List of Southeastern Conference national championships

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The list of Southeastern Conference national championships begins in 1933, the first year of competition for the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and includes 202 team national championships sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and four additional national championships sanctioned by the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW), won by current conference members through the end of the 2012−13 academic year.[1] During the 2013−14 academic year, SEC members won a total of six national championships, including women's gymnastics (Florida), women's swimming and diving (Georgia), equestrian (Georgia), men's golf (Alabama), softball (Florida), and baseball (Vanderbilt). The SEC has averaged almost seven national championships per year since 1990.[2]

Listed below are all championship teams of NCAA-sponsored events, as well as the titles won in football and equestrian, which are not official NCAA-sanctioned championships. Conference members have won at least one title in every sponsored sport in which the SEC participates except for women's volleyball. Between 1979 and 1982, teams representing current member universities also claimed four AIAW Championships.

Fall sports[edit]

Football (38 claimed)[edit]

The NCAA does not name an official champion for Division I-A/FBS football. The following table lists national titles that are reported by the NCAA's web page "Past Division I-A Football National Champions". Schools don't necessarily claim each of the championships listed and some schools may claim championships awarded by a source while another school may not claim championships given by the same source.

Pre-SEC

  • Prior to 1932, Vanderbilt was named national champion in football in 1906 and 1911 by Billingsley.
  • Prior to 1932, LSU was named national champion in football in 1908 by the National Championship Foundation.
  • Prior to 1932, Auburn was named national champion in football in 1910 by Maxwell, 1913 by Billingsley, and 1914 by Howell.
  • Prior to 1932, Alabama claimed national championships in football in 1925, 1926, and 1930.
  • Prior to 1932, Georgia was named national champion in football in 1927 by the Boand and Poling polls.
  • Prior to 1932, former member Georgia Tech claimed football national titles in 1917 and 1928.
  • Prior to joining the SEC in 1992, Arkansas claimed the 1964 football championship.
  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M claimed national titles in 1919, 1927, and 1939, all awarded by multiple selectors.
  • Bold type indicates title is officially claimed by the university.
Year School Source Officially Claimed
1934 Alabama Dunkel, Houlgate, Poling, Williamson, Ronnie Bunch Yes
1935 LSU Williamson No
1936 LSU Williamson No
1938 Tennessee Billingsley, Boand, Dunkel, Football Research, Houlgate, Litkenhous, Poling, Sagarin Yes
1940 Tennessee Dunkel, Williamson Yes
1941 Alabama Houlgate Yes
1942 Georgia Berryman, DeVold, Houlgate, Litkenhous, Poling, Williamson Yes
1945 Alabama National Championship Foundation No
1946 Georgia Williamson No
1950 Kentucky Sagarin Yes
1950 Tennessee Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, National Championship Foundation Yes
1951 Tennessee AP, Litkenhous, UPI, Williamson Yes
1951 Georgia Tech Berryman, Boand No
1952 Georgia Tech Berryman, INS, Poling Yes
1956 Tennessee Sagarin No
1956 Georgia Tech Berryman No
1957 Auburn AP, Football Research, Helms, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Williamson Yes
1958 LSU AP, Berryman, Billingsley, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, FB News, Football Research, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Sagarin, UPI, Williamson Yes
1959 Ole Miss Berryman, Dunkel Yes
1960 Ole Miss Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, FW, National Championship Foundation, Williamson Yes
1961 Alabama AP, Berryman, Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, FB News, Football Research, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, NFF, Sagarin, UPI, Williamson Yes
1962 LSU Berryman No
1962 Ole Miss Billingsley, Litkenhous Yes
1964 Alabama AP, Berryman, Litkenhous, UPI Yes
1965 Alabama AP, Billingsley, Football Research, FW, National Championship Foundation Yes
1966 Alabama Berryman No
1967 Tennessee Litkenhous Yes
1968 Georgia Litkenhous No
1973 Alabama Berryman, UPI Yes
1975 Alabama Matthews No
1977 Alabama Football Research No
1978 Alabama AP, FACT, Football Research, FW, Helms, National Championship Foundation, NFF Yes
1979 Alabama AP, Berryman, Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, FACT, FB News, FW, Helms, Matthews, National Championship Foundation, NFF, NY Times, Poling, Sagarin, Sporting News, UPI Yes
1980 Georgia AP, Berryman, FACT, FB News, FW, Helms, National Championship Foundation, NFF, Poling, Sporting News, UPI Yes
1983 Auburn FACT, Football Research, NY Times No
1984 Florida Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, FACT, Matthews, NY Times, Sagarin, Sporting News No
1992 Alabama AP, Berryman, Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, Eck, FACT, FB News, Football Research, FW, Matthews, National Championship Foundation, NY Times, Sporting News, UPI/NFF, USA/CNN Yes
1993 Auburn National Championship Foundation No
1996 Florida AP, Berryman, Billingsley, Eck, FACT, FB News, FW, NFF, Sagarin, Sporting News, USA/CNN, NY Times, National Championship Foundation, Dunkel, Matthews, DeVold Yes
1998 Tennessee Alderson, AP, BCS, Berryman, Billingsley, DeVold, Dunkel, Eck, FACT, FB News, FW, Matthews, National Championship Foundation, NFF, NY Times, Seattle Times, Sporting News, USA/ESPN Yes
2003 LSU AP, BCS, Billingsley, Colley, DeVold, Dunkel, FACT, Massey, NFF, Sagarin, Seattle Times, USA/ESPN Yes
2006 Florida BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2007 LSU BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2008 Florida BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2009 Alabama BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2010 Auburn BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2011 Alabama BCS, USA Today, AP Yes
2012 Alabama BCS, USA Today, AP Yes

