List of Tennessee Volunteers head football coaches

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Tennessee Volunteers college football team represents the University of Tennessee in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Vols compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 23 head coaches since its formation during the 1891 season.[1] Since December 7, 2012, Butch Jones has served as head coach of the Volunteers.[2]

The team has played 1,215 games over 118 seasons of Tennessee football.[1] Prior to the 1899 season, the Volunteers did not have an official head coach while compiling a record of twelve wins and eleven losses (.522) between 1891 and 1898.[1] Since 1899, nine coaches have led the Volunteers in postseason bowl games: Robert Neyland, John Barnhill, Bowden Wyatt, Doug Dickey, Bill Battle, Johnny Majors, Phillip Fulmer, Lane Kiffin, and Derek Dooley.[3] Five of those coaches also won conference championships: Zora G. Clevenger captured one as a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association, Neyland captured two as a member of the Southern Conference and Neyland, Wyatt, Majors, and Fulmer won a combined twelve as a member of the SEC.[4] During their tenures, Neyland and Fulmer each won national championships with the Volunteers.[4][5]

Neyland is the leader in total number of seasons coached and games won, with 173 victories during his 21 years with the program.[1] Barnhill has the highest winning percentage with .846.[1] James DePree has the lowest winning percentage with .306.[1] Of the 23 head coaches who have led the Volunteers, Neyland, Wyatt, Dickey, Majors, and Fulmer have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.[6][7][8][9]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships, and selected awards[A 5]
# Name Season(s)
[A 6]
GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL PT DC
[A 7]
CC NC Awards
1 Pierce, J. A.J. A. Pierce 1899–1900 14 9 4 1 .679 2 3 1 .417 0
2 Kelley, GeorgeGeorge Kelley 1901 8 3 3 2 .500 1 1 2 .500 0
3 Fisher, H. F.H. F. Fisher 1902–1903 17 10 7 0 .588 4 6 0 .400 0
4 Crawford, S. D.S. D. Crawford 1904 9 3 5 1 .389 1 4 0 .200 0
5 DePree, JamesJames DePree 1905–1906 18 4 11 3 .306 0 8 2 .100 0
6 Levene, GeorgeGeorge Levene 1907–1909 28 15 10 3 .589 7 9 1 .441 0
7 Stone, Andrew A.Andrew A. Stone 1910 9 3 5 1 .389 1 4 0 .200 0
8 Clevenger, Zora G.Zora G. Clevenger 1911–1915 43 26 15 2 .628 8 12 0 .400 0
9 Bender, John R.John R. Bender 1916,
1919–1920
27 18 5 4 .741 10 5 3 .639 0 0 0 0
10 Banks, M. B.M. B. Banks 1921–1925 45 27 15 3 .633 14 11 2 .556 0 0 0 0
11 Neyland, RobertRobert Neylanddagger 1926–1934,
1936–1940,
1946–1952
216 173 31 12 .829 103 17 10 .831 2 5 0 8 4 – 1938, 1940, 1950, 1951 AP SEC Coach of the Year (1951)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1936, 1938, 1950)[14]
12 Britton, W. H.W. H. Britton 1935 9 4 5 0 .444 2 3 0 .400 0 0 0 0 0
13 Barnhill, JohnJohn Barnhill 1941–1942,
1944–1945
39 32 5 2 .846 15 3 1 .816 1 1 0 0 0 SEC Coach of the Year (1944)[14]
14 Robinson, HarveyHarvey Robinson 1953–1954 21 10 10 1 .500 4 7 1 .375 0 0 0 0 0
15 Wyatt, BowdenBowden Wyattdagger 1955–1962 82 49 29 4 .622 29 23 4 .554 1 1 0 1 0 AFCA Coach of the Year (1956)[15]
AP SEC Coach of the Year (1956)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1956)[14]
16 McDonald, JimJim McDonald 1963 10 5 5 0 .500 3 5 0 .375 0 0 0 0 0
17 Dickey, DougDoug Dickeydagger 1964–1969 65 46 15 4 .738 23 10 4 .676 2 3 0 0 0 AP SEC Coach of the Year (1967)[14]
UPI SEC Coach of the Year (1967)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1965, 1967)[14]
18 Battle, BillBill Battle 1970–1976 83 59 22 2 .723 22 18 1 .549 4 1 0 0 0
19 Majors, JohnnyJohnny Majorsdagger 1977–1992
[A 8]
186 116 82 8 .645 57 40 3 .585 7 4 0 0 3 0 AP SEC Coach of the Year (1985)[14]
UPI SEC Coach of the Year (1985)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1985)[14]
20 Fulmer, PhillipPhillip Fulmerdagger 1992–2008
[A 8]
204 152 52 0 .745 98 34 0 .742 8 7 0 6 2 1 – 1998 AFCA Coach of the Year (1998)[15]
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year (1998)[17]
George Munger Award (1998)[18]
Sporting News College Football Coach of the Year (1998)[19]
AP SEC Coach of the Year (1998)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1998)[14]
21 Kiffin, LaneLane Kiffin 2009 13 7 6 .538 4 4 .500 0 1 0 0 0
22 Dooley, DerekDerek Dooley 2010–2012 36 15 21 .417 4 19 .174 0 1 0 0 0
Int Chaney, JimJim Chaney
[A 9]
2012 1 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 0 0 0 0
23 Jones, ButchButch Jones 2013–present 12 5 7 .417 2 6 .250 0 0 0 0 0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[10]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[11]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[12]
  5. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2012–13 college football season.
  6. ^ Tennessee did not field teams for the 1917 and 1918 seasons due to World War I and again for the 1943 season due to World War II.[1]
  7. ^ Divisional champions have advanced to the SEC Championship Game since the institution of divisional play beginning in the 1992 season. Since that time, Tennessee has competed as a member of the SEC East.[13]
  8. ^ a b Johnny Majors finished the 1992 season with a record of five wins and three losses. While Majors was recovering from heart surgery, Philip Fulmer served as interim head coach for the first three games of the season and for the 1993 Hall of Fame Bowl. Fulmer was then named head coach at the conclusion of the regular season following the resignation of Majors.[16]
  9. ^ Jim Chaney served as interim head coach for the final game of the 2012 season after Derek Dooley was fired as head coach on November 18, 2012.[20]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e f g 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, p. 162
  2. ^ "Butch Jones takes Tennessee job". ESPN.com. December 7, 2012. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  3. ^ 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, pp. 192–193
  4. ^ a b 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, pp. 165–173
  5. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (2010). 2010 NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA.org. pp. 68–77. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bob "The General" Neyland". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bowden Wyatt". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Hall of Famers: Doug Dickey". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Hall of Famers: Johnny Majors". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  10. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  11. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  12. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  13. ^ Harwell, Hoyt (November 30, 1990). "SEC sets division lineups". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 1C. Retrieved January 30, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, p. 132
  15. ^ a b "AFCA Coach of the Year Award – Past Winners". American Football Coaches Association. January 19, 2011. Retrieved March 7, 2010. 
  16. ^ 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, p. 172
  17. ^ "All-time Eddie Robinson Award Winners". Football Writers Association of America. Retrieved March 7, 2010. 
  18. ^ "The Joseph V. Paterno Award Winners". The Maxwell Football Club. Retrieved March 7, 2010. 
  19. ^ 2010 Tennessee Volunteers Football Guide, p. 131
  20. ^ "Tennessee dismisses Derek Dooley". ESPN.com. ESPN.com news services. November 18, 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2012.