List of United States political families (D)

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The following is an alphabetical list of political families in the United States whose last name begins with D.

Contents

The D'Alesandros and Pelosis[edit]

The Dales[edit]

  • George N. Dale, Lieutenant Governor of Vermont 1870–1872. Father of Porter H. Dale.[5]
    • Porter H. Dale (1867–1933), Vermont State Senator 1910–1912, U.S. Representative from Vermont 1915–1923, U.S. Senator from Vermont 1923–1933. Son of George N. Dale.[6]

The Daleys[edit]

Main article: Daley family

Two members of the Daley family served as Mayor of Chicago, between them ruling the city for more than a third of a century.

The Dallases, Pells, and Baches[edit]

  • Alexander J. Dallas (1759–1817), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1814–1816. Father of George M. Dallas.[11]
    • George M. Dallas (1792–1864), Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1828–1829; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1831–1833; Attorney General of Pennsylvania 1833–1835; Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Russia 1835–1837; Vice President of the United States 1845–1849; Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United Kingdom 1856–1861. Son of Alexander J. Dallas and uncle of Alexander Dallas Bache.[12]

NOTE: Robert J. Walker was also grandson-in-law of Congressional Delegate Benjamin Franklin.[17] Claiborne Pell is also son of U.S. Representative Herbert C. Pell, Jr.,[18] great-great grandson of U.S. Representative John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne,[19] and great-great grandnephew of William C.C. Claiborne[20] and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne.[21]

The Daltons[edit]

  • S.P. Dalton (1892–1965), Prosecuting Attorney of Cape Girardeau County, Missouri 1927–1928 1931–1934; Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court 1950–1956 1958–1965; Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court 1956–1958. Brother of John M. Dalton.[22]
  • John M. Dalton (1900–1972), Attorney General of Missouri 1953–1961, Governor of Missouri 1961–1965. Brother of S.P. Dalton.[23]

The Danahers[edit]

  • John A. Danaher (1899–1990), Connecticut Secretary of State 1933–1935, U.S. Senator from Connecticut 1939–1945, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1944, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1953–1980. Brother of Francis R. Danaher.[24]
  • Francis R. Danaher, Mayor of Meriden, Connecticut 1938–1948. Brother of John A. Danaher.[25]
    • John A. Danaher III, U.S. Attorney of Connecticut 2001–2002, Connecticut Commissioner of Public Safety 2007–present. Grandson of John A. Danaher.[26]

The Danforths and Rhoadses[edit]

  • Henry Rhoads (1739–1814), member of the Kentucky Legislature 1788–1796. Granduncle of John P. Rhoads.[27]
    • John P. Rhoads (1818–1866), California Assemblyman 1863–1865. Grandnephew of Henry Rhoads.[28]
      • John C. Danforth (1936–), Attorney General of Missouri 1969–1976, candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate from Missouri 1970, U.S. Senator from Missouri 1976–1995, U.S. Ambassador the United Nations 2004–2005. Descendant of Henry Rhoads.[29]

The Daniels and Houstons[edit]

  • Samuel Houston (1793–1863), U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1923–1927, Governor of Tennessee 1927–1929, President of the Republic of Texas 1836–1838 1841–1844, Texas Republic Representative 1838, U.S. Senator from Texas 1846–1859, Governor of Texas 1859–1861. Great-great-grandfather-in-law of Price Daniel.[30]
    • Price Daniel (1910–1988), Texas State Representative 1939–1945, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940 1948 1964, Attorney General of Texas 1947–1953, U.S. Senator from Texas 1953–1957, Governor of Texas 1957–1963, Justice of the Texas Supreme Court. Great-great-grandson-in-law of Samuel Houston.[31]
      • Price Daniel, Jr. (1941–1981), Texas State Representative 1969–1978, delegate to the Texas Constitutional Convention 1974, candidate for Democratic nomination for Attorney General of Texas 1978. Son of Price Daniel.[32]

NOTE: Samuel Houston was also father of U.S. Senator Andrew Jackson Houston[33] and cousin of U.S. Representative David Hubbard.[34] Price Daniel was also brother of Guam Governor William Daniel.[35]

The Daniels and Worths[edit]

  • Jonathan Worth (1802–1869), North Carolina State Representative 1831–1835, North Carolina State Senator, candidate for U.S. Representative from North Carolina, North Carolina State Treasurer 1863–1865, Governor of North Carolina 1865–1868. Brother of John M. Worth.
  • John M. Worth (1810–1900), North Carolina State Senator 1870–1876, North Carolina Treasurer 1876–1885. Brother of Jonathan Worth.[36]

The Danners[edit]

  • Patsy A. Danner (1934–), Missouri State Senator 1983–1993, U.S. Representative from Missouri 1993–2001. Mother of Steve Danner.[39]
    • Steve Danner, Missouri State Senator, candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 2000. Son of Patsy A. Danner.

The Darlingtons and Butlers[edit]

  • Edward Darlington (1755–1825), Pennsylvania State Representative 1802–1804 1811–1813. Father of William Darlington.[40]
    • William Darlington (1782–1863), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1815–1817 1819–1823. Son of Edward Darlington.[41]
    • Isaac Darlington (1781–1839), Pennsylvania State Representative 1807–1809, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1817–1819, District Judge in Pennsylvania 1821–1839. Nephew of Edward Darlington.[42]
    • Edward Darlington (1795–1884), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1833–1839, District Attorney of Delaware County, Pennsylvania 1851–1854. Nephew of Edward Darlington.[43]
    • William Darlington (1804–1879), delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention 1837 1879. Nephew of Edward Darlington.[44]
    • James B. Roberts (1784–1822), Pennsylvania State Representative 1814–1815. Nephew by marriage of Edward Darlington.[45]
      • Smedley Darlington (1827–1899), delegate to the Liberal Republican Party National Convention 1872, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1896, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1887–1891. Grandnephew of Edward Darlington.[46]
        • Thomas S. Butler (1855–1928), Pennsylvania State Court Judge 1888, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1897–1928. Son-in-law of Smedley Darlington.[47]
          • Smedley Butler (1881–1940), candidate for U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania 1932. Son of Thomas S. Butler.[48]

NOTE: Thomas S. Butler was also son of Pennsylvania Treasurer Samuel Butler[49] and nephew of U.S. District Court Judge William Butler.[50]

The Davenports[edit]

  • John Davenport (1752–1830), U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1799–1817. Brother of James Davenport.[51]
  • James Davenport (1758–1797), Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in Connecticut, Connecticut State Representative, Connecticut State Senator, Judge of the Fairfield County, Connecticut Court 1792–1796; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1796–1797. Brother of John Davenport.[52]

The Davises[edit]

  • John J. Davis (1835–1916), Virginia House Delegate 1861, West Virginia House Delegate 1870, U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1871–1875, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876. Father of John W. Davis.[53]
    • John W. Davis (1873–1955), West Virginia House Delegate 1899, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904 1928 1932, U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1911–1913, Solicitor General of the United States 1913–1918, U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain 1918–1921, candidate for Democratic nomination for President of the United States 1920, candidate for President of the United States 1924. Son of John J. Davis.[54]

NOTE: John W. Davis was also first cousin of U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance.[55]

The Davises of Kentucky[edit]

  • Amos Davis (1794–1835), Sheriff of Montgomery County, Kentucky; Kentucky State Representative 1819 1825 1827–1828; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1826 1830; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1833–1835. Brother of Garrett Davis.[56]
  • Garrett Davis (1801–1872), Kentucky State Representative 1833–1835, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1839–1847, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1861–1872. Brother of Amos Davis.[57]

The Davises of Minnesota and Wisconsin[edit]

  • Horatio N. Davis, Wisconsin State Senator. Father of Cushman Kellogg Davis.[58]
    • Cushman Kellogg Davis (1838–1900), Minnesota State Representative 1867, U.S. Attorney of Minnesota 1868–1873, Governor of Minnesota 1874–1876, U.S. Senator from Minnesota 1887–1900, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1900. Son of Horatio N. Davis.[59]

The Davises of Nebraska and Virginia[edit]

  • Clarence A. Davis, Attorney General of Nebraska 1919–1923, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1928 1932. Grandfather of Thomas M. Davis.[60]

The Davises of Wisconsin[edit]

The Davises and Elkinses[edit]

