List of Spanish general officers (Peninsular War)

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The following list of Spanish general officers (Peninsular War) lists the generals and other general officers who served in the Army of Spain during the Peninsular War (1808–1814). The rank given refers to the ones held until the end of the war in 1814. The list includes foreign nationals who fought in Spanish military units.

Overview[edit]

Napoleon had intended the campaign on the Peninsula to be a walkover, but what he would come to call the Spanish Ulcer,[1] ended up with him having to send in thirteen of his maréchals, and enter Madrid himself. Apart from the original 28,000 troops that had entered Spain under Junot, heading for Portugal, he would have to send in a further two hundred and seventy thousand men — more than half of the empire’s total military strength.[1]

List[edit]

Name Command Action seen Notes
Acevedo (1726 – 1808)
(General)
Battle of Valmaseda;
Battle of EspinosaWiA/KiA
Badly wounded at Espinosa, he was killed shortly afterwards when he and his second-in-command, General Riego, were captured. Riego was taken prisoner and sent to France.
Alava (7 July 1770 – 14 July 1843)
(General)
Salamanca (Battle of);
Vitoria (Battle of);
Bussaco (Battle of);
Ciudad Rodrigo (Siege of);
Badajoz (Siege of);
Alava was the liaison with the British headquarters, and became one of Wellington's aides-de-camp, spending the Peninsular War attached to Wellington's staff.
Albuquerque (Duke of) (1775 – 1811)
(General)
Talavera (Battle of);
Arzobispo (Battle of);
Alcedo (1735–1812) Governor of La Coruña Battle of La Coruña Alcedo's garrison was able to hold back Marshall Soult's forces while Sir John Moore's troops embarked for Britain, following the Battle of Corunna. He finally surrendered on 18 January 1809.
Álvarez de Castro (8 September 1749 – 21 January 1810)
(General)
Army of Catalonia and Governor of Girona Gerona (Third siege of) – PoW (died in captivity) As commander of Montjuïc Castle in Barcelona, Álvarez had been prepared to resist the French occupation of the city. When his superiors ordered him to hand it over to French troops without resistance, Álvarez fled to Girona where, with only 5,600 men under arms, the city resisted over the next seven months against 18,000 French troops.
Anglona (Prince of) (1786–1851) Tamames (Battle of);
Alba de Tormes (Battle of);
Barrosa (Battle of);
On 30 October 1812, he was sent by the Cortes to arrest General Francisco Ballesteros, commander of the 4th Army who, earlier that month, had called for a military uprising in protest against Wellington's appointment as generalissimo of the Spanish Army.[2]
Aréizaga (before 1775 – 1816)
(General)
Alcañiz (Battle of);
Ocana (Battle of);
Ballesteros (1770 – June 29, 1832)
(General)
4th Army Albuera (Battle of);
Ballesteros was arrested and relieved of his command in October 1812, and exiled for protesting against Wellington having been named generalissimo (supreme commander) of the Spanish armies on 22 September 1812 and for trying to instigate an uprising.[2]
Belestá
(General)
Portugal (Invasion of)
Blake (19 August 1759 – 27 April 1827)
(General)
Army of Galicia Medina del Rio Seco (Battle of);
Pancorbo (Battle of);
Valmaseda (Battle of);
Espinosa (Battle of);
Albuera (Battle of);
Valencia (Siege of) PoW
Caraffa
(General)
Portugal (Invasion of)
Cartaojal (21 April 1761 – 22 March 1833)
(General)
Army of the Centre Yébenes (Battle of);
Ciudad Real (Battle of)
Sacked after his disastrous defeat at Ciudad Real.
Castaños (22 April 1758 – 24 September 1852)
(General)
Army of Andalusia Bailén (Battle of);
Tudela (Battle of);
Somosierra (Battle of);
Coupigny (Marques of) Bailén (Battle of);
Tudela (Battle of);
Albuera (Battle of);
Cuesta (9 May 1741 – 26 November 1811)
(General)
Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Spain;
Army of Extremadura
Cabezón (Battle of);
Medina de Rioseco (Battle of);
Medellín (Battle of) WiA;
Talavera (Battle of);
de Eroles, Baron (1784 – 22 August 1825) Molins de Rey (Battle of);
