List of United States political families (M)

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The following is an alphabetical list of political families in the United States whose last name begins with M.

Contents

The Mabeys[edit]

  • Charles R. Mabey (1877–1959), Mayor of Bountiful, Utah; Utah State Representative 1913–1916; Governor of Utah 1921–1925; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1924. Father of Rendell N. Mabey.[1]
    • Rendell N. Mabey, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1936, Utah State Representative 1942–1950, candidate for Governor of Utah 1948, Utah State Senator 1951–1956. Son of Charles R. Mabey.[2]

The MacArthurs[edit]

NOTE: Douglas MacArthur was also brother-in-law of U.S. Minister James H.R. Cromwell.[5]

The Macks, Shepards and Connallys[edit]

  • John Levi Sheppard, Democratic Congressman from Texas[6]
    • Morris Sheppard, Democratic Congressman and Senator from Texas, son of John L. Sheppard[7]
    • Tom Connally, Democratic Congressman and Senator from Texas, married Sheppard's widow[8]
      • Richard S. Arnold (1936–2004), candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1966 1972, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1968, delegate to the Arkansas Constitutional Convention 1969 1970, U.S. District Court Judge in Arkansas 1978–1980, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1980–2001. Great-grandson of John Levi Sheppard.[9]
      • Connie Mack III, Republican Congressman (1983–1989) and Senator from Florida (1989–2001), Connally's step-grandson and Sheppard's maternal grandson[10]
      • Morris S. Arnold (1941–), U.S. District Court Judge in Arkansas 1985–1992, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1992–present. Great-grandson of John Levi Sheppard.[11]

NOTE: Mary Bono is also widow of U.S. Representative Sonny Bono.[14]

The Macks and Wadsworths[edit]

The Maclays[edit]

The MacVeaghs and Camerons[edit]

  • William Cameron (1795–1877), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860. Brother of Simon Cameron.[21]
  • Simon Cameron (1799–1889), U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1845–1849 1857–1861 1867–1877, candidate for Republican nomination for President of the United States 1860, U.S. Secretary of War 1861–1862, U.S. Minister to Russia 1862. Brother of William Cameron.[22]
    • J. Donald Cameron (1833–1918), U.S. Secretary of War 1876–1877, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1877–1897, Chairman of the Republican National Committee 1879–1880. Son of Simon Cameron.[23]
    • Wayne MacVeagh (1833–1917), Chairman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party 1863, delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention 1872, U.S. Ambassador to Turkey 1870–1871, U.S. Attorney General 1881. Son-in-law of Simon Cameron.[24]
    • Franklin MacVeagh (1837–1834), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1909–1913. Brother of Wayne MacVeagh.[25]
      • Charles MacVeagh (1860–1931), U.S. Ambassador to Japan 1925–1928. Son of Wayne MacVeagh.[26]
        • Lincoln MacVeagh (1890–1972), U.S. Ambassador to Greece 1933–1941 1943–1947, U.S. Ambassador to Iceland 1941–1942, U.S. Ambassador to South Africa 1942–1943, U.S. Ambassador to Portugal 1948–1952, U.S. Ambassador to Spain 1952–1953. Son of Charles MacVeagh.[27]

NOTE: J. Donald Cameron was also nephew by marriage of U.S. Secretary of War William Tecumseh Sherman.[28]

The Madigans[edit]

  • Edward R. Madigan (1936–1994), Illinois State Representative 1967–1972, U.S. Representative from Illinois 1973–1991, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1980, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture 1991–1993. Brother of Robert Madigan.[29]
  • Robert Madigan, Clerk of Lincoln, Illinois; Illinois State Senator. Brother Edward R. Madigan.

The Madigans (II)[edit]

NOTE: Not related to Edward R. and Robert Madigan.

The Madisons[edit]

  • Thomas Madison (1746–1798), Sheriff of Augusta County, Virginia. Brother of George Madison.
  • George Madison (1763–1816), Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts 1796–1816, Governor of Kentucky 1816. Brother of Thomas Madison.
  • James Madison (1751–1836), member of the Virginia Legislature 1776, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1780–1783 1787–1788, delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention 1787, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1797, U.S. Secretary of State 1801–1809, President of the United States 1809–1817. Second cousin of Thomas Madison and George Madison.