Men's cross country (8)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 1992, Arkansas won four titles in men's cross country.
Year School
1972 Tennessee
1991 Arkansas
1992 Arkansas
1993 Arkansas
1995 Arkansas
1998 Arkansas
1999 Arkansas
2000 Arkansas

Women's cross country (1)[edit]

Year School
1988 Kentucky

Women's soccer (1)[edit]

Year School
1998 Florida

Winter sports[edit]

Men's basketball (11 official, 3 more claimed)[edit]

Prior to 1939 the NCAA did not sanction a post-season tournament to determine a national champion. Some schools claim basketball national championships based on polls from this era.

Year School Notes
1933 Kentucky MNC claim based on Helms Athletic Foundation
1935 LSU MNC claim based on winning the American Legion Bowl National Championship game
1948 Kentucky
1949 Kentucky
1951 Kentucky
1954 Kentucky MNC claim based on Helms Athletic Foundation
1958 Kentucky
1978 Kentucky
1994 Arkansas
1996 Kentucky
1998 Kentucky
2006 Florida
2007 Florida
2012 Kentucky

Women's basketball (8)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won one women's basketball title (in 2011).
Year School
1987 Tennessee
1989 Tennessee
1991 Tennessee
1996 Tennessee
1997 Tennessee
1998 Tennessee
2007 Tennessee
2008 Tennessee

Women's gymnastics (19)[edit]

Year School
1982 Florida
1987 Georgia
1988 Alabama
1989 Georgia
1991 Alabama
1993 Georgia
1996 Alabama
1998 Georgia
1999 Georgia
2002 Alabama
2005 Georgia
2006 Georgia
2007 Georgia
2008 Georgia
2009 Georgia
2011 Alabama
2012 Alabama
2013 Florida
2014 Florida (co-champions)*
* Florida shared the 2014 national title with Oklahoma
See also: AIAW Champions

Note before 1981, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was the sole governing body for women's intercollegiate athletics and sponsored national championships in women's sports. Starting in 1981, the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) began to sponsor women's athletic championships as well as those for men's sports. During the 1981–82 school year, the AIAW and NCAA both sponsored championships in several women's sports. Starting in 1982–83, the NCAA became the sole sponsor of women's intercollegiate sports championships and national championships in those sports.

Men's indoor track and field (18)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 1992, Arkansas won eight titles in men's indoor track.
  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Missouri won one title in men's indoor track.
Year School
1992 Arkansas
1993 Arkansas
1994 Arkansas
1995 Arkansas
1997 Arkansas
1998 Arkansas
1999 Arkansas
2000 Arkansas
2001 LSU
2002 Tennessee
2003 Arkansas
2004 LSU
2005 Arkansas
2006 Arkansas
2010 Florida
2011 Florida
2012 Florida
2013 Arkansas

Women's indoor track and field (14)[edit]

Year School
1987 LSU
1989 LSU
1991 LSU
1992 Florida
1993 LSU
1994 LSU
1995 LSU
1996 LSU
1997 LSU
2002 LSU
2003 LSU
2004 LSU
2005 Tennessee
2009 Tennessee

Men's swimming and diving (11)[edit]

Year School
1978 Tennessee
1983 Florida
1984 Florida
1997 Auburn
1999 Auburn
2003 Auburn
2004 Auburn
2005 Auburn
2006 Auburn
2007 Auburn
2009 Auburn

Women's swimming and diving (14)[edit]

Year School
1979 Florida
1982 Florida
1999 Georgia
2000 Georgia
2001 Georgia
2002 Auburn
2003 Auburn
2004 Auburn
2005 Georgia
2006 Auburn
2007 Auburn
2010 Florida
2013 Georgia
2014 Georgia
See also: AIAW Champions

Note before 1981, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was the sole governing body for women's intercollegiate athletics and sponsored national championships in women's sports. Starting in 1981, the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) began to sponsor women's athletic championships as well as those for men's sports. During the 1981–82 school year, the AIAW and NCAA both sponsored championships in several women's sports. Beginning in 1982–83, the NCAA became the sole sponsor of women's intercollegiate sports championships and national championships in those sports.

