List of Texas Tech Red Raiders head football coaches

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The first coach of the Red Raiders, known then as the Matadors, was Ewing Y. Freeland.

The Texas Tech Red Raiders football program is a college football team that represents Texas Tech University in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 14 head coaches, and one interim head coach, since it began play during the 1925 season.

Texas Tech (then known as Texas Technological College) was known as the "Matadors" from 1925 to 1936, a name suggested by the wife of Ewing Y. Freeland, the first football coach, to reflect the influence of the Spanish Renaissance architecture on campus.[1] In 1932, Texas Tech joined the Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The school's short-lived Matadors moniker was replaced officially in 1937 with "Red Raiders", the nickname the team has had ever since.[1] The same year, Pete Cawthon, Texas Tech's third head coach, led the team to their first conference championship and bowl game berth, a 7–6 loss to the West Virginia Mountaineers in the Sun Bowl. Texas Tech suffered four more bowl losses, under two head coaches, before their first postseason win in the 1952 Sun Bowl, under first-year head coach DeWitt Weaver.[2] Before withdrawing from the Border Conference in 1956, the Red Raiders won nine conference championships, the most held by a Border Conference member. Weaver and his predecessor Dell Morgan each won four conference championships, a record for a Texas Tech head coach.

In 1960, Texas Tech was admitted to the Southwest Conference. The Red Raiders won two conference championships in 1976 and 1994, under head coaches Steve Sloan and Spike Dykes respectively. Texas Tech became a charter member in the South Division of the Big 12 Conference in 1996 when the Southwest Conference disbanded. During his ninth season as head coach, Mike Leach led Texas Tech to the program's first division championship in 2008. After Leach was fired at the end of the 2009 season, Ruffin McNeill was named interim head coach for the Alamo Bowl. Tommy Tuberville coached the Red Raiders from 2010 to 2012, resigning after the conclusion of the regular season. The current head coach, Kliff Kingsbury, is a former quarterback with the team. He was hired on December 12, 2012.[3]

Key[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Statistics correct as of the end of the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season
# Name Season(s) GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL PT CCs DCs Notable awards
1 Freeland, Ewing Y.Ewing Y. Freeland 1925–1928 37 21 10 6 .649
2 Higginbotham, GradyGrady Higginbotham 1929 10 1 7 2 .200
3 Cawthon, PetePete Cawthon 1930–1940 114 76 32 6 .693 10 1 1 .875 0 2 0 1
4 Morgan, DellDell Morgan 1941–1950 107 55 49 3 .528 23 3 1 .870 0 3 0 4 Border Conference Coach of the Year (1949)[6]
5 Weaver, DeWittDeWitt Weaver 1951–1960 105 49 51 5 .490 20 6 3 .741 2 1 0 4 Border Conference Coach of the Year (1951, 1953)[7]
6 King, J. T.J. T. King 1961–1969 92 44 45 3 .495 27 35 1 .437 0 2 0 0 SWC Coach of the Year (1965)[8]
7 Carlen, JimJim Carlen 1970–1974 59 37 20 2 .644 20 15 0 .571 1 2 1 0 SWC Coach of the Year (1970, 1973)[9]
8 Sloan, SteveSteve Sloan 1975–1977 35 23 12 0 .657 15 8 0 .652 0 2 0 1 SWC Coach of the Year (1976)[10]
9 Dockery, RexRex Dockery 1977–1980 33 15 16 2 .485 10 13 1 .438 0 0 0 0 SWC Coach of the Year (1978)[11]
10 Moore, JerryJerry Moore 1981–1985 55 16 37 2 .309 9 29 2 .250 0 0 0 0
11 McWilliams, DavidDavid McWilliams 1986 11 7 4 0 .636 5 3 0 .625 0 0 0 0 SWC Coach of the Year (1986)[12]
12 Dykes, SpikeSpike Dykes 1986–1999 150 82 67 1 .550 57 40 1 .587 2 5 0 1 0 SWC Coach of the Year (1989, 1993, 1994)[13]
Big 12 Coach of the Year (1996)[14]
13 Leach, MikeMike Leach 2000–2009 127 84 43 .661 47 33 .588 5 4 0 1

Big 12 Coach of the Year (2008)
George Munger Award (2008)
Woody Hayes Award (2008)

Int McNeill, RuffinRuffin McNeill 2009 1 1 0 1.000 1 0
14 Tuberville, TommyTommy Tuberville 2010–2012 25 13 12 .520 5 12 .294 1 0 0 0
Int Thomsen, ChrisChris Thomsen 2012 1 1 0 1.000 1 0
15 Kingsbury, KliffKliff Kingsbury 2013–present 13 8 5 .615 4 5 .444 1 0 0 0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, not including interim head coaches. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int".
  2. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[4]
  3. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[5]
  4. ^ a b Texas Tech was not in an athletic conference from 1925 through 1931 and 1957 through 1959.
  5. ^ Texas Tech participated as a member of the South Division in the Big 12 Conference from 1996 through 2010.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Clark, Kyle; Siegrist, Nikki (2003-03-13). "Making Matadors: Spanish style architecture inspires Tech's first mascot". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved 2010-02-04. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Texas Tech Bowl History". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2010-01-30. 
  3. ^ "Kliff Kingsbury coming home to Texas Tech to be Red Raiders head coach". Yahoo! Sports. 2012-12-12. Retrieved 2012-12-12. 
  4. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (2006-08-25). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. Archived from the original on 2009-11-24. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  5. ^ Finder, Chuck (1987-09-06). "Big Plays Help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2009-10-22. Retrieved 2009-10-22. 
  6. ^ Rushing, Jane Gilmore; Kline A. Nall (1975). Evolution of a University: Texas Tech's first fifty years. Austin, Texas: Madrona Press. p. 128. ISBN 0-89052-017-8. 
  7. ^ Andrews, Ruth Horn (1956). The First Thirty Years: a History of Texas Technological College. Lubbock, Texas: The Texas Tech Press. p. 307. 
  8. ^ "Texas Tech 2010–11 Athletics Record Book". Texas Tech University. p. 10. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  9. ^ Zuvanich, Adam (2008-07-09). "Hall to enter Hall: Former QB among seven Tech honorees". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Archived from the original on 2010-12-19. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 
  10. ^ Traughbe, Bill (2006-09-20). "Steve Sloan Talks About His Career" (PDF). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 
  11. ^ Gulick, Joe (2008-09-17). "Dirk West: Coach hit it big". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Archived from the original on 2010-12-19. Retrieved 2010-12-19. 
  12. ^ Freeman, Denne H. (1987-10-31). "'Horns Concern Tech Players Not Departure of McWilliams". The Victoria Advocate. Associated Press. p. 3B. Retrieved 2010-12-19. 
  13. ^ "Dallas - Texas Tech's bid for its first Cotton Bowl Victory". San Antonio Express-News (Hearst Corporation). Associated Press. 1994-12-04. "Texas Tech's bid for its first Cotton Bowl victory on Jan. 2 will be led by none other than The Associated Press Southwest Conference Coach of the Year. Spike Dykes, 56, received the award for the second consecutive year." 
  14. ^ "Spike Dykes Endowment Kickoff Luncheon". Texas Tech University. Retrieved 2009-02-03.