  • Henry G. Davis (1823–1916), West Virginia House Delegate, West Virginia State Senator 1868 1870, U.S. Senator from West Virginia 1871–1883, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1904. Brother of Thomas Beall Davis.[62]
  • Thomas Beall Davis (1828–1911), West Virginia Democratic Executive Committeeman 1876–1907, West Virginia House Delegate 1899–1900, U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1905–1907. Brother of Henry G. Davis.[63]
    • Stephen B. Elkins (1841–1911), New Mexico Territory Representative 1864–1865, Attorney General of New Mexico Territory 1867, U.S. District Attorney of New Mexico Territory 1867–1870, U.S. Congressional Delegate from New Mexico Territory 1873–1877, U.S. Secretary of War 1891–1893, U.S. Senator from West Virginia 1895–1911. Son-in-law of Henry G. Davis.[64]
      • Davis Elkins (1876–1959), U.S. Senator from West Virginia 1911 1919–1925, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1916. Son of Stephen B. Elkins.[65]

The Davises and Lodges[edit]

The Davis family is related by marriage to The Lodges and The Cabots

  • John Davis (1787–1854), congressman from Massachusetts 1825 to 1834, Governor of Massachusetts 1834 to 1835; 1841 to 1843, senator from Massachusetts 1835 to 1841; 1845 to 1853.[66]
  • George Bancroft (1800–1891), United States Secretary of the Navy 1845 to 1846; U.S. Minister to the United Kingdom 1846 to 1849; U.S. Minister to Berlin 1849 to 1867. Brother-in-law of John Davis[67]
    • John Chandler Bancroft Davis (1822–1907), Assistant US Secretary of State 1869 to 1871; 1873 to 1874; 1881 to 1882, US Ambassador to Germany 1874 to 1877, United States Supreme Court Reporter of Decisions 1883 to 1902.[68]
    • Horace Davis (1831–1916), congressman from California 1877 to 1881.
        • Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (1902–1985), U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1937–1944 and 1947–1953; Ambassador to the UN, 1953–1960; Republican nominee for Vice President, 1960; Ambassador to Vietnam, 1963–1964 and 1965–1967; Ambassador to Germany, 1968–1969; candidate for the Republican nomination for President in 1964; great-great-grandson of John Davis and brother of John Davis Lodge.[69]
        • John Davis Lodge (1903–1985), 1933–1940; U.S. Representative from Connecticut, 1947–1951; governor of Connecticut, 1951–1955; U.S Ambassador to Spain, 1955–1961; Ambassador to Argentina, 1969–1973; Ambassador to Switzerland, 1983–1985; great-great-grandson of John Davis and brother of Henry Cabot Lodge Jr.[70]
          • George C. Lodge (1927–), candidate for U.S. Senate from Massachusetts 1962, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1964. Son of Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.[71]

NOTE: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and John Davis Lodge were also great-great-great-grandsons of U.S. Senator George Cabot,[72] great-great-grandsons of U.S. Senator Elijah Hunt Mills,[73] great-grandsons of U.S. Secretary of State Frederick T. Frelinghuysen,[74] grandsons of U.S. Senator Henry Cabot Lodge,[75] nephews by marriage of U.S. Representative Augustus P. Gardner,[76] and first cousins once removed of Connecticut State Representative William A.G. Minot.[77] Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. was also great-great-grandson-in-law of U.S. Senator Jonathan Mason[78] and brother-in-law of New Jersey Treasurer Archibald S. Alexander.[79] John Davis Lodge was also brother-in-law of U.S. Consul General D. Chadwick Braggiotti.[80]

The Davises and Roots[edit]

  • Daniel Davis (1768–1847), Connecticut State Representative 1811–1812. Uncle of Noah Davis.
    • Noah Davis (1818–1902), Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1857–1868 1873–1887, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860, U.S. Representative from New York 1869–1870, U.S. Attorney in New York 1870–1872. Nephew of Daniel Davis.
    • Joseph P. Root (1826–1885), Connecticut State Representative 1855, Kansas Territory Councilman 1857, Lieutenant Governor of Kansas 1861–1863, U.S. Minister to Chile 1870–1873, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1884. First cousin once removed of Daniel Davis.[81]

The Davises and Tredwells[edit]

  • Thomas Tredwell (1743–1831), New York Colony Councilman 1774–1775, delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention 1776 1777 1801, New York Assemblyman 1777–1783, Probate Court Judge in New York 1778–1787, New York State Senator 1786–1789 1803–1807, U.S. Representative from New York 1791–1795. Grandfather of Thomas Treadwell Davis.[82]

The Daweses[edit]

The Dawsons[edit]

The Dawsons, Johnson, and Wickliffes[edit]

  • John Bennett Dawson (1798–1845), member of the Louisiana Legislature, U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1841–1845. Brother-in-law of Isaac Johnson.
  • Isaac Johnson (1803–1853), Louisiana State Representative, Louisiana Secretary of State, Governor of Louisiana 1846–1850, Attorney General of Louisiana. Brother-in-law of John Bennett Dawson.
    • Robert C. Wickliffe (1819–1895), Louisiana State Senator, Governor of Louisiana 1856–1860, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876. Son-in-law of John Bennett Dawson.

NOTE: Robert C. Wickliffe was also son of U.S. Postmaster General Charles A. Wickliffe[90] and uncle of U.S. Senator J.C.W. Beckham.[91]

The Days[edit]

  • Luther T. Day (1813–1885), Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court 1865–1875. Father of William Rufus Day.[92]
    • William Rufus Day (1849–1923), Common Pleas Court Judge in Ohio 1886–1890, U.S. Secretary of State 1898, Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals 1899–1903, Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1903–1922. Son of Luther T. Day.[93]
      • William Louis Day (1876–1936), U.S. Attorney in Ohio 1908–1911, U.S. District Judge in Ohio 1911–1914. Son of William Rufus Day.[94]
      • Stephen A. Day (1882–1950), candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 1938, U.S. Representative from Illinois 1941–1944. Son of William Rufus Day.[95]

The Daytons[edit]

  • William L. Dayton (1807–1864), New Jersey Councilman 1837–1838, Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court 1838–1841, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1842–1851, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1856, Attorney General of New Jersey 1857–1861, U.S. Minister to France 1861–1864. Father of William Lewis Dayton, Jr.[96]
    • William Lewis Dayton, Jr., U.S. Minister to Netherlands 1882–1885. Son of William L. Dayton.[97]

NOTE: William L. Dayton was also distantly related to Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Jonathan Dayton.[98]

The Daytons of New Jersey[edit]

  • Elias Dayton (1737–1807), Delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey 1778, New Jersey Assemblyman 1791–1792 1794–1796, Mayor of Elizabethtown, New Jersey 1796–1805. Father of Jonathan Dayton.[99]
    • Jonathan Dayton (1760–1824), New Jersey Assemblyman 1786–1787 1790 1814–1815, Delegate to the Constitutional Convention from New Jersey 1787–1788, New Jersey Councilman 1790, U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1791–1799, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives 1795–1797 1797–1799, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1799–1805. Son of Elias Dayton.[100]
      • William L. Dayton (1807–1864), New Jersey State Senator 1837, Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court 1838, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1842–1851, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1856, Attorney General of New Jersey 1857–1861, U.S. Minister to France 1861–1864. Distant relative of Jonathan Dayton.[96]
        • William L. Dayton (1839–1897), U.S. Minister to the Netherlands 1882–1885. Son of William L. Dayton.[97]

The Dearborns[edit]

  • Henry Dearborn (1751–1829), U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1793–1797, U.S. Secretary of War 1801–1809, Collector of the Port of Boston, Massachusetts 1809–1812; U.S. Minister to Portugal 1822–1824. Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn.[101]
    • Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783–1851), Collector of the Port of Boston, Massachusetts 1812–1829; delegate to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention 1820; Massachusetts State Representative 1829; Massachusetts State Senator 1830; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1831–1833; Mayor of Roxbury, Massachusetts 1847–1851. Son of Henry Dearborn.[102]

The DeConcinis[edit]

The Deens[edit]

  • Jesse C. Deen, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives 1972-1988. Father of Larry Deen.[105]
  • Larry Deen, sheriff of Bossier Parish, Louisiana 1988-2012. Son of Jesse C. Deen.[106]

The Defrees and Frazers[edit]

  • John D. Defrees (1810–1882), Indiana State Representative 1840–1842, Indiana State Senator 1842–1845, Chairman of the Indiana Republican Party 1856–1860, Republican National Committeeman 1866–1868. Brother of Joseph H. Defrees.[107]
  • Joseph H. Defrees (1812–1885), Sheriff of Elkhart County, Indiana 1835–1840; Indiana State Representative; Indiana State Senator 1850–1854; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1865–1867. Brother of John D. Defrees.[108]
  • James Somerville Frazer (1824–1893), Indiana State Representative 1847–1849 1855, Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court 1865–1871, Indiana State Court Judge 1889–1890. Brother-in-law of John D. Defrees and Joseph H. Defrees.
    • William Frazer, Indiana State Representative 1881–1883. Son of James Somerville Frazer.[109]

The deGravelles[edit]

The Delavans and Depews[edit]

  • Charles H. Delavan (1810–1892), U.S. Consul in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 1849–1850. Cousin of Chauncey M. Depew.[111]
    • Chauncey M. Depew (1834–1928), New York Assemblyman 1862–1863, New York Secretary of States 1864–1865, Clerk of Westchester County, New York 1867; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1862 1892 1896 1900 1904 1908 1912 1916 1920 1924; candidate for New York Secretary of State 1872; candidate for the Republican nomination for President of the United States 1888; U.S. Senator from New York 1899–1911. Cousin of Charles H. Delavan.[112]

The Dellets, Gibbons, and Torreys[edit]

  • James Dellet (1788–1848), Alabama State Representative, candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 1833, U.S. Representative from Alabama 1839–1841 1843–1845. Father-in-law of Lyman Gibbons.[113]
    • Lyman Gibbons (1808–1879), Circuit Court Judge in Alabama 1851–1852, Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court 1852–1854. Son-in-law of James Dellet.[114]
      • Charles John Torrey (1850–1917), Alabama State Representative. Son-in-law of Lyman Gibbons.[115]

NOTE: Charles John Torrey was also son of Alabama legislator Rufus Campbell Torrey,[116] brother-in-law of Mobile, Alabama Mayor Harry Pillans, and cousin by marriage of Alabama State Representative Harry Theophilus Toulmin.

