List of U.S. states by Gini coefficient

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The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of variance. It is often applied to measure inequality of incomes in a particular area.

A score of "0" on the Gini coefficient represents complete equality, i.e., every person has the same income. A score of 1 would represent complete inequality, i.e., where one person has all the income and others have none.

The information was tabulated in 2010 from data from the American Community Survey conducted by the US Census Bureau. Utah shows the flattest income distribution while the District of Columbia and New York State have the largest income disparities between wage earners in all income categories.[1]

U.S. income inequality was at its highest level since the United States Census Bureau began tracking household income in 1967. The U.S. also has the greatest disparity among Western industrialized nations.[1]

List of U.S. states by Gini coefficient of income inequality[edit]

The list goes from lowest Gini coefficient to the highest. The Gini index for the United States as a whole is 0.469.

A Map of the US by Gini coefficient
2010
Rank
State Gini
Coefficient
1 Utah 0.419
2 Alaska 0.422
3 Wyoming 0.423
4 New Hampshire 0.425
5 Iowa 0.427
6 Wisconsin 0.430
7 Nebraska 0.432
8 Hawaii 0.433
8 Idaho 0.433
8 North Dakota 0.433
11 Montana 0.435
12 Maine 0.437
13 Delaware 0.440
13 Indiana 0.440
13 Minnesota 0.440
16 Washington 0.441
17 South Dakota 0.442
18 Maryland 0.443
19 Vermont 0.444
20 Kansas 0.445
21 Nevada 0.448
22 Oregon 0.449
23 Michigan 0.451
23 West Virginia 0.451
25 Ohio 0.452
26 Oklahoma 0.454
27 Arizona 0.455
27 Missouri 0.455
29 Colorado 0.457
30 Arkansas 0.458
31 Virginia 0.459
32 Pennsylvania 0.461
32 South Carolina 0.461
34 New Jersey 0.464
34 New Mexico 0.464
34 North Carolina 0.464
37 Illinois 0.465
38 Kentucky 0.466
39 Rhode Island 0.467
40 Georgia 0.468
40 Mississippi 0.468
40 Tennessee 0.468
43 Texas 0.469
44 California 0.471
45 Alabama 0.472
46 Florida 0.474
47 Louisiana 0.475
47 Massachusetts 0.475
49 Connecticut 0.486
50 New York 0.499
51 District of Columbia 0.532

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Census data: Weddings in 2009 at record low level". Associated Press. Retrieved 2011-02-08. A different measure, the international Gini index, found U.S. income inequality at its highest level since the Census Bureau began tracking household income in 1967. The U.S. also has the greatest disparity among Western industrialized nations. ... Three states - New York, Connecticut and Texas - and the District of Columbia had the largest gaps in rich and poor, disparities that exceeded the national average. Similar income gaps were evident in large cities such as New York, Miami, Los Angeles, Boston and Atlanta, home to both highly paid financial and high-tech jobs as well as clusters of poorer immigrant and minority residents. On the other end of the scale, Alaska, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho and Hawaii had the smallest income gaps. 

References[edit]

  • [1] - Gini index by state for households
  • [2] - Gini index for US as tabulated in the 2010 American Community Survey
  • U.S. Census Bureau - Gini index as tabulated in the 2009 American Community Survey

External links[edit]