Gerona (Siege of) PoW;
Raid of La Junquera;
Montserrat (Battle of);
Col de Balaguer (Battle of);
Altafulla (Battle of);
Roda de Isábena (Battle of)
d'Espagne (15 August 1775 – 1839)
(General)
Battle of the Gebora;
Albuera (Battle of) WiA;
Badajoz (Siege of) WiA;
Salamanca (Battle of);
Pamplona (Siege of) WiA;
Bayonne (Battle of);
Vitoria (Battle of)
Wellington refers to him as Carlos de España.
Freire (4 November 1765 or 1767 – 7 March 1834 or 1835)
(General)
Commander-in-Chief of the IV Army;
Army of Galicia
Talavera (Battle of);
San Marcial (Battle of);
Bidassoa (Battle of the);
Nivelle (Battle of the);
Toulouse (Battle of);
Girón (1778–1842)
(General)
Bailén (Battle of);
Tudela (Battle of);
Uclés (Battle of);
Albuera (Battle of);
Bidassoa (Battle of the);
Nivelle (Battle of the);
Infantado (Duke of the) (1768 – 1841)
(General)
Uclés (Battle of);
Lacy (11 January 1772 – 5 July 1817)
(General)
Ocana (Battle of);
Llamas
(General)
Llamas' divisions from Valencia and Murcia were incorporated into the Army of the Centre
de Longa (10 April 1783 – 1831)
(General)
Vitoria (Battle of);
Bidassoa (Battle of the);
Pyrenees (Battle of the);
San Marcial (Battle of)
Menacho (died 3 March 1811)
(General)
Badajoz (First siege of) KiA Menacho was the commander of the garrison at Badajoz.
Mendizábal (14 May 1765 – 1 September 1838)
(General)
Gebora (Battle of the);
Albuera (Battle of);
San Marcial (Battle of);
Morillo (5 May 5, 1775 – 27 July 1837)
(General)
Puente Sanpayo (Battle of);
Battle of Vitoria
O'Donnell (1769 – 17 May 1834)
(General)
O'Donojú (1762 – 8 October 1821)
(General)
Zaragoza (First Siege of) PoW O'Donojú was appointed minister of war by the Cortes de Cádiz.
O'Neill (8 January 1736 – 9 December 1814)
O'Neylle (1765 – 24 February 1809)
(General)
Tudela (Battle of)
del Parque (Duke) Tamames (Battle of);
El Carpio (Battle of);
Alba de Tormes (Battle of);
la Peña (1808–1811)
(General)
Cádiz (Siege of);
Barrosa (Battle of);
Reding (5 July 1755 – 23 April 1809)
(General)
3rd Swiss Regiment Reding Bailén (Battle of);
Valls (Battle of) DoW
Riego (7 April 1784 – 7 November 1823)
(General)
Battle of Espinosa PoW He took command of the Spanish forces at Espinosa when his commanding officer, General Acevedo, was badly wounded. Both were later captured shortly afterwards, and Acevedo was killed. Riego was taken prisoner and sent to France.
la Romana (2 October 1761 – 23 January 1811)
(General)
Army of Galicia (from Blake) Evacuation of the La Romana Division;
Villafranca (Battle of);
Also referred to as Marquis of Romana.
Saint-Marcq (1762 – 1831) Valencia (Battle of);
Zaragoza (Siege of) PoW
San Juan (before 1790 – 7 January 1809)
(General)
Somosierra (Battle of) WiA Routed at Somosierra (allowing Napoleon to enter Madrid on 4 November 1808), San Juan withdrew to Talavera, where he was killed by a mob of his own troops, mainly untrained men conscripted specifically for the battle at Somosierra.
Santocildes (29 June 1771 – 6 March 1847)
(General)
Tordesillas (Battle of)
Solano (10 December 1768 – 29 May 1808)
(General)
Captain-General of Andalusia and Governor of Cádiz Portugal (Invasion of) The once-popular Solano was lynched by a mob, accused of being an afrancesado and after having tried to dissuade the population from attacking the Rosily Squadron.
Taboada
(General)
Cogorderos (Battle of)
Taranco (died 18 January 1809)
(General)
Portugal (Invasion of)
Torrijos (20 March 1791 – 11 December 1831)
(General)
Vitoria (Battle of);
Venegas (175 – 1838)
(General)
Bailén (Battle of);
Uclés (Battle of);
Almonacid (Battle of);
Vigodet (1747 – 1834)
(General)
Almonacid (Battle of);
Ocana (Battle of);
Also referred to as Gaspar de Bigodé.
Vives (28 August 1764 – 24 April 1809)
(General)
Cardadeu (Battle of);
Molins de Rey (Battle of);
Vivot (Marques of)
(General)
Whittingham (1772 – 1841)
(General)
Bailén (Battle of);
Medellin (Battle of);
Barrosa (Battle of);
Xegona (Battle of);
Concentayña (Battle of)WiA;
Castalla (Battle of)
Zayas (5 June 1772 – 27 October 1827) Ocaña (Battle of);
Albuera (Battle of);

See also[edit]

References[edit]