The Demings and Hawthornes[edit]

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864), U.S. Consul in Liverpool, England 1853–1857. Great-grandfather of Olcott Deming.[117]
    • Olcott Deming (1909–2007), U.S. Ambassador to Uganda 1963–1966. Great-grandson of Nathaniel Hawthorne.[118]
      • Rust M. Deming (1942–), acting U.S. Ambassador to Japan 1996–1997, U.S. Ambassador to Tunisia 2001–2003. Son of Olcott Deming.[119]

The Denbys[edit]

  • Graham N. Fitch (1809–1892), Indiana State Representative 1836 1839, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1849–1853, U.S. Senator from Indiana 1857–1861. Father-in-law of Charles Harvey Denby.[120]

NOTE: Graham N. Fitch was also brother-in-law of Michigan State Senator Henry J. Alvord.[124]

The Denisons[edit]

The Denissens[edit]

The Dennis and Whites[edit]

  • John Dennis (1771–1806), Maryland House Delegate, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1797–1805. Father of John Dennis.[128]
    • John Dennis (1807–1859), Maryland House Delegate, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1837–1841, delegate to the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1850. Son of John Dennis.[129]
    • Littleton Purnell Dennis (1786–1834), Maryland House Delegate 1815–1816 1819–1827, Maryland Executive Councilman 1829, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1833–1834. Nephew of John Dennis.[130]
      • Edward White, Maryland House Delegate 1880 1886. Great-great-great-grandson of John Dennis.[131]
      • King V. White, Orphan's Court Judge in Maryland, Maryland House Delegate 1882. Great-great-great-grandson of John Dennis.[132]
        • John Edward White, Maryland House Delegate 1898. Son of Edward White.[133]
        • A. Percy White, Maryland House Delegate 1927–1930. Son of King V. White.[134]
        • Wallace H. White, Maryland State Senator 1947–1950. Son of King V. White.[135]
          • E. Homer White, Jr. (1911–1998), Maryland House Delegate 1947–1969, Maryland State Senator 1975–1978. Nephew of A. Percy White and Wallace H. White.[136]

The Dennisons[edit]

The Dennys[edit]

  • Ebenezer Denny (1761–1822), Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1816–1817. Father of Harmar Denny.
    • Harmar Denny (1794–1852), Pennsylvania State Representative 1824–1829, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1829–1837, delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention 1837. Son of Ebenezer Denny.
      • Harmar D. Denny, Jr. (1886–1966), candidate for Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1941; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1951–1953. Great-grandson of Harmar Denny.[140]

The Dennys of Illinois and Washington[edit]

  • John Denny (1793–1875), Illinois State Representative. Father of Arthur A. Denny.[141]
    • Arthur A. Denny (1822–1899), Washington Territory Representative 1853–1861, Washington Territory Councilman 1862–1863, U.S. Congressional Delegate from Washington Territory 1865–1867. Son of John Denny.[142]

The Densons[edit]

  • William H. Beatty (1838–1914), District Court Judge in Nevada 1864–1874, Justice of the Nevada Supreme Court 1875–1878, Chief Justice of the Nevada Supreme Court 1879–1880, Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court 1888–1914. Brother-in-law of Samuel Crawford Denson.[143]
  • Samuel Crawford Denson (1839–1917), District Court Judge in California 1876–1881, Superior Court Judge in California 1881–1883, Nevada State Representative 1885–1886, District Attorney of Ormsby County, Nevada 1886–1888. Brother-in-law of William H. Beatty.[144]
  • William Henry Denson (1846–1906), Alabama State Representative 1876, U.S. Attorney in Alabama 1885–1889, U.S. Representative from Alabama 1893–1895. Fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Crawford Denson.[145]
  • N. D. Denson (1856–1927), Alabama State Senator 1884–1888, Circuit Court Judge in Alabama 1892–1904, Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court 1904–1909, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1916. Fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Crawford Denson.[146]
    • John Vernon Denson II, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Grandson of N. D. Denson.[147]

The Dentons[edit]

  • George K. Denton (1864–1926), U.S. Representative from Indiana 1917–1919, candidate for Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court 1924, candidate for Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Indiana 1926, died during campaign. Father of Winfield K. Denton.[148]
    • Winfield K. Denton (1896–1971), Prosecuting Attorney of Vanderburgh County, Indiana 1932–1936; member of the Indiana Legislature 1937–1942; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1949–1953 1955–1966; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952 1956 1960 1964. Son of George K. Denton.[149]

The Denvers[edit]

  • James W. Denver (1817–1892), California State Senator 1851, California Secretary of State 1853–1855, U.S. Representative from California 1855–1857, Governor of Kansas Territory 1857–1858. Father of Matthew R. Denver.[150]
    • Matthew R. Denver (1870–1954), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1896 1908 1912 1920 1924 1928 1930 1936, Ohio Democratic Committeeman 1896–1908 1926–1928, U.S. Representative from Ohio 1907–1913. Son of James W. Denver.[151]

The Deshas[edit]

  • Joseph Desha (1768–1842), Kentucky State Representative 1797 1799–1802, Kentucky State Senator 1803–1807, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1807–1819, candidate for Governor of Kentucky 1820, Governor of Kentucky 1824–1828. Brother of Robert Desha.[152]
  • Robert Desha (1791–1849), U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1827–1831. Brother of Joseph Desha.[153]

The Desnoyers[edit]

NOTE: Frank B. Desnoyers was also son-in-law of Wisconsin State Senator M. P. Lindsley.[156]

The Devers[edit]

  • William Emmett Dever (1862–1929), Mayor of Chicago, Illinois 1923–1927; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1924 1928. Cousin of Paul A. Dever.[157]
  • Paul A. Dever (1903–1958), Massachusetts State Representative 1928–1934, Attorney General of Massachusetts 1935–1941, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940 1952 1956, candidate for Governor of Massachusetts 1940, Governor of Massachusetts 1949–1953. Cousin of William Emmett Dever.[158]

The Dewarts[edit]

  • Lewis Dewart (1780–1852), Postmaster of Sunbury, Pennsylvania 1806–1816; Pennsylvania State Representative 1812–1820 1835–1840; Pennsylvania State Senator; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1831–1833; Chief Burgess of Sunbury, Pennsylvania; member of the Sunbury, Pennsylvania School Board; candidate for Democratic nomination for Governor of Pennsylvania 1840. Father of William Lewis Dewart.[159]
    • William Lewis Dewart (1821–1888), Chief Burgess of Sunbury, Pennsylvania 1845–1846; President of the Sunbury, Pennsylvania School Board; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1852 1856 1860 1884; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1854; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1857–1859. Son of Lewis Dewart.[160]

The Deweys[edit]

  • Edmund O. Dewey, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1908. Uncle of Thomas E. Dewey.[161]
    • Thomas Dewey (1902–1971), U.S. Attorney in New York 1933, District Attorney of New York County, New York 1937–1941; candidate for Governor of New York 1938; candidate for Republican nomination for President of the United States 1940; Governor of New York 1943–1955; candidate for President of the United States 1944 1948; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1952 1956. Nephew of Edmund O. Dewey.[162]

NOTE: Thomas Dewey was also grandnephew-in-law of U.S. Secretary of War Jefferson Davis.[163]

The DeWines[edit]

The De Witts[edit]

  • Charles De Witt (1727–1787), New York Colony 1768–1776, Delegate to the Continental Provisional Congress from New York Colony, Delegate to the Continental Congress from New York 1784, New York Assemblyman. Grandfather of Charles G. De Witt.[166]
    • Charles G. De Witt (1789–1839), U.S. Representative from New York 1829–1831, U.S. Chargé d'Affaires to Central America 1833–1839. Grandson of Charles De Witt.[167]