NOTE: Thomas Madison was also brother-in-law of Virginia Governor Patrick Henry. James Madison was also second cousin of U.S. President Zachary Taylor,[32] second cousin thrice removed of Missouri Governor Elliot Woolfolk Major[33] and Missouri legislator Edgar Bailey Woolfolk,[34] and brother-in-law of U.S. Representative John G. Jackson[35] and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thomas Todd.

The Magees[edit]

  • Walter W. Magee (1861–1927), U.S. Representative from New York 1915–1927. Brother of Edward M. Magee.[36]
  • Edward M. Magee (1863–1934), New York Assemblyman 1913–1915. Brother of Water W. Magee.[37]

The Magoffins, Shannons, and Shelbys[edit]

  • Isaac Shelby (1750–1826), member of the Virginia Legislature 1779, member of the North Carolina Legislature 1779, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1792, Governor of Kentucky 1792–1796 1812–1816. Father-in-law of James Shannon.[38]
    • James Shannon (1791–1832), U.S. Chargé d'affaires to Central America 1832. Son-in-law of Isaac Shelby.[39]
      • Beriah Magoffin (1815–1885), Kentucky State Court Judge 1840, Kentucky State Senator 1850, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856, Governor of Kentucky 1859–1862, Kentucky State Representative 1867. Grandson-in-law of Isaac Shelby.[40]

NOTE: James Shannon was also brother of Kentucky State Representative George Shannon[41] and U.S. Representatives Thomas Shannon[42] and Wilson Shannon[43] and granduncle of U.S. Representative Isaac C. Parker.[44]

The Majors[edit]

  • Benjamin Porter Major, Missouri State Senator. Cousin of Samuel Collier Major.[45]
  • Samuel Collier Major (1840–1894), Missouri State Senator. Cousin of Benjamin Porter Major.[46]
    • Pryor J. Foree, Missouri State Representative. Second cousin once removed of Benjamin Porter Major and Samuel Collier Major.[47]
    • Samuel C. Major (1869–1931), Prosecuting Attorney of Howard County, Missouri; Missouri State Senator 1907–1911; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 1916; U.S. Representative from Missouri 1919–1921 1923–1929 1931. Son of Samuel Collier Major.[48]

The Mallorys[edit]

  • Stephen Mallory (1813–1873), U.S. Senator from Florida 1851–1861, Confederate States Secretary of the Navy 1861–1865. Father of Stephen Mallory II.[49]
    • Stephen Mallory II (1834–1907), Florida State Representative 1877–1879, Florida State Senator 1881–1889, U.S. Representative from Florida 1891–1895, U.S. Senator from Florida 1897–1907. Son of Stephen Mallory.[50]

The Malones and O'Gormans[edit]

  • James Aloysius O'Gorman (1860–1943), District Court Judge in New York 1893–1899, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1896 1912 1916, Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1900–1911, U.S. Senator from New York 1911–1917. Father-in-law of Dudley Field Malone.[51]
    • Dudley Field Malone (1882–1950), U.S. Collector of Customs of New York City 1913–1917, candidate for Governor of New York 1920, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1932. Son-in-law of James Aloysius O'Gorman.[52]

The Manchins[edit]

  • A. James Manchin (1927–2003), Secretary of State and State Treasurer of West Virginia. Member, West Virginia House of Delegates. Uncle of Joseph Manchin III.
    • Dr. Mark Anthony Manchin, Son of A. James Manchin, West Virginia State Senate, Superintendent, McDowell County Schools; School Building Authority Executive Director.
    • Tim Manchin (1955–), West Virginia House of Delegates, November 2003 – present
  • Joseph Manchin III (1947–), West Virginia House Delegate 1982–1986, West Virginia State Senator 1986–1996, candidate for Democratic nomination for Governor of West Virginia 1996, West Virginia Secretary of States 2001–2005, Governor of West Virginia 2005–2010, U.S. Senator from West Virginia 2010–present. Nephew of A. James Manchin.[53]
    • Gayle Manchin (1947–) Wife of Senator Joe Manchin, West Virginia Director of the AmeriCorps Promise Fellow Program, member of West Virginia State Board of Education.

