It became an Independent Group in 1951 or 1952. It was raised to RAF Signals Command on 3 November 1958, reverting to Group status on 1 January 1969 within Strike Command. It was transferred to Maintenance Command on 1 September 1972 and disbanded on 31 August 1973,[8] becoming part of RAF Support Command.[12]
No. 91 Group RAF 1942–1947 No. 91 (Training) Group was formed on 11 May 1942 by renaming No. 6 Group. It was renamed No. 21 Group on 1 May 1947.[8]
No. 92 Group RAF 1942–1945 No. 92 (Training) Group was formed on 11 May 1942 by renaming No. 7 Group. It was disbanded on 15 July 1945.[8]
No. 93 Group RAF 1942–1945 No. 93 (Training) Group was formed on 15 June 1942, and disbanded on 14 February 1945.[8]
No. 100 Group RAF 1943–1945 No. 100 (Special Duties) Group was formed on 3 December 1943 within Bomber Command for electronic warfare and countermeasures. It was disbanded on 17 December 1945.[8]
No. 106 Group RAF 1944–1946 In June 1943, No. 1 PRU was formed into No. 106 Wing, with five squadrons (Nos. 540 to 544 inclusive) and an Operational Training Unit. The Wing was elevated to Group status in April 1944 as No. 106 (Photo Reconnaissance) Group,[8] with two Spitfire (541 & 542) and two Mosquito (540 & 544) squadrons.[13] It was disbanded on 15 August 1946.[8]
No. 200 Group RAF 1939–1942 No. 200 (Coastal) Group was formed on 25 September 1939 under the control of HQ RAF Mediterranean to control units operating from Gibraltar. It was transferred to Coastal Command in November/December 1940, and renamed AHQ Gibraltar on 1 May 1942.[14]
No. 201 Group RAF 1939–1944 No. 201 (General Reconnaissance) Group was formed on 18 September 1939 from the General Reconnaissance Group, Middle East. It was renamed No. 201 (Naval Co-operation) Group on 3 October 1941, and absorbed into Air Defence Eastern Mediterranean on 1 February 1944.[14]
No. 202 Group RAF 1939–1941
1944
No. 202 (Operations) Group was formed on 21 September 1939 by renaming RAF Egypt Group, and was absorbed in No. 204 Group on 12 April 1941. It was reformed on 26 May 1941, and renamed AHQ Egypt on 1 December 1941. It was reformed on 11 July 1944 to administer RAF units involved on Operation Dragoon, and was disbanded on 7 November 1944.[14]
No. 203 Group RAF 1940–1945 No. 203 (Maintenance) Group was formed on 17 August 1940 from HQ RAF Sudan. It was renamed No. 203 (Training) Group on 10 May 1943, and disbanded on 28 February 1945.[14]
No. 204 Group RAF 1941 No. 204 (Operations) Group was formed on 12 April 1941 by renaming HQ RAF Cyrenaica. It was renamed AHQ Western Desert on 21 October 1941.[14]
No. 205 Group RAF 1941–1956 No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group was formed on 23 October 1941 by renaming No. 257 Wing. It was disbanded on 15 April 1956.[14]
No. 206 Group RAF 1941–1946
1951–1954
No. 206 (Maintenance) Group was formed on 1 September 1941 by renaming Maintenance Group, and was disbanded on 28 February 1946. Reformed on 1 June 1951 as No. 206 (Base Maintenance) Group, it was disbanded on 31 August 1954.[14]
No. 207 Group RAF 1941–1942 No. 207 (General Purpose) Group was formed on 15 December 1941 by renaming AHQ East Africa, reverting to AHQ East Africa on 16 November 1942.[14]
No. 209 Group RAF 1942–1944 No. 209 (Fighter) Group was formed on 15 December 1942 by upgrading No. 263 Wing. It was disbanded on 15 November 1944.[14]
No. 210 Group RAF 1943–1945 No. 210 (Fighter) Group was formed on 1 May 1943, and was disbanded on 1 May 1944. It was reformed on 6 July 1944 to control coastal air forces in North Africa and Western Mediterranean, and transferred to AHQ Malta in January 1945. It was disbanded on 25 April 1945.[14]
No. 211 Group RAF 1941–1945 No. 211 (Medium Bomber) Group was formed on 10 December 1941 by renaming Nucleus Group Western Desert. It was disbanded on 3 February 1942. Reformed as No. 211 (Offensive Fighter) Group on 12 March 1942, but reduced to 'Z' Sector, Northwest African Air Forces on 17 September 1943.[14]
No. 212 Group RAF 1942–1946 No. 212 (Fighter Control) Group was formed on 1 December 1942, as part of the Western Desert Air Force. It was later transferred to AHQ Egypt, and eventually disbanded on 31 January 1946.[14]
No. 213 Group RAF 1941–1943 No. 213 (Operational) Group was formed on 15 December 1941 by renaming Advanced AHQ Levant. It was disbanded on 15 November 1943.[14]
No. 214 Group RAF 1942–1945 No. 214 Group was formed on 1 January 1942 as part of AHQ Iraq, and was merged with No. 217 Group on 30 November 1942. Reformed on 15 April 1943 as No. 214 (Maintenance) Group, it was disbanded on 31 December 1945.[14]