The Dexters[edit]

  • Samuel Dexter (1761–1816), Massachusetts State Representative 1788, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1793–1795, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts 1799–1800, U.S. Secretary of War 1800, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1801. Father of Samuel W. Dexter.[168]

The Diaz-Balarts[edit]

  • Lincoln Diaz-Balart (1954–), U.S. Representative from Florida 1993–present. Brother of Mario Diaz-Balart.[169]
  • Mario Diaz-Balart (1961–), U.S. Representative from Florida 2003–present. Brother of Lincoln Diaz-Balart.[170]

NOTE: Lincoln Diaz-Balart and Mario Diaz-Balart are also sons of Cuban politician Rafael Diaz-Balart and former nephews by marriage of Cuban President Fidel Castro.[171]

The Dicks[edit]

The Dickersons[edit]

  • Mahlon Dickerson (1770–1853), New Jersey Assemblyman 1811, Governor of New Jersey 1815–1817, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1817–1833, U.S. Secretary of the Navy 1834–1838, U.S. District Judge for New Jersey, delegate to the New Jersey Constitutional Convention 1844. Brother of Philemon Dickerson.[174]
  • Philemon Dickerson (1788–1862), New Jersey Assemblyman 1821–1822, U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1833–1836 1839–1841, Governor of New Jersey 1836–1837, U.S. District Judge for New Jersey. Brother of Mahlon Dickerson.[175]

The Dickersons of Nevada[edit]

The Dickinsons and Murfrees[edit]

The Dickinsons and Norris[edit]

  • Thomas Lloyd (1640–1694), Pennsylvania Colony Councilman, Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania Colony 1690–1693. Father-in-law of Isaac Norris.
    • Isaac Norris (1671–1735), Pennsylvania Colony Governor's Councilman, Pennsylvania Colony Assemblyman, Justice in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1717; Master of the High Court of Chancery in Pennsylvania Colony; Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1724–1725. Son-in-law of Thomas Lloyd.
    • James Logan (1674–1751), Commissioner of Property in Pennsylvania Colony 1701, Pennsylvania Colony Councilman 1703, Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1722–1723; Chief Justice of Pennsylvania Colony 1731–1739; acting Governor of Pennsylvania Colony 1736–1738. Father-in-law of Isaac Norris.
      • Isaac Norris (1701–1766), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Councilman; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Alderman; Pennsylvania Colony Assemblyman. Son of Isaac Norris.
        • John Dickinson (1732–1808), Pennsylvania Colony Assemblyman 1759–1761 1762–1764, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania 1774 1775–1776 1779–1781, Delaware Councilman 1781–1782, President of Delaware 1781–1782, President of Pennsylvania 1782–1785, delegate to the Delaware Constitutional Convention 1791–1792, Delaware State Senator 1793–1794. Son-in-law of Isaac Norris.[184]
        • Philemon Dickinson (1739–1809), delegate to the Continental Congress from Delaware 1782–1783, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1790–1793. Brother of John Dickinson.[185]

The Dickinsons and Letts[edit]

The Dickeys[edit]

The Dicksons[edit]

  • William Dickson (1770–1816), Tennessee State Representative 1799–1803, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1801–1807. Cousin of Molton Dickson.[190]
  • Molton Dickson (1775–1835), Tennessee State Representative 1823–1825. Cousin of William Dickson.[191]

The Dicksons and Whites[edit]

  • Andrew Dickson, New York Assemblyman 1832. Grandfather of Andrew D. White.[192]
    • Andrew D. White (1832–1918), New York State Senator 1864–1867, U.S. Minister to Germany 1889–1891, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1884 1912, U.S. Minister to Russia 1892–1894, U.S. Ambassador to Germany 1897–1902. Grandson of Andrew Dickson.[193]
      • Horace White (1865–1943), New York State Senator 1896–1908, Lieutenant Governor of New York 1909–1910, Governor of New York 1910. Nephew of Horace White.[194]

The Dies[edit]

The Diggses[edit]

  • Charles C. Diggs, Sr. (1894–1967), Michigan State Senator 1937–1944, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940, candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1948, candidate for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1952. Father of Charles Diggs.[197]
    • Charles Diggs (1922–1998), Michigan State Senator 1951–1954, U.S. Representative from Michigan 1955–1980, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1956 1960 1964. Son of Charles C. Diggs, Sr.[198]
    • Anna Diggs Taylor (1932–), U.S. District Court Judge in Michigan 1979–present. Former wife of Charles Diggs.[199]

The Dillinghams[edit]

  • Paul Dillingham (1799–1891), Justice of the Peace in Vermont 1826–1844, Clerk of Waterbury, Vermont 1829–1844; Vermont State Representative 1833–1835 1837–1840; Prosecuting Attorney of Washington County, Vermont 1835–1838; delegate to the Vermont Constitutional Convention 1836 1857 1870; Vermont State Senator 1841–1842 1861; U.S. Representative from Vermont 1843–1847; Lieutenant Governor of Vermont 1862–1865; Governor of Vermont 1865–1866. Father of William P. Dillingham and Frank Dillingham.[200]
    • William P. Dillingham (1843–1923), Prosecuting Attorney of Washington County, Vermont 1872–1876; Vermont State Representative 1876 1884; Vermont State Senator 1878 1880; Governor of Vermont 1888–1890; U.S. Senator from Vermont 1900–1923. Son of Paul Dillingham.[201]
    • Frank Dillingham, U.S. Consul in Auckland, New Zealand 1897–1903; U.S. Consul in Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany 1905–1906; U.S. Consul General in Auckland, New Zealand 1903–1905; U.S. Consul General in Coburg, Germany 1906–1912; U.S. Consul General in Winnipeg, Manitoba 1914. Son of Paul Dillingham.[202]

The Dimmicks[edit]

  • Dan Dimmick (1775–1825) lawyer, brother of Alpheus, father of Oliver S., Milo Melankthon, and William Harrison.
    • Oliver S. Dimmick (1804–1877), Pennsylvania representative, 1837–9, older brother of Milo Melankthon and William Harrison[203]
    • Milo Melankthon Dimmick (1811–1872), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1849–1853, candidate for President Judge in Pennsylvania 1853. Brother of William Harrison Dimmick.[204]
    • William Harrison Dimmick (1815–1861), Prosecuting Attorney of Wayne County, Pennsylvania 1836–1837; Pennsylvania State Senator 1845–1847; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1857–1861. Brother of Milo Melankthon Dimmick.[205]
  • Alpheus Dimmick (1787–1865), lawyer, judge, member of New York legislature in 1826, brother of Dan, father of Samuel Erskine[206]
    • Samuel E. Dimmick (1822–1875), Pennsylvania Attorney General (1873–1875). Son of Alpheus, father of Joseph Benjamin. (Samuel and his cousin William Harrison were also law partners, and opponents in the 1856 House election.)[207]

Note: These Dimmicks are descended from William Bradford (Plymouth Colony governor).[208]
Note: The strict paternal Dimmick line goes back to Timothy Dimmick, in Massachusetts by 1635, later an Elder of Barnstable, Massachusetts. They descend from the British Dymoke family of hereditary King's Champions. Note: Samuel's oldest son married Mary Scott Lord, but he died three months later, without issue. The widow later married Benjamin Harrison, after his presidency.

The Dingells[edit]

The Dinsmoors[edit]

  • Samuel Dinsmoor (1766–1835), U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 1811–1813, member of the New Hampshire Governor's Council 1821, New Hampshire State Court Judge 1823–1831, Governor of New Hampshire 1831–1834. Father of Samuel Dinsmoor, Jr.[213]

The Dixes and Morgans[edit]

  • John J. Morgan (1770–1849), New York Assemblyman 1819 1836–1840, U.S. Representative from New York 1821–1825 1834–1835. Father-in-law of John Adams Dix.[215]
    • John Adams Dix (1798–1879), New York Secretary of State 1833–1839, U.S. Senator from New York 1845–1849, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1861, U.S. Minister to France 1866–1869, Governor of New York 1873–1874. Son-in-law of John J. Morgan.[216]
      • John Alden Dix (1860–1928), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904 1912, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York 1908, Chairman of the New York Democratic Party 1910, Governor of New York 1911–1912. Nephew of John Adams Dix.[217]

The Dixons[edit]

  • Nathan F. Dixon (1774–1842), Rhode Island State Representative 1813–1830, U.S. Senator from Rhode Island 1839–1842. Father of Nathan F. Dixon.[218]
    • Nathan F. Dixon (1812–1881), member of the Rhode Island Legislature, U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1849–1851 1863–1871. Son of Nathan F. Dixon.[219]
      • Nathan F. Dixon III (1847–1897), U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1885, U.S. Senator from Rhode Island 1889–1895. Son of Nathan F. Fellows.[220]