The Manlys[edit]

  • Charles Manly (1795–1871), Governor of North Carolina 1849–1851. Brother of Matthias Evans Manly.[54]
  • Matthias Evans Manly (1801–1881), member of the North Carolina House of Commons, Judge of the North Carolina Superior Court, Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, North Carolina State Senator. Brother of Charles Manly.

The Manners and Pralls[edit]

  • John Manners (1786–1853), New Jersey State Senator 1850–1852. First cousin of David Stout Manners.[55]
  • David Stout Manners (1808–1884), Mayor of Jersey City, New Jersey 1952–1857. First cousin of John Manners.[56]
    • Horace Griggs Prall (1881–1951), New Jersey Assemblyman 1926–1927, New Jersey State Senator 1928–1936, acting Governor of New Jersey 1935. First cousin thrice removed of John Manners.[57]

The Mannings[edit]

  • James Burchill Richardson (1770–1836), Governor of South Carolina 1802–1804. Uncle of Richard Irvine Manning I and John Peter Richardson II.[58]
    • Richard Irvine Manning I (1789–1836), South Carolina State Representative 1820, South Carolina State Senator 1822, Governor of South Carolina 1824–1826, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1834–1836. Nephew of James Burchill Richardson.[59]
    • John Peter Richardson II (1801–1869), South Carolina State Representative 1825–1834, South Carolina State Senator 1834–1836, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1836–1839, Governor of South Carolina 1840–1842. Nephew of James Burchill Richardson.[60]
      • John Lawrence Manning (1816–1889), South Carolina State Representative 1842–1846 1865–1867, South Carolina State Senator 1846–1852 1861–1865, Governor of South Carolina 1852–1854. Son of Richard Irvine Manning I.[61]
      • John Peter Richardson III (1831–1899), South Carolina State Representative, South Carolina State Senator, Treasurer of South Carolina 1878–1886, Governor of South Carolina 1886–1890. Son of John Peter Richardson II.[62]
        • Richard Irvine Manning III (1859–1931), South Carolina State Representative 1892–1896, South Carolina State Senator 1898–1906, Governor of South Carolina 1915–1919. Nephew of John Lawrence Manning.[63]

The Mansfields[edit]

  • Frederick Mansfield (1877–1958), candidate for Governor of Massachusetts 1910 1916 1917, candidate for Treasurer of Massachusetts 1914, candidate for Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts 1929; Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts 1934–1937; Treasurer of Massachusetts 1941. Father of Walter R. Mansfield.[64]
    • Walter R. Mansfield (1911–1987), U.S. District Court Judge in New York 1966–1971, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1971–1981. Son of Frederick Mansfield.[65]

The Marchands[edit]

The Marins, Mendozas, and Riveras[edit]

  • Luis Munoz Rivera (1859–1916), Puerto Rico House Delegate 1906–1910, Resident Commissioner to the U.S. Congress from Puerto Rico 1911–1916. Father of Luis Muñoz Marín.
    • Luis Muñoz Marín (1898–1980), Puerto Rico Commonwealth Senator 1931–1937 1941–1949, Governor of Puerto Rico 1949–1965. Son of Luis Munoz Rivera.