No. 215 Group RAF 1942–1943 No. 215 (General Reconnaissance) Group was formed on 1 May 1942 at Basrah. It was disbanded on 1 November 1943.[14]
No. 216 Group RAF 1942–1946 No. 216 (Ferry) Group was formed on 21 May 1942 , and was renamed No. 216 (Air Transport and Ferry) Group on 9 September 1942. It was disbanded on 26 October 1946.[14]
No. 217 Group RAF 1942–1943
1943–1944
No. 217 (Paiforce) Group was formed on 18 September 1942 from Persian Group, and was disbanded on 1 May 1943. Reformed on 3 November 1943 within RAF Middle East, it was disbanded on 29 February 1944.[14]
No. 218 Group RAF 1942–1943
1943–1946
No. 218 (Maintenance) Group was formed on 1 October 1942, and disbanded on 17 April 1943. Reformed on 30 November 1943, it was disbanded on 20 June 1946.[14]
No. 219 Group RAF 1942–1944
1946
No. 219 (Fighter) Group was formed on 6 December 1942 as No. 219 (Fighter) Group, subordinate to AHQ Eastern Mediterranean, and was disbanded on 27 July 1944. It was reformed on 1 March 1946 by amalgamating AHQ Eastern Mediterranean, AHQ Egypt and No. 206 Group. It was amalgamated with No. 205 Group on 1 December 1946.[14]
No. 221 Group RAF 1941–1942
1942–1945
No. 221 Group was formed on 21 April 1941 in Burma. Later renamed BURGROUP, it reverted to No. 221 Group on 15 December 1941. In February 1942 it was again renamed, this time as NORGROUP. It was disbanded on 12 March 1942. Reformed on 12 March 1942 as a composite group in India, and later renamed first as No. 221 (Bomber) Group and then as No. 221 (Tactical) Group. It was disbanded on 30 September 1945.[14]
No. 222 Group RAF 1941–1945 No. 222 (General Reconnaissance) Group was formed on 1 September 1941. It was renamed AHQ Ceylon on 15 October 1945.[14]
No. 223 Group RAF 1941
1942–1945
No. 223 Group was formed on 9 August 1941 by renaming AHQ Far East. Renamed NORGROUP on 24 November 1941. Reformed on 1 May 1942 as No. 223 (Composite) Group by renumbering No. 1 (Indian) Group. Renamed No. 1 (Indian) Group on 15 August 1945.[14]
No. 224 Group RAF 1942–1945
1957–1968
No. 224 (Fighter) Group was formed on 3 January 1942, but was disbanded on 28 March 1942. Reformed on 1 April 1942, and renamed No. 224 (Tactical) Group on 1 December 1942. Disbanded by renaming as AHQ Malaya on 30 September 1945. Reformed on 31 August 1957 from AHQ Malaya, it was disbanded on 1 October 1968.[14]
No. 225 Group RAF 1942
1942–1945
No. 225 (Bomber) Group was formed on 17 January 1942 by renaming No. 223 Group. It was disbanded on 28 March 1942. Reformed as No. 225 (Composite) Group on 20 April 1942. It absorbed No. 2 (Indian) Group on 12 April 1942. Renamed No. 2 (Indian) Group on 1 October 1945.[14]
No. 226 Group RAF 1942
1942–1946
No. 226 (Fighter) Group was formed on 18 January 1942 in Singapore. After the surrender the number was reused to control fighters in defence of Java. Not formally disbanded, but ceased to exist in March 1942. It was reformed on 9 May 1942 as No. 226 (Maintenance) Group, and was disbanded on 31 July 1946.[14]
No. 227 Group RAF 1942–1946 No. 227 (Training) Group was formed on 6 June 1942. It was renumbered No. 4 (Indian) Group on 1 May 1946.[14]
No. 228 Group RAF 1943
1945–1946
No. 228 Group was formed on 22 February 1943, and disbanded on 15 May 1943. Reformed on 27 February 1945 as No. 228 (Administrative) Group, and renumbered, No. 3 (Indian) Group on 1 May 1946.[14]
No. 229 Group RAF 1943–1947 No. 229 (Transport) Group was formed on 16 December 1943 from No. 179 Wing. It was disbanded on 31 March 1947.[14]
No. 230 Group RAF 1943–1945
1952–1953
No. 230 (Maintenance) Group was formed on 15 December 1943, and absorbed into AHQ Burma on 16 May 1945. It was reformed on 1 April 1952, and renamed AHQ Singapore on 16 February 1953.[14]
No. 231 Group RAF 1943–1945 No. 231 (Bomber) Group was formed on 13 December 1943. It was disbanded on 30 September 1945.[14]
No. 232 Group RAF 1945–1946 No. 232 (Transport) Group was formed in March 1945, and was disbanded on 15 August 1946. Officially a Transport Command Group, operating under control of HQ Air Command South East Asia.[14]
No. 233 Group RAF 1945–1946 No. 233 Group was formed on 28 March 1945, but was disbanded on 30 June 1946. It was planned to control RAF units allocated to Operation Roger.[14]
No. 238 Group RAF 1945 No. 238 (Airborne Assault) Group was formed on 20 April 1945, and was reduced to No. 238 Wing on 11 September 1945.[14]