The Dobbs and Jacksons[edit]

  • J.W. Dobbs (1882–1961), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1948 1952. Grandfather of Maynard Jackson.[221]
    • Maynard Jackson (1938–2003), candidate for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Georgia 1968, Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia 1974–1982 1990–1994; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1976 1980 2000, Democratic National Committeeman 1993. Grandson of J.W. Dobbs.[222]

The Dockerys[edit]

  • Alfred Dockery (1797–1875), member of the North Carolina House of Commons 1822, delegate to the North Carolina Constitutional Convention 1835, North Carolina State Senator 1836–1844, U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1845–1847 1851–1853, candidate for Governor of North Carolina 1854 1866. Father of Oliver H. Dockery.[223]
    • Oliver H. Dockery (1830–1906), North Carolina State Representative 1858–1859, U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1868–1871, delegate to the North Carolina Constitutional Convention 1875, candidate for Governor of North Carolina 1888, U.S. Consul General to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1889–1893. Son of Alfred Dockery.[224]

The Dockings[edit]

  • George Docking (1904–1964), Governor of Kansas 1957–1961. Father of Robert Docking.[225]
    • Robert Docking (1925–1983), Governor of Kansas 1967–1975. Son of George Docking.[226]
      • Thomas R. Docking, Lieutenant Governor of Kansas 1983–1987, candidate for Governor of Kansas 1988. Son of Robert Docking.
      • Jill Docking, candidate for U.S. Senate from Kansas 1996. Wife of Thomas R. Docking.[227]

The Dockweilers[edit]

  • Heinrich Dockweiler (1824–1887), Los Angeles Common Councilman 1870–1874. Father of Isidore B. Dockweiler.
    • Isidore B. Dockweiler (1867–1947), candidate for Lieutenant Governor of California 1902, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1908 1936 1940 1944, Democratic National Committeeman 1916–1932, candidate for U.S. Senate from California 1926. Father of John F. Dockweiler and Henry I. Dockweiler.[228]
      • John F. Dockweiler (1895–1943), U.S. Representative from California 1933–1939, candidate for the Democratic nomination for Governor of California 1938, District Attorney of Los Angeles County, California 1940–1943. Son of Isidore B. Dockweiler.[229]
      • Henry I. Dockweiler, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1948. Son of Isidore B. Dockweiler.[230]

The Dodds[edit]

  • Thomas Joseph Dodd (1870–1953), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1936. Father of Thomas J. Dodd.[231]

The Dodds of Michigan and Tennessee[edit]

The Dodges[edit]

  • Henry Dodge (1782–1867), Governor of Wisconsin Territory 1836–1841 1845–1848, U.S. Congressional Delegate from Wisconsin Territory 1841–1845, U.S. Senator from Wisconsin 1848–1857. Brother of Lewis F. Linn.[237]
  • Lewis F. Linn (1795–1843), U.S. Senator from Missouri 1833–1843. Brother of Henry Dodge.[238]
  • James Hugh Relfe (1791–1863), Missouri State Representative 1835–1844, U.S. Representative from Missouri 1843–1847. Brother-in-law of Lewis F. Linn.[239]
    • Augustus C. Dodge (1812–1883), U.S. Congressional Delegate from Iowa Territory 1840–1846, U.S. Senator from Iowa 1847–1855, U.S. Minister to Spain 1855–1859, candidate for Governor of Iowa 1859. Son of Henry Dodge.[240]
    • James Clarke (1812–1850), Secretary of Iowa Territory 1839–1841, Mayor of Burlington, Iowa 1844–1845; delegate to the Iowa Territory Constitutional Convention 1844; Governor of Iowa Territory 1845–1846. Son-in-law of Henry Dodge.[241]
      • Lewis Linn McArthur (1843–1897), Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court 1870–1878, Circuit Court Judge in Oregon 1883–1886, U.S. Attorney for Oregon 1886–1890. Grandnephew of Lewis F. Linn.
        • Clifton N. McArthur (1879–1923), Oregon State Representative 1909–1913, U.S. Representative from Oregon 1915–1923. Son of Lewis Linn McArthur.[242]

NOTE: Clifton N. McArthur was also grandson of U.S. Senator James W. Nesmith.[243]

The Doles[edit]

The Dollivers[edit]

NOTE: Jonathan Prentiss Dolliver was also cousin of U.S. Representative William G. Brown, Jr..[248]

The Dolphs and Mulkeys[edit]

The Dominicks and Smiths[edit]

  • Howard Alexander Smith (1880–1966), Chairman of the New Jersey Republican Party 1941–1943, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1948 1956, Republican National Committeeman 1942–1943, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1944–1959. Uncle of Peter H. Dominick.[251]
    • Peter H. Dominick (1915–1981), Colorado State Representative 1957–1961, U.S. Representative from Colorado 1961–1963, U.S. Senator from Colorado 1963–1975, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1964 1972, U.S. Ambassador to Switzerland 1975. Nephew of Howard Alexander Smith.[252]

The Donaheys[edit]

  • A. Victor Donahey (1873–1946), Auditor of Tuscarawas County, Ohio 1905–1909; delegate to the Ohio Constitutional Convention 1912; Auditor of Ohio 1913–1921; candidate for Governor of Ohio 1920; Governor of Ohio 1923–1929; U.S. Senator from Ohio 1935–1941. Father of John W. Donahey.[253]
    • John W. Donahey, Lieutenant Governor of Ohio 1959–1963, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960. Son of A. Victor Donahey.[254]
    • Gertrude Walton Donahey (1908–2004), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1964 1968, Treasurer of Ohio 1971–1983. Wife of John W. Donahey.[255]

The Donnells[edit]

  • L.A. Donnell (1906–1959), Mayor of Wichita, Kansas 1948–1949 1954–1955. Father of James M. Donnell.[256]
    • James M. Donnell, Mayor of Wichita, Kansas 1873–1974 1976–1977. Son of L.A. Donnell.[257]

The Doolings[edit]

  • Peter J. Dooling (1857–1931), New York State Senator 1903–1905, U.S. Representative from New York 1913–1921, New York Democratic Committeeman 1930. Father of James J. Dooling.[258]
    • James J. Dooling (1893–1937), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1936. Son of Peter J. Dooling.[259]

The Dorns[edit]

  • T.E. Dorn, School Superintendent of Greenwood County, South Carolina. Father of William Jennings Bryan Dorn.
    • William Jennings Bryan Dorn (1916–2005), South Carolina State Representative 1939–1940, South Carolina State Senator 1941–1943, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1947–1949 1951–1974, candidate for U.S. Senate from South Carolina 1948, candidate for Governor of South Carolina 1974, candidate for the Democratic nomination for South Carolina State Representative 1978, Chairman of the South Carolina Democratic Party 1980–1984, Democratic National Committeeman 1980–1984. Son of T.E. Dorn.[260]

The Dornans[edit]

delegate to the Republican National Convention 1976; U.S. Representative from California 1977–1983 1985–1997; candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate from California 1982; candidate for the Republican nomination for President of the United States 1996; candidate for U.S. Representative from California 1998. Father of Mark Dornan.[261]

    • Mark Dornan (1959–), candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Representative from California 2000. Son of Robert K. Dornan.[262]

The Dotys and Martins[edit]

  • James D. Doty (1799–1865), Clerk of Court of Michigan Territory, U.S. Judge in Michigan Territory, U.S. Congressional Delegate from Wisconsin Territory 1839–1841, Governor of Wisconsin Territory 1841–1844, delegate to the Wisconsin Territory Constitutional Convention 1846, U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 1849–1853, Treasurer of Utah Territory 1863, Governor of Utah Territory 1863. Cousin of Morgan L. Martin.[263]
  • Morgan L. Martin (1805–1887), member of the Michigan Territory Legislature 1831–1835, member of the Wisconsin Territory Legislature 1838–1844, U.S. Congressional Delegate from Wisconsin Territory 1845–1847, Wisconsin Assemblyman 1855, Wisconsin State Senator 1858–1859, candidate for U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 1866, Judge of Brown County, Wisconsin 1875–1887. Cousin of James D. Doty.[264]

The Doughtons[edit]

A political family from rural Alleghany County in the North Carolina mountains, they rose to considerable power in both Congress and the state government of North Carolina.

The Douglases[edit]

  • James Madison (1751–1836), Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1780–1783, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1797, U.S. Secretary of State 1801–1809, President of the United States 1809–1817. Granduncle by marriage of Stephen A. Douglas.
    • Stephen A. Douglas (1813–1861), Illinois State Attorney 1835, Illinois State Representative 1836–1837, Register of the Land Office of Springfield, Illinois 1837; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 1838; Illinois Secretary of State 1840–1841; U.S. Senator from Illinois 1847–1961; candidate for President of the United States 1860. Grandnephew of James Madison.[269]
    • Robert P. Dick (1823–1898), Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. Father-in-law of Robert M. Douglas.