The Markells[edit]

The Marshes[edit]

  • Charles Marsh (1765–1849), U.S. District Attorney of Vermont 1797–1801, U.S. Representative from Vermont 1815–1817. Father of George Perkins Marsh.[70]
    • George Perkins Marsh (1801–1882), Vermont Governor's Councilman 1835, U.S. Representative from Vermont 1843–1849, U.S. Minister to Turkey 1849–1853, U.S. Minister to Italy 1861–1882. Son of Charles Marsh.[71]

The Marshalls[edit]

  • Robert Morris (1734–1806), Delegate to the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania 1776, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1789–1795. Father-in-law of James Markham Marshall.[72]
  • Jaquelin Ambler (1742–1798), Treasurer of Virginia. Father-in-law of John Marshall.[73]
    • John Marshall (1755–1835), Virginia House Delegate 1782–1789, delegate to the 1788 Virginia Constitutional Convention, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1799–1800, U.S. Secretary of State 1800–1801, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court 1801–1835. Son-in-law of Jaquelin Ambler.[74]
    • James Markham Marshall (1764–1848), delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1791. Son-in-law of Robert Morris.[75]
    • Alexander Keith Marshall (17701-1825), Kentucky State Representative 1797–1801. Brother of John Marshall and James Markham Marshall.[76]
    • Humphrey Marshall (1760–1841), U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1795–1801. First cousin and brother-in-law of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[77]
      • Thomas Marshall (1784–1835), delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1829. Son of John Marshall.[78]
      • James Keith Marshall (1801–1862), Virginia State Senator. Son of John Marshall.[79]
      • Edward Colston (1786–1852), Virginia House Delegate 1812–1814 1816–1817 1823–1828 1833–1835, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1817–1819. Nephew of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[80]
      • Thomas A. Marshall (1794–1871), Kentucky State Representative 1827–1828 1863, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1831–1835, Judge of the Kentucky Court of Appeals 1835–1856, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals 1866–1867. Son of Humphrey Marshall.[81]
      • Thomas F. Marshall (1801–1864), Kentucky State Representative 1832–1836 1838–1839 1854, candidate for U.S. House of Representative from Kentucky 1836, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1841–1843. Nephew of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[82]
      • Alexander Keith Marshall (1808–1884), candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1847, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1855–1857. Nephew of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[83]
      • Alexander Keith McClung (1809–1855), U.S. Chargé d'affaires to Bolivia 1849–1851. Nephew of John Marshall.[84]
      • Charles Alexander Marshall, Kentucky State Representative 1840 1855 1859. Nephew of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[85]
      • Edward Colston Marshall (1821–1893), U.S. Representative from California 1851–1853, candidate for U.S. Senate from California 1856, candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1874, Attorney General of California 1883–1887. Nephew of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Alexander Keith Marshall.[86]
      • Jacquelin Burwell Harvie (1788–1856), Virginia State Senator. Son-in-law of John Marshall.[87]
        • Humphrey Marshall (1812–1872), U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1849–1852 1855–1859, U.S. Minister to China 1852–1854, Confederate States Representative from Kentucky 1864–1865. Grandson of Humphrey Marshall.[88]
        • John Augustine Marshall (1854–1941), Utah Territory Representative, U.S. District Court Judge in Utah 1896. Grandson of James Markham Marshall.[89]
          • John J. McAfee (1836–1896), Kentucky State Representative 1871–1873. Son-in-law of Humphrey Marshall.[90]

NOTE: Robert Morris was also father of U.S. Representative Thomas Morris.[91] John Marshall was also third cousin once removed of U.S. President Thomas Jefferson,[92] brother-in-law of U.S. Court of Appeals Judges William McClung,[93] George Keith Taylor,[94] and U.S. Attorney Joseph Hamilton Daveiss;[95] and cousin of U.S. Senator John Randolph.[96] Thomas Marshall was also second cousin of Virginia State Senator William Marshall Ambler.[97] Edward Colston was also son-in-law of Virginia House Delegate William Brockenbrough[98] and brother-in-law of U.S. Senator Benjamin Watkins Leigh.[99] Humphrey Marshall was also nephew of Kentucky and Alabama Legislator James G. Birney.[100]

The Marvins[edit]

The Mathias's[edit]

  • Charles M. Mathias, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1924. Father of Charles Mathias.[103]
    • Charles M. Mathias, Jr. (1922–2010), Maryland House Delegate 1959–1961, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1961–1969, U.S. Senator from Maryland 1969–1987, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Son of Charles M. Mathias.[104]

The Martins[edit]