No. 241 Group RAF 1942 No. 241 (Special Operations) Group was formed on 1 January 1942 in London, intended for operations in the Far East. It was disbanded on 14 July 1942 without becoming operational.[14]
No. 242 Group RAF 1942–1944 No. 242 Group was formed on 24 August 1942 in North Africa. It was disbanded on 14 September 1944.[14]
No. 246 Group RAF 1943 No. 246 Group was formed on 3 July 1943, but was disbanded on 9 August 1943. It was formed on to control RAF units for the proposed defence of Portuguese airfields.[14]
No. 247 Group RAF 1943–1946 No. 247 Group was formed in October 1943 within Coastal Command to control units operating from the Azores. It was disbanded on 1 March 1946.[14]
No. 300 Group RAF 1945–1946 Formed in Australia in late 1944 as No. 300 Wing, becoming No. 300 (Transport) Group on 24 April 1945. It was reduced to wing status on 31 March 1946. Officially part of Transport Command, it operated under control of HQ Air Command South East Asia[14] to support the British Pacific Fleet.
No. 333 Group RAF 1942 No. 333 (Special Operational) Group was formed on 1 September 1942 for Operation Torch, and became Eastern Air Command on 19 November 1942.[14]
Air Defence Group RAF 1927 Air Defence Group was formed on 18 July 1927 by renaming HQ Special Reserve and Auxiliary Air Force. It was renamed No. 1 Air Defence Group on 25 August 1927.[15]
Armament Group RAF 1934–1937 Armament Group was formed on 1 February 1934. Transferred to Training Command on 1 May 1936, it was renamed No. 25 Group on 1 December 1937.[15]
Experimental Group RAF 1918–1919 Experimental Group was formed on 16 August 1918 to control RAF experimental establishments. It was disbanded on 1 January 1919.[15]
Firth of Forth Group RAF 1918– Firth of Forth Group was formed on 1 November 1918 to control RAF bases at Turnhouse, Rosyth and Donibristle.[15]
Technical Group RAF 1918– Technical Group was formed on November 1918 to control 2, 7, 8 & 10 Aircraft Acceptance Parks.[15]
Training Group RAF 1994–2006 Training Group (Defence Agency) was formed on 1 April 1994 within Personnel and Training Command. Became Chief Executive, Training Group Defence Agency and AOC, Training Group in 1996 or 1997. Disbanded by being renamed No. 22 (Training) Group on 30 October 2006.[15]
Indian Group RAF 1921–1922 Formed on 1 January 1921 when RAF India Command was demoted to group status.[16] It was reorganised in October 1921, divided into four wings from two, although the number of squadrons were not increased.[17] It ceased to exist when re-raised to command status on 1 April 1922.[16]
No. 1 (Indian) Group RAF 1928–1947 Part of Royal Air Force, India.
No. 2 (Indian) Group RAF 1940–1947 Part of Royal Air Force, India.
No. 3 (Indian) Group RAF Part of Royal Air Force, India.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 1-9". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 1 May 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 10-19". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  3. ^ Niehorster, Leo (2015). "No. 17 Group RAF, 6 June 1944". World War II Armed Forces: Orders of Battle and Organizations. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 20-29". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 30-48". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "RAF 38 Group Reforming Parade". Royal Air Force. 3 July 2014. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 50-67". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 70-106". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  9. ^ Niehorster, Leo (2015). "No. 70 Group RAF, 6 June 1944". World War II Armed Forces: Orders of Battle and Organizations. Retrieved 29 April 2015. 
  10. ^ Rawlings, John D. (1984). The History of the Royal Air Force. Temple Press Aerospace. pp. 206–207. 
  11. ^ Barrass, M. B. (2015). "88 Group". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  12. ^ "RAF Timeline 1970–1979". Royal Air Force. 2015. Retrieved 1 May 2015. 
  13. ^ "Allied Expeditionary Air Force". Royal Air Force. 2015. Retrieved 1 May 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Groups 200-333". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Named Groups and Other Formations with Group status". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  16. ^ a b Barrass, M. B. (2015). "Overseas Commands - Iraq, India and the Far East". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 1 May 2015. 
  17. ^ "Reorganisation of the RAF in India". Flight XIII (669): 686. 20 October 1921. Retrieved 1 May 2015.