The Downeys[edit]

  • Stephen Wheeler Downey (1839–1902), Prosecuting Attorney of Albany County, Wyoming 1869–1870 1899–1902; Wyoming Territory Councilman; Treasurer of Wyoming Territory 1872–1875; Auditor of Wyoming Territory 1877–1879; U.S. Congressional Delegate from Wyoming Territory 1879–1881; delegate to the Wyoming Constitutional Convention 1889; Wyoming State Representative 1893 1895. Father of Sheridan Downey.[272]
    • Sheridan Downey (1884–1961), U.S. Senator from California 1939–1950. Son of Stephen Wheeler Downey.[273]

The Downeys of New York[edit]

  • Norma Morgillo Downey, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2000. Mother of Thomas J. Downey.[274]
    • Thomas J. Downey (1949–), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1972 1984, member of the New York Legislature 1972–1974, U.S. Representative from New York 1975–1993. Son of Norma Morgillo Downey.[275]

The Downses[edit]

The Doyles and Bachhubers[edit]

  • Max Bachhuber, Wisconsin Assemblyman 1860 1864 1875. Father of Andrew Bachhuber.
    • Andrew Bachhuber, Wisconsin Assemblyman 1885. Son of Max Bachhuber.
      • Frank E. Bachhuber, Wisconsin Assemblyman 1933. Son of Andrew Bachhuber.
        • Ruth Bachhuber Doyle (1916–2006), Wisconsin Assemblywoman 1949–1953. Daughter of Frank E. Bachhuber.
        • James Edward Doyle (1915–1987), Chairman of the Wisconsin Democratic Party 1951–1953, U.S. District Court Judge in Wisconsin 1965–1987. Husband of Ruth Bachhuber Doyle.

NOTE: James E. Doyle, Jr. is also nephew by marriage of U.S. Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird.[278]

The Drapers[edit]

  • William F. Draper (1842–1910), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1876, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1893–1897, U.S. Ambassador to Italy 1897–1900. Brother of Ebenezer Sumner Draper.[279]
  • Ebenezer Sumner Draper (1858–1914), Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts 1906–1909, Governor of Massachusetts 1909–1911. Brother of William F. Draper.[280]
    • Eben S. Draper, Massachusetts State Representative 1921–1922, Massachusetts State Senator 1923–1926, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1928. Son of Ebenezer Sumner Draper.[281]

NOTE: Ebenezer Sumner Draper was also son-in-law of U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Benjamin Bristow[282] and grandson-in-law of U.S. Representative Francis M. Bristow.

The Draytons[edit]

  • William Drayton, Sr. (1733–1790), U.S. District Court Judge of South Carolina. Father of William Drayton.
    • William Drayton (1776–1846), South Carolina State Representative 1806–1808, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1825–1833. Son of William Drayton, Sr.

The Drews and the Elams of Louisiana[edit]

Dreyfus[edit]

  • Claire Dreyfus, member of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin School Board. Mother of Lee S. Dreyfus.
    • Lee S. Dreyfus (1926–2008), Governor of Wisconsin 1979–1983. Father of Lee S. Dreyfus, Jr.[287]
      • Lee S. Dreyfus, Jr., Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge. Son of Lee S. Dreyfus.

Driehaus[edit]

  • H. Donald Driehaus, candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1968, Co-Chairman of the Hamilton County, Ohio Democratic Party 1988–1991. Father of Steven L. Driehaus and Denise Driehaus.
    • Steven L. Driehaus (1966–), Ohio State Representative 2001–2009, U.S. Representative from Ohio 2009–present. Son of H. Donald Driehaus.
    • Denise Driehaus, Ohio State Representative 2009–present. Daughter of H. Donald Driehaus.

The Dromgooles and Sims[edit]

  • George Dromgoole (1797–1847), Virginia State Representative 1823–1826, Virginia State Senator 1826–1835, delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1829, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1835–1841 1843–1847. Uncle of Alexander D. Sims.[288]

The Drydens, Kusers, and Marshalls[edit]

The Dubois[edit]

  • Jesse K. Dubois, Illinois State Representative 1835–1941 1843–1845, Illinois Auditor of Public Accounts 1857–1864, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1868. Father of Fred T. Dubois.[293]
    • Fred T. Dubois (1851–1930), U.S. Congressional Delegate from Idaho Territory 1887–1890, U.S. Senator from Idaho 1891–1897 1901–1907, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1892 1896, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904. Son of Jesse K. Dubois.[294]

The Dudley-Winthrop family[edit]

A political family spanning the country's history. Notable members include:

The Duells[edit]

  • R. Holland Duell (1824–1891), District Attorney of Cortland County, New York 1850–1855; Judge of Cortland County, New York 1855–1859; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1856 1868; U.S. Representative from New York 1859–1863 1871–1875; U.S. Commissioner of Patents 1875–1877. Father of Charles H. Duell.[295]
    • Charles H. Duell (1850–1920), New York Assemblyman 1880, U.S. Commissioner of Patents 1898–1901. Son of R. Holland Duell.[296]
      • Holland S. Duell, New York Assemblyman 1907 1909, New York State Senator 1921–1922. Son of Charles H. Duell.[297]

The Dukakises and Chaffetzes[edit]

  • Olympia Dukakis (1931–), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1988. Cousin of Michael Dukakis.
  • Michael Dukakis (1933–), Massachusetts State Representative 1963–1971, Governor of Massachusetts 1975–1979 1983–1991, candidate for President of the United States 1988. Cousin of Olympia Dukakis.[298]
    • Michael Dukakis has a stepson, John Dukakis (whose surname was originally Chaffetz). John Dukakis has a younger half-brother, none other than Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who represents Utah's 3rd District. (Kitty Dukakis was once married to Chaffetz's father and then married Dukakis, so that's how the connection works.)[299][300]

The Dulleses[edit]

Main article: Dulles family

NOTE: Robert Lansing was also son-in-law of U.S. Secretary of State John W. Foster.[304]

The Duncans[edit]

The Dunhams[edit]

[313]

The Duns, McCormicks, and Thurmans[edit]

  • Allen G. Thurman (1813–1895), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1845–1847, Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court 1851–1854, Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court 1854–1856, candidate for Governor of Ohio 1867, U.S. Senator from Ohio 1869–1881, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1888. Uncle of Edwin Dun.[316]
    • Edwin Dun (1848–1931), U.S. Minister to Japan 1893–1897. Nephew of Allen G. Thurman.[317]
    • Richard C. McCormick (1832–1901), Secretary of the Arizona Territory 1863–1866, Governor of the Arizona Territory 1866–1869, U.S. Congressional Delegate from the Arizona Territory 1869–1875, U.S. Representative from New York 1895–1897. Son-in-law of Allen G. Thurman.[318]

The Dunns[edit]

  • Aubert Dunn (1896–1987), U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1935–1937, Circuit Court Judge in Mississippi 1966. Father of Winfield Dunn.[319]
    • Winfield Dunn (1927–), Governor of Tennessee 1971–1975, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972 2004. Son of Aubert Dunn.[320]

The Dunns and Thayers[edit]

  • James Clement Dunn (1890–1979), U.S. Ambassador to Italy 1946–1952, U.S. Ambassador to France 1952–1953, U.S. Ambassador to Spain 1953–1955, U.S. Ambassador to Brazil 1955–1956. Father-in-law of Charles W. Thayer.[321]

The du Ponts[edit]

Main articles: du Pont family and du Pont company

The du Pont immigrant to the United States, Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours (1739–1817) was deputy of the Third Estate to the Estates-General of 1789 for the region of Nemours in France. The du Pont political dynasty is based on the family's manufacturing empire in Delaware.

The Dupres and Moutons[edit]

  • Jacques Dupre (1773–1846), Louisiana State Representative, Louisiana State Senator, Governor of Louisiana 1830–1831. Grandfather-in-law of Alexander Mouton.
    • Alexander Mouton (1804–1885), Louisiana State Representative 1827–1831 1836, candidate for U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1830, U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1837–1842, Governor of Louisiana 1842–1846. Grandson-in-law of Jacques Dupre.