  • Joshua L. Martin (1799–1856), Alabama State Representative 1822–1828, Solicitor of Alabama 1827–1831, Circuit Court Judge 1834, U.S. Representative from Alabama 1835–1839, Governor of Alabama 1845–1847. Father of John Mason Martin.[105]
    • John Mason Martin (1837–1898), Alabama State Senator 1871–1876, U.S. Representative from Alabama 1885–1887. Son of Joshua L. Martin.[106]

The Martins of Colorado and Oklahoma[edit]

  • John Andrew Martin (1868–1939), Colorado State Representative 1901, U.S. Representative from Colorado 1909–1913 1933–1939. Brother of Hugh Martin, Jr..
  • Hugh Martin, Jr., Sheriff of Woods County, Oklahoma. Brother of John Andrew Martin.

The Martins of Kentucky and Virginia[edit]

  • John Preston Martin (1811–1862), Kentucky State Representative 1841–1843, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1845–1847, Kentucky State Senator 1855–1859, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856. Brother of Elbert S. Martin.[107]
  • Elbert S. Martin (1829–1876), U.S. Representative from Virginia 1859–1861. Brother of John Preston Martin.[108]
    • George Brown Martin (1876–1945), Kentucky State Court Judge, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1918–1919, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1928. Grandson of John Preston Martin.[109]

The Martins and Owens[edit]

  • James B. Owens (1816–1889), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1860, Confederate States Provisional Congress Delegate from Florida 1861–1862. Grandfather of John W. Martin.[110]

NOTE: James B. Owens was also brother-in-law of U.S. Representative Ethelbert Barksdale.[112]

The Martins and Tillmans[edit]

  • Barclay Martin (1802–1890), Tennessee State Representative 1839–1840 1847–1849 1851–1853, Tennessee State Senator 1841–1843, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1845–1847. Uncle of Lewis Tillman.[113]
    • Lewis Tillman (1816–1886), Clerk of the Bedford County, Tennessee Circuit Court 1852–1860; Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court in Tennessee 1865–1869; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1869–1871. Nephew of Barclay Martin.[114]

The Martindales[edit]

  • Henry C. Martindale (1780–1860); Surrogate of Washington County, New York 1816–1819; District Attorney of Washington County, New York 1821–1828; U.S. Representative from New York 1823–1831 1833–1835. Father of John H. Martindale.
    • John H. Martindale (1815–1881), Governor of Washington, D.C. 1862–1864, Attorney General of New York 1866–1867. Son of Henry C. Martindale.

The Masons[edit]

Morgan Mason (1955–), Deputy Chief of Protocol of the United States 1981, Special Assistant to the President of the United States, 1981–1983. Father of James Duke Mason. James Duke Mason (1992–), Page in the U.S. House of Representatives, 2008.

The Masons of Virginia[edit]

  • George Mason (1725–1792), member of the Virginia Legislature 1759 1776–1780 1786–1788, delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention 1787 1788. Brother of Thomson Mason.[115]
  • Thomson Mason (1730–1785), Chief Justice of the Virginia Supreme Court. Brother of George Mason.[116]
    • Stevens Thomson Mason (1760–1803), member of the Virginia Legislature, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1794–1803. Son of Thomson Mason.[117]
    • John Thomson Mason (1765–1824), Attorney General of Maryland 1806. Son of Thomson Mason.[118]
      • Thomson F. Mason (1785–1838), Mayor of Alexandria, District of Columbia 1827–1830. Grandson of George Mason.[119]
      • Armistead T. Mason (1787–1819), U.S. Senator from Virginia 1816–1817. Son of Stevens Thomson Mason.[120]
      • John T. Mason (1787–1850), Secretary of Michigan Territory 1830–1831. Son of Stevens Thomson Mason.[121]
      • James M. Mason (1798–1871), Virginia House Delegate 1826, delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1829, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1837–1839, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1847–1861, Delegate to the Confederate States Provisional Congress from Virginia 1861, Confederate States Envoy to England 1861. Grandson of George Mason.[122]
      • John Thomson Mason, Jr. (1815–1873), Maryland House Delegate 1838–1839, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1841–1843, Judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals 1851–1857, U.S. Collector of Customs of Baltimore, Maryland 1857–1861; Maryland Secretary of State 1872–1873. Son of John Thomson Mason.[123]
        • Stevens T. Mason (1811–1843), Secretary of Michigan Territory 1831, Governor of Michigan Territory 1834–1835, Governor of Michigan 1835–1840. Son of John T. Mason.[124]
          • C. O'Conor Goolrick, Virginia House Delegate 1908, Virginia State Senator 1915 1923, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1924. Great-great-great-grandson of George Mason.[125]

