List of UEFA Women's Cup and Women's Champions League winners

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The players of Turbine Potsdam celebrate their victory in 2005.

The UEFA Women's Champions League is a women's association football competition established in 2001.[1] It is the only international competition for European women's football clubs. The competition is open to the league champions of all UEFA member associations who run such championships; 46 of UEFA's 53 member associations have entered. The top eight associations may enter two teams, and the title holder is also entitled to an additional spot if they do not qualify through their domestic league. The first final was held in a single match final. Between 2003 and 2009, the final was contested in two legs, one at each participating club's home, but the single match was reinstated in 2010. The competition was known as UEFA Women's Cup until 2009.

German side Frankfurt holds the record with three titles while Swedish side Umeå and French team Lyon are the only teams that have retained the title. Umeå also holds the distinction of losing the final the most times with three final losses. Germany is the most successful member association with eight titles. Wolfsburg won the most recent tournament, in 2014, after beating Tyresö 4–3.[2]

Winners[edit]

Key[edit]

Match decided by a penalty shoot-out after extra time
Bold – Indicates the winner in two-legged finals

Single match final[edit]

Season Country Winner Score Runners-up Country Venue Location Notes
2001–02  GER Frankfurt 2–0 Umeå  SWE Waldstadion Frankfurt, Germany [3]

Two-legged finals[edit]

Season Country Home team Score Away team Country Venue Location Notes
2002–03  SWE Umeå 4–1 Fortuna Hjørring  DEN Gammliavallen Umeå, Sweden [4]
 DEN Fortuna Hjørring 0–3 Umeå  SWE Hjørring Stadium Hjørring, Denmark
Umeå won 7–1 on aggregate
2003–04  SWE Umeå 3–0 Frankfurt  GER Råsunda Stadium Stockholm, Sweden [5]
 GER Frankfurt 0–5 Umeå  SWE Bornheimer Hang Frankfurt, Germany
Umeå won 8–0 on aggregate
2004–05  SWE Djurgården/Älvsjö 0–2 Turbine Potsdam  GER Olympic Stadium Stockholm, Sweden [6]
 GER Turbine Potsdam 3–1 Djurgården/Älvsjö  SWE Karl-Liebknecht-Stadion Potsdam, Germany
Turbine Potsdam won 5–1 on aggregate
2005–06  GER Turbine Potsdam 0–4 Frankfurt  GER Karl-Liebknecht-Stadion Potsdam, Germany [7]
 GER Frankfurt 3–2 Turbine Potsdam  GER Bornheimer Hang Frankfurt, Germany
Frankfurt won 7–2 on aggregate
2006–07  SWE Umeå 0–1 Arsenal  ENG Gammliavallen Umeå, Sweden [8]
 ENG Arsenal 0–0 Umeå  SWE Meadow Park Borehamwood, England
Arsenal won 1–0 on aggregate
2007–08  SWE Umeå 1–1 Frankfurt  GER Gammliavallen Umeå, Sweden [9]
 GER Frankfurt 3–2 Umeå  SWE UEFA Women's Cup Stadium Frankfurt, Germany
Frankfurt won 4–3 on aggregate
2008–09  RUS Zvezda Perm 0–6 Duisburg  GER Central Stadium Kazan, Russia [10]
 GER Duisburg 1–1 Zvezda Perm  RUS MSV-Arena Duisburg, Germany
Duisburg won 7–1 on aggregate

Single match finals[edit]

Season Country Winner Score Runners-up Country Venue Location Notes
2009–10  GER Turbine Potsdam 0–0* Lyon  FRA Coliseum Alfonso Pérez Getafe, Spain [n 1]
2010–11  FRA Lyon 2–0 Turbine Potsdam  GER Craven Cottage London, England [12]
2011–12  FRA Lyon 2–0 Frankfurt  GER Olympiastadion Munich, Germany [13]
2012–13  GER Wolfsburg 1–0 Lyon  FRA Stamford Bridge London, United Kingdom [14]
2013–14  SWE Tyresö 3–4 Wolfsburg  GER Estádio do Restelo Lisbon, Portugal [2]

Performances[edit]

By teams[edit]

Team Winners Runners-up Years won Years runner-up
Germany Frankfurt 3 2 2002, 2006, 2008 2004, 2012
Sweden Umeå 2 3 2003, 2004 2002, 2007, 2008
Germany Turbine Potsdam 2 2 2005, 2010 2006, 2011
France Lyon 2 2 2011, 2012 2010, 2013
Germany Wolfsburg 2 0 2013, 2014
England Arsenal 1 0 2007
Germany Duisburg 1 0 2009
Sweden Djurgården/Älvsjö 0 1 2005
Denmark Fortuna Hjørring 0 1 2003
Russia Zvezda Perm 0 1 2009
Sweden Tyresö 0 1 2014

By countries[edit]

Nation Winners Runners-up
 Germany 8 4
 Sweden 2 5
 France 2 2
 England 1 0
 Denmark 0 1
 Russia 0 1

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Turbine Potsdam won 7–6 in a penalty shoot-out.[11]

References[edit]

General[edit]

Specific[edit]

  1. ^ "History". UEFA. 2005-07-13. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  2. ^ a b "Müller the hero again as Wolfsburg win classic final". UEFA (Union of European Football Associations). 22 May 2014. Retrieved 25 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Frankfurt claim maiden crown". UEFA. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  4. ^ "Umeå the pride of Europe". UEFA. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  5. ^ "Marta magic earns Umeå glory". UEFA. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  6. ^ "Potsdam restore German pride". UEFA. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  7. ^ "Frankfurt rise to the top once more". UEFA. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  8. ^ "Spirited Arsenal outgun rivals". UEFA. 2007-05-20. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  9. ^ "Frankfurt make history". UEFA. 2008-06-03. Retrieved 2008-10-25. 
  10. ^ "Duisburg lift last UEFA Women's Cup". UEFA. 2009-05-22. Retrieved 2009-09-27. 
  11. ^ "Potsdam hold nerve to claim European crown". UEFA. 2010-05-20. Retrieved 2010-05-26. 
  12. ^ "Classy Lyon take title from Potsdam". UEFA. 2011-05-28. Retrieved 2011-05-26. 
  13. ^ "Lyon wins title". UEFA. 2012-05-28. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  14. ^ "UEFA Women's Champions League history". UEFA. 2014. Retrieved 2014-04-27. 

External links[edit]