List of UCLA Bruins men's basketball head coaches

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John Wooden led the team to 10 of its 11 national titles.
Former coach Ben Howland compiled the second most victories in school history.

The men's college basketball program of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) was founded in 1920 and is known competitively as the UCLA Bruins. The team has had 13 head coaches in its history, and they have won 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men's Division I Basketball Championships, the most of any school.[1] John Wooden won 10 national championships between 1964 and 1975, and Jim Harrick won the other in 1995. The New York Times wrote that Wooden "made UCLA. the most successful team in college basketball."[2] After Wooden retired, the four coaches that succeeded him resigned, and the following three—Harrick included—were fired. The average tenure of those coaches after Wooden was four years.[3][note 1] Ben Howland, led the Bruins to three consecutive Final Four appearances from 2006 to 2008.[4]

Years Duration of head coaching career at UCLA
Won Number of games won at UCLA
Lost Number of games lost at UCLA
% Percentage of games won at UCLA
* Elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a coach
Statistics updated through 2012–13 season
Head Coach Years Won Lost % Ref
Fred Cozens 1919–1921 20 4 .833 [5]
Caddy Works 1921–1939 173 159 .521
Wilbur Johns 1939–1948 93 120 .437
John Wooden* 1948–1975 620 147 .808
Gene Bartow 1975–1977 52 9 .852
Gary Cunningham 1977–1979 50 8 .862
Larry Brown* 1979–1981 42 17 .712
Larry Farmer 1981–1984 61 23 .726
Walt Hazzard 1984–1988 77 47 .621
Jim Harrick 1988–1996 192 62 .756
Steve Lavin 1996–2003 145 78 .650
Ben Howland 2003–2013 233 107 .685 [6]
Steve Alford 2013–current 44 19

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ There were 28 seasons from 1975–76 to 2002–03 and 7 coaches, an average of 4 years. The Yahoo article said 3.9.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 10 Colleges to Produce NBA Pros". RealClearSports. June 21, 2011. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. 
  2. ^ Litsky, Frank (March 18, 2003). "Formality Is Reality As U.C.L.A. Fires Lavin". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ Wetzel, Dan (March 29, 2006). "Westwood's new look". yahoo.com (Yahoo! Sports). Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. 
  4. ^ Dwyre, Bill (February 11, 2011). "Ben Howland keeps cool on the UCLA basketball hot seat". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 29, 2011. 
  5. ^ "2011–12 UCLA Men's Basketball Media Guide". UCLA Athletic Department. 2011. p. 121. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 5, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Ben Howland coaching record". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 29, 2012.