List of U.S. states by population density

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Map of states showing population density (2000)
New Jersey is the most densely populated state. It is also the second wealthiest.
Despite being home to the most populous city in the country, New York State ranks 7th in overall density.
Washington State is ranked 25th in density, but is still above the national average.
Despite a fairly average population density Vermont has one of the smallest populations due to its small overall area.
Idaho's population has increased rapidly in recent decades, but its population density, relative to other states, is low.
About half of the population of Alaska lives in the Anchorage metropolitan area.
Puerto Rico ranks third among the most densely populated areas in the U.S. (behind DC and NJ)

This article includes a sortable table of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and territories ordered by population density. Population density is calculated as resident population divided by total land area. Resident population is from the United States Census Bureau estimates for July 1, 2011,[1] and total land area is also from the Census Bureau.[2]

The population density of the United States is relatively low compared to many other developed countries due to its size and the advent of modern transportation during its settlement. For example, the population density of the U.S. is one twelfth that of the Netherlands, and one fifteenth that of South Korea (as of 2010).[3]

U.S. states and territories by population density

Rank State/Territory Pop.
density
/sqmi
Pop.
density
/sqkm
 District of Columbia[4] 10,122.8 3,908.4
1  New Jersey 1,199.5 463.1
 Puerto Rico 1,082.6 418.0
2  Rhode Island 1,016.9 392.6
 U.S. Virgin Islands 916.9 354.0
 American Samoa 914.0 352.9
3  Massachusetts 844.5 326.1
 Guam 830.0 320.5
4  Connecticut 739.5 285.5
5  Maryland 600.4 231.8
6  Delaware 465.5 179.7
7  New York 413.0 159.5
8  Florida 355.4 137.2
9  Pennsylvania 285.5 110.2
10  Ohio 282.5 109.1
11  California 242.0 93.4
12  Illinois 231.8 89.5
13  Hawaii 214.1 82.7
14  Virginia 205.0 79.2
15  North Carolina 198.6 76.7
16  Indiana 182.5 70.5
17  Michigan 174.8 67.5
18  Georgia 170.7 65.9
19  South Carolina 155.7 60.1
20  Tennessee 155.3 60.0
21  New Hampshire 147.2 56.8
22  Kentucky 110.7 42.7
23  Wisconsin 105.2 40.6
24  Louisiana 105.9 40.9
25  Washington 102.6 39.6
26  Texas 98.1 37.9
27  Alabama 94.7 36.6
 United States* 88.1 34.0
28  Missouri 87.3 33.7
29  West Virginia 77.1 29.8
30  Vermont 67.7 26.1
31  Minnesota 67.1 25.9
 Northern Mariana Islands 63.8 24.6
32  Mississippi 63.5 24.5
33  Arizona 57.1 22.0
34  Arkansas 56.4 21.8
35  Oklahoma 55.2 21.3
36  Iowa 54.8 21.2
37  Colorado 49.3 19.0
38  Maine 43.0 16.6
39  Oregon 40.3 15.6
40  Kansas 35.1 13.6
41  Utah 34.3 13.2
42  Nevada 24.8 9.6
43  Nebraska 24.0 9.3
44  Idaho 19.2 7.4
45  New Mexico 17.2 6.6
46  South Dakota 10.9 4.2
47  North Dakota 9.9 3.8
48  Montana 6.9 2.7
49  Wyoming 5.9 2.3
50  Alaska 1.3 0.5

*Does not include territories, but does include District of Columbia.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2011" (CSV). 2011 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. December 2011. Retrieved December 21, 2011. 
  2. ^ "2010 Census State Area Measurements and Internal Point Coordinates". 2010 United States Census. United States Census Bureau. February 11, 2011. Retrieved December 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ United Nations World Population Prospects
  4. ^ The District of Columbia is not a U.S. state, but is used in the calculation of the total average U.S. population density.

External links[edit]