The Durands and Moores[edit]

  • John Moore, Mayor of Saginaw, Michigan 1861–1863; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1862; candidate for Governor of Michigan 1868; Circuit Court Judge in Michigan 1871–1874. Father-in-law Lorenzo T. Durand.[325]
    • George H. Durand (1838–1903), Flint, Michigan Alderman 1862–1867; Mayor of Flint, Michigan 1873–1874; U.S. Representative from Michigan 1875–1877; Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court 1892–1893. Brother of Lorenzo T. Durand.[326]
    • Lorenzo T. Durand (1849–1917), Prosecuting Attorney of Saginaw County, Michigan 1879–1882; candidate for Governor of Michigan 1902; candidate for Circuit Court Judge in Michigan 1917. Brother of George H. Durand.[327]

The Dwights[edit]

  • Jeremiah W. Dwight (1819–1885), Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Dryden, New York 1857–1858; New York Assemblyman 1860–1861; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1868 1872 1876 1880 1884; U.S. Representative from New York 1877–1883. Father of John Wilbur Dwight.[328]

The Dyers[edit]

  • Benjamin Dyer (1778–1823), Virginia House Delegate 1819–1822. Father of Benjamin Dyer, Jr.[330]
    • Benjamin Dyer, Jr. (1821–1914), Virginia House Delegate 1876–1879. Son of Benjamin Dyer.[331]
    • David Patterson Dyer (1838–1924), Missouri State Representative 1862–1865, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1868, U.S. Representative from Missouri 1869–1871, candidate for Governor of Missouri 1880, U.S. Attorney in Missouri 1902–1907, U.S. Judge in Missouri 1907–1919. Nephew of Benjamin Dyer.[332]
      • Leonidas C. Dyer (1871–1857), U.S. Representative from Missouri 1811–1813 1815–1833, candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 1834 1836. Nephew of David Patterson Dyer.[333]
        • Otis M. Dyer (1899–1989), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1964. Relative of David Patterson Dyer and Leonidas C. Dyer.[334]