NOTE: Armistead T. Mason and John T. Mason were also brothers-in-law of U.S. Representative Benjamin Howard[126] and U.S. Postmaster General William T. Barry.[127]

The Mathesons[edit]

The Mathews[edit]

The Mathews of Virginia[edit]

Main article: Mathews family

The Matthews and Wattersons[edit]

  • Thomas Stanley Matthews (1824–1889), Hamilton County, Ohio Court of Common Pleas Judge 1850–1852; Ohio State Senator 1856–1857; U.S. Attorney in Ohio 1858–1861; candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1876; U.S. Senator from Ohio 1877–1879; Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1881–1889. Uncle of Henry Watterson.[132]

NOTE: Thomas Stanley Matthews was also father-in-law of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Horace Gray.[134] Henry Watterson was also son of U.S. Representative Harvey Magee Watterson.[135]

The Matthews and Whitchombs[edit]

  • James Whitcomb (1795–1852), Indiana State Senator 1830–1836, Governor of Indiana 1843–1848, U.S. Senator from Indiana 1849–1852. Father-in-law of Claude Matthews.[136]
    • Claude Matthews (1845–1898), Indiana State Representative 1876, Indiana Secretary of State 1891–1893, Governor of Indiana 1893–1897. Son-in-law of James Whitcomb.[137]

The Mathias[edit]

  • Charles M. Mathias, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1924. Father of Charles Mathias.[103]
    • Charles Mathias (1922–), Maryland House Delegate 1959–1961, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1961–1969, U.S. Senator from Maryland 1969–1987, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Son of Charles M. Mathias.[104]

The Maurys and Mavericks[edit]

  • Abram Poindexter Maury, Sr., Tennessee State Senator. Father of Abram Poindexter Maury.
    • Abram Poindexter Maury (1801–1848), member of the Tennessee Legislature, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1835–1839. Son of Abram Poindexter Maury, Sr..
    • Maury Maverick (1895–1954), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1928 1940, U.S. Representative from Texas 1935–1939, Mayor of San Antonio, Texas 1939–1941. Cousin of Abram Poindexter Maury.[138]
      • Maury Maverick, Jr. (1921–2003), Texas State Representative 1950–1956, candidate for Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Texas 1961. Son of Maury Maverick.[139]

NOTE: Maury Maverick was also nephew of U.S. Representative James L. Slayden,[140] cousin of U.S. Representative John Wood Fishburne,[141] and grandson of Texas State Representative Samuel Maverick.[142]

The Maxeys[edit]

  • Rice Maxey (1800–1878), Texas State Senator 1861–1862. Father of Samuel B. Maxey.[143]
    • Samuel B. Maxey (1825–1895), Texas State Senator, candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 1872, U.S. Senator from Texas 1875–1887. Son of Rice Maxey.[144]

The Maxwells and Robesons[edit]

  • George C. Maxwell (1771–1816), U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1811–1813. Father of John Patterson Bryan Maxwell.[145]
    • John Patterson Bryan Maxwell (1804–1845), U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1837–1839 1841–1843. Son of George C. Maxwell.[146]
      • George M. Robeson (1829–1897), Attorney General of New Jersey 1867–1869, U.S. Secretary of the Navy 1869–1877, U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1879–1883. Nephew of John Patterson Bryan Maxwell.[147]

The Maybanks[edit]

  • Burnet R. Maybank (1899–1954