Women's bowling (1)[edit]

Year School
2007 Vanderbilt

Note that the SEC does not sponsor bowling.

Rifle (1)[edit]

Year School
2011 Kentucky

Note that the SEC does not sponsor rifle. Kentucky is a member of the single-sport Great America Rifle Conference.

Spring sports[edit]

Baseball (10)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Missouri won one national title (in 1954).
Year School
1990 Georgia
1991 LSU
1993 LSU
1996 LSU
1997 LSU
2000 LSU
2009 LSU
2010 South Carolina
2011 South Carolina
2014 Vanderbilt

Softball (2)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won one AIAW national title (1982) and two NCAA national titles (1983 and 1987).
Year School
2012 Alabama
2014 Florida

Men's outdoor track and field (18*)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 1992, Arkansas won one title in men's outdoor track.
  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won three titles in men's outdoor track.
Year School
1933 LSU
1974 Tennessee
1989 LSU
1990 LSU
1991 Tennessee
1992 Arkansas
1993 Arkansas
1994 Arkansas
1995 Arkansas
1996 Arkansas
1997 Arkansas
1998 Arkansas
1999 Arkansas
2001 Tennessee
2002 LSU
2003 Arkansas
2004* Arkansas (vacated)*
2005* Arkansas (vacated)*
2012 Florida
2013 Texas A&M/Florida***
* Arkansas was forced to vacate the NCAA titles won in 2004 and 2005 because of recruiting violations with Tyson Gay. Florida finished second both years.[3][4]
*** Texas A&M and Florida finished tied for the national title at the 2013 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championship.

Women's outdoor track and field (17*)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won three titles in women's outdoor track.
Year School
1987 LSU
1988 LSU
1989 LSU
1990 LSU
1991 LSU
1992 LSU
1993 LSU
1994 LSU
1995 LSU
1996 LSU
1997 LSU
2000 LSU
2002 South Carolina
2003 LSU
2006 Auburn
2008 LSU
*2012 *LSU (vacated)
2014 Texas A&M
  • LSU was forced to vacate the 2012 Women's Outdoor Track and Field Championship due to positive testing for banned substances in one athlete.[5]

Men's tennis (7)[edit]

Year School
1959 Tulane
1985 Georgia
1987 Georgia
1999 Georgia
2001 Georgia
2007 Georgia
2008 Georgia

Women's tennis (8)[edit]

Year School
1992 Florida
1994 Georgia
1996 Florida
1998 Florida
2000 Georgia
2003 Florida
2011 Florida
2012 Florida

Men's golf (12)[edit]

  • Prior to joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won one national title (in 2009).
Year School
1940 LSU
1942 LSU
1947 LSU
1955 LSU
1968 Florida
1973 Florida
1993 Florida
1999 Georgia
2001 Florida
2005 Georgia
2013 Alabama
2014 Alabama

Women's golf (4)[edit]

Year School
1985 Florida
1986 Florida
2001 Georgia
2012 Alabama

Defunct NCAA championships[edit]

Men's boxing (1)[edit]

Year School
1949 LSU

NCAA emerging sports[edit]

Equestrian (11)[edit]

  • The NCAA does not yet sanction a championship for Equestrian.[6] The following is a list of non-NCAA championships won by SEC schools.[7] The SEC began sponsoring equestrian as a conference sport during the 2012–13 school year, with Auburn, Georgia, South Carolina and Texas A&M participating.
  • Before joining the SEC in 2012, Texas A&M won two national titles (in 2002 and 2012).
Year School
2003 Georgia
2004 Georgia
2005 South Carolina
2006 Auburn
2007 South Carolina
2008 Georgia
2009 Georgia
2010 Georgia
2011 Auburn
2013 Auburn
2014 Georgia

Totals by school[edit]

The following table ranks the current SEC schools by the number of NCAA recognized national championships each school has won. This does not include Division I-A/FBS football championships, equestrian championships, or unofficial championships in other sports such as men's basketball. However, it does include AIAW titles, which the NCAA has retroactively recognized as equivalent to its own national championships. The totals below include any championships that may have been won before the school was a member of the SEC.

In addition, some recognized national championships are in sports that are not (or were not) sponsored by the SEC:

  • Kentucky's total includes one championship in rifle, which the SEC has never sponsored.
  • Vanderbilt's total includes a national title in women's bowling, another sport yet to be sponsored by the SEC.
NCAA/AIAW Titles School
42 Arkansas
42 LSU
30 Florida
28 Georgia
17 Tennessee
14 Auburn
13 Texas A&M
10 Alabama
10 Kentucky
3 South Carolina
2 Missouri
2 Vanderbilt
0 Mississippi State
0 Ole Miss

See also[edit]

References[edit]