The Dyers of Rhode Island[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Index to Politicians: Dales to Dalto. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  2. ^ Index to Politicians: Dales to Dalto. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  3. ^ PELOSI, Nancy – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  4. ^ Index to Politicians: Pelagatti to Pendlebury. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  5. ^ Index to Politicians: Dale. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  6. ^ Index to Politicians: Dale. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  7. ^ Richard J. Daley (American politician and lawyer) – Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Britannica.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  8. ^ Richard M Daley – Mayor of Chicago. City Mayors. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  9. ^ The Washington Post. 15 December 1999 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/govt/admin/daley.htm |url= missing title (help). 
  10. ^ Third Generation Chicago Native: John Daley, 11th District Cook County Commissioner, Finance Committee, Chair, and brother of Da Mayor. Thirdgenerationchicagonative.blogspot.com (14 June 2007). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  11. ^ Index to Politicians: Dales to Dalto. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  12. ^ Index to Politicians: Dales to Dalto. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  13. ^ Alexander Dallas Bache. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  14. ^ Index to Politicians: Walker, O to R. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  15. ^ Index to Politicians: Brewster. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  16. ^ Index to Politicians: Pelagatti to Pendlebury. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  17. ^ Index to Politicians: Franklin. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  18. ^ Index to Politicians: Pelagatti to Pendlebury. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  19. ^ Index to Politicians: Claiborne. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  20. ^ Index to Politicians: Claiborne. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  21. ^ Index to Politicians: Claiborne. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  22. ^ Index to Politicians: Dalton to Daluz. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  23. ^ Index to Politicians: Dalton to Daluz. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  24. ^ Index to Politicians: Danae to Danhof. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  25. ^ Index to Politicians: Danae to Danhof. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  26. ^ Governor Rell: Governor Rell Nominates Assistant U.S. Attorney John A. Danaher III for Public Safety Commissioner. Ct.gov (28 February 2007). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  27. ^ Index to Politicians: Reynolds-brown to Rhoderick. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  28. ^ Index to Politicians: Reynolds-brown to Rhoderick. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  29. ^ Index to Politicians: Danae to Danhof. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  30. ^ Index to Politicians: Houston. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  31. ^ Index to Politicians: Dani to Daniello. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  32. ^ Index to Politicians: Dani to Daniello. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  33. ^ Index to Politicians: Houston. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  34. ^ Index to Politicians: Hubbard. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  35. ^ Index to Politicians: Dani to Daniello. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  36. ^ Cedar Falls Manufacturing Company 1889 – North Carolina – signed by John Milton Worth. Scripophily.net. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  37. ^ Hon. Josephus Daniels. Electricscotland.com (5 March 1913). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  38. ^ Index to Politicians: Daniels. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  39. ^ Congresswoman Pat Danner to Retire; Who Stands Where on Eight Pending Bills, Letters. Wrmea.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  40. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  41. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  42. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  43. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  44. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  45. ^ Index to Politicians: Roberts, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  46. ^ Index to Politicians: Darlington. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  47. ^ Index to Politicians: Butler, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  48. ^ Index to Politicians: Butler, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  49. ^ Index to Politicians: Butler, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  50. ^ Index to Politicians: Butler, U to Z. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  51. ^ DAVENPORT, John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  52. ^ DAVENPORT, James – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  53. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  54. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  55. ^ Index to Politicians: Vance. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  56. ^ DAVIS, Amos – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  57. ^ DAVIS, Garrett – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  58. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  59. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  60. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  61. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  62. ^ DAVIS, Henry Gassaway – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (11 March 1916). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  63. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  64. ^ Index to Politicians: Eliphas to Ellertson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  65. ^ Index to Politicians: Eliphas to Ellertson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  66. ^ John Davis (1787–1854). Mass.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  67. ^ Index to Politicians: Ballam to Bancroft. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  68. ^ John Chandler Bancroft Davis – United, Law, Secretary, Court, Massachusetts, and Britain – JRank Articles. Law.jrank.org. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  69. ^ LODGE, Henry Cabot, Jr. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  70. ^ Index to Politicians: Lockyear to Lofvegren. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  71. ^ Index to Politicians: Lockyear to Lofvegren. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  72. ^ Index to Politicians: Cabaldon to Cadwell. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  73. ^ MILLS, Elijah Hunt – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  74. ^ Index to Politicians: Freeman-wilson to Fremming. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  75. ^ LODGE, Henry Cabot – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (9 November 1924). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  76. ^ Index to Politicians: Gardner. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  77. ^ Index to Politicians: Minore to Mitchel. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  78. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  79. ^ Index to Politicians: Alexander. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  80. ^ Index to Politicians: Braecklein to Brancato. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  81. ^ Index to Politicians: Root. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  82. ^ TREDWELL, Thomas – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  83. ^ DAVIS, Thomas Treadwell – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  84. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis-anthony to Dawsey. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  85. ^ DAWES, Charles Gates – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  86. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis-anthony to Dawsey. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  87. ^ DAWES, Beman Gates – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  88. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  89. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  90. ^ Index to Politicians: Whitten to Wiczynski. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  91. ^ Index to Politicians: Beckerle to Bedel. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  92. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawyn to Day. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  93. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawyn to Day. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  94. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawyn to Day. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  95. ^ Index to Politicians: Dawyn to Day. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  96. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Dayan to Deamer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  97. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Dayan to Deamer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  98. ^ Index to Politicians: Dayan to Deamer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  99. ^ DAYTON, Elias – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  100. ^ DAYTON, Jonathan – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  101. ^ DEARBORN, Henry – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  102. ^ DEARBORN, Henry Alexander Scammell – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  103. ^ Arizona Attorney General. Dic.academic.ru (7 November 2006). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  104. ^ Dennis DeConcini. Nndb.com (20 June 1985). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  105. ^ "Membership of the Louisiana House of Representatives, 1812-2016 (Bossier and Webster parishes)". house.louisiana.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2013. 
  106. ^ "Results for Election Date: 10/24/1987 (Bossier Parish)". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  107. ^ Index to Politicians: Deckert to Deguilo. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  108. ^ Index to Politicians: Deckert to Deguilo. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  109. ^ Index to Politicians: Frazer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  110. ^ Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, August 29, 2008, p. 1B
  111. ^ Index to Politicians: Delany to Delawarr. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  112. ^ Index to Politicians: Dentler to Derow. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  113. ^ Index to Politicians: Delay to Delzell. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  114. ^ Index to Politicians: Gibbons. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  115. ^ Index to Politicians: Tooley to Tostofson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  116. ^ Index to Politicians: Tooley to Tostofson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  117. ^ Index to Politicians: Hawkland to Haxtun. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  118. ^ Olcott H. Deming. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  119. ^ Rust M. Deming. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  120. ^ Index to Politicians: Fitch. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  121. ^ Index to Politicians: Dempski to Denish. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  122. ^ Index to Politicians: Dempski to Denish. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  123. ^ Index to Politicians: Dempski to Denish. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  124. ^ Index to Politicians: Alsup to Amerson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  125. ^ DENISON, George – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  126. ^ DENISON, Charles – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  127. ^ Mayors of Green Bay. Ci.green-bay.wi.us. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  128. ^ DENNIS, John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  129. ^ DENNIS, John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  130. ^ DENNIS, Littleton Purnell – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  131. ^ Index to Politicians: White, E to F. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  132. ^ Index to Politicians: White, K to N. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  133. ^ Index to Politicians: White, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  134. ^ Index to Politicians: White, A to B. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  135. ^ Index to Politicians: White, U to Z. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  136. ^ Index to Politicians: White, E to F. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  137. ^ Rantings of a Civil War Historian » Memorial Day 2008. Civilwarcavalry.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  138. ^ William Neil Dennison son of Gov. William Dennison. Genforum.genealogy.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  139. ^ Index to Politicians: Dennise to Dennison. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  140. ^ DENNY, Harmar Denny, Jr. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  141. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  142. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  143. ^ Index to Politicians: Beatty to Beatty-smith. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  144. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  145. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  146. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  147. ^ Index to Politicians: Denniston to Denson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  148. ^ DENTON, George Kirkpatrick – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  149. ^ DENTON, Winfield Kirkpatrick – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  150. ^ DENVER, James William – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  151. ^ DENVER, Matthew Rombach – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  152. ^ DESHA, Joseph – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  153. ^ DESHA, Robert – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  154. ^ Index to Politicians: Derr to Desvoignes. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  155. ^ Index to Politicians: Derr to Desvoignes. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  156. ^ Index to Politicians: Lindskoog to Lindy. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  157. ^ Index to Politicians: Detamble to Devin. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  158. ^ Index to Politicians: Detamble to Devin. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  159. ^ DEWART, Lewis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  160. ^ DEWART, William Lewis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  161. ^ Index to Politicians: Dewey to Dewhurst. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  162. ^ Index to Politicians: Dewey to Dewhurst. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  163. ^ Index to Politicians: Davis, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  164. ^ [1][dead link]
  165. ^ Dayton, Ohio, news and information. DaytonDailyNews (17 January 2009). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  166. ^ Index to Politicians: Dewilton to Dexheimer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  167. ^ DE WITT, Charles Gerrit – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  168. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Dexter. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  169. ^ DIAZ-BALART, Lincoln – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  170. ^ DIAZ-BALART, Mario – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  171. ^ Naked Politics. Miamiherald.typepad.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  172. ^ DICK, John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  173. ^ DICK, Samuel Bernard – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (10 May 1907). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  174. ^ DICKERSON, Mahlon – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  175. ^ DICKERSON, Philemon – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  176. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickerson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  177. ^ The Journal of the Assembly – Nevada. Legislature. Assembly – Google Books. Books.google.com (25 September 2009). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  178. ^ American legislative leaders in the ... – Nancy Weatherly Sharp, James Roger Sharp – Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  179. ^ Clark County, NV
  180. ^ [2][dead link]
  181. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickerson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  182. ^ Index to Politicians: Murdy to Murphrey. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  183. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickinson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  184. ^ About the Books of Isaac Norris. Deila.dickinson.edu. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  185. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickinson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  186. ^ DICKINSON, Lester Jesse – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  187. ^ LETTS, Fred Dickinson – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  188. ^ DICKEY, John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  189. ^ DICKEY, Oliver James – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  190. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickison to Dikis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  191. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickison to Dikis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  192. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickison to Dikis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  193. ^ Index to Politicians: White, A to B. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  194. ^ Index to Politicians: White, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  195. ^ DIES, Martin – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  196. ^ DIES, Martin, Jr. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  197. ^ Index to Politicians: Dickison to Dikis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  198. ^ Charles Diggs, Jr. Nndb.com (7 October 1978). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  199. ^ Anna Diggs Taylor. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  200. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilan to Diluglio. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  201. ^ DILLINGHAM, William Paul – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (12 July 1923). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  202. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilan to Diluglio. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  203. ^ "History of Pike County". 
  204. ^ DIMMICK, Milo Melankthon – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  205. ^ DIMMICK, William Harrison – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  206. ^ Obituary record of graduates. Yale University. 1870. p. 164. 
  207. ^ See article.
  208. ^ See Samuel E. Dimmick article for references.
  209. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilweg to Dious. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  210. ^ John Dingell. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  211. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilweg to Dious. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  212. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilweg to Dious. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  213. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilweg to Dious. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  214. ^ Index to Politicians: Dilweg to Dious. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  215. ^ MORGAN, John Jordan – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  216. ^ DIX, John Adams – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  217. ^ Index to Politicians: Dipaola to Dixie. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  218. ^ DIXON, Nathan Fellows – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  219. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  220. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  221. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon-smith to Dodaro. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  222. ^ Index to Politicians: Jackson, K to N. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  223. ^ DOCKERY, Alfred – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  224. ^ DOCKERY, Oliver Hart – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (21 March 1906). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  225. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon-smith to Dodaro. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  226. ^ Robert Docking. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  227. ^ Dinell, David (21 September 2003). "Jill Docking finds passion in financial education for Kansas' youth". 
  228. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon-smith to Dodaro. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  229. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon-smith to Dodaro. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  230. ^ Index to Politicians: Dixon-smith to Dodaro. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  231. ^ Index to Politicians: Dodd. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  232. ^ Index to Politicians: Dodd. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  233. ^ DODD, Christopher John – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  234. ^ Index to Politicians: Doddato to Dodero. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  235. ^ Index to Politicians: Doddato to Dodero. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  236. ^ Index to Politicians: Doddato to Dodero. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  237. ^ DODGE, Henry – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  238. ^ LINN, Lewis Fields – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  239. ^ Index to Politicians: Reily to Remy. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  240. ^ DODGE, Augustus Caesar – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  241. ^ Index to Politicians: Clark-coleman to Clarke. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  242. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcalmine to Mcbreen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  243. ^ NESMITH, James Willis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  244. ^ DOLE, Robert Joseph – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  245. ^ DOLE, Elizabeth Hanford – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  246. ^ DOLLIVER, Jonathan Prentiss – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (15 October 1910). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  247. ^ DOLLIVER, James Isaac – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  248. ^ Index to Politicians: Brown, U to Z. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  249. ^ DOLPH, Joseph Norton – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  250. ^ MULKEY, Frederick William – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  251. ^ SMITH, Howard Alexander – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  252. ^ DOMINICK, Peter Hoyt – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  253. ^ Index to Politicians: Dohlman to Donahower. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  254. ^ Index to Politicians: Dohlman to Donahower. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  255. ^ Gertrude W. Donahey - Ohio History Central
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  257. ^ City of Wichita – Previous Wichita Mayors 1950–1989. Wichitagov.org. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  258. ^ Index to Politicians: Donovon to Dormady. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  259. ^ Index to Politicians: Donovon to Dormady. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  260. ^ William J. B. Dorn. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  261. ^ Bob Dornan. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  262. ^ Index to Politicians: Dormandy to Dorsett. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  263. ^ DOTY, James Duane – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  264. ^ MARTIN, Morgan Lewis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  265. ^ Index to Politicians: Dorsh to Dougher. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  266. ^ Index to Politicians: Doughrity to Doughty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  267. ^ Index to Politicians: Doughrity to Doughty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  268. ^ Index to Politicians: Doughrity to Doughty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  269. ^ Special Collections Research Center. Lib.uchicago.edu. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  270. ^ Home: State Archives of North Carolina
  271. ^ Index to Politicians: Douglas. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  272. ^ DOWNEY, Stephen Wheeler – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (3 August 1902). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  273. ^ DOWNEY, Sheridan – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  274. ^ Index to Politicians: Down to Downie. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  275. ^ Thomas J. Downey. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  276. ^ a b "Rick, Markway, "The Prosecutor: District Attorney James Crawford 'Jam' Downs"". lwaa.org. Retrieved June 27, 2013. 
  277. ^ Jim Doyle. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  278. ^ Index to Politicians: Laird. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  279. ^ Index to Politicians: Draper. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  280. ^ Index to Politicians: Draper. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  281. ^ Index to Politicians: Draper. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  282. ^ Index to Politicians: Brighams to Brittney. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  283. ^ "Richard Drew Carey (1934-2013), cousin of Harmon Drew, Jr., The Drew Family of Minden, Louisiana". mindenmemories.org. Retrieved December 2, 2013. 
  284. ^ Encyclopedia of Louisianana Biography; Shreveport Times, October 25, 1935; Mansfield Enterprise, obituary, October 29, 1935
  285. ^ "Joseph Barton Elam, Sr.". lahistory.org. Retrieved July 10, 2014. 
  286. ^ Alcee Fortier, Louisiana, III (1909); Mansfield Enterprise, September 7, 1917
  287. ^ Lee S. Dreyfus: 1926–2008. JSOnline (4 January 2008). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  288. ^ DROMGOOLE, George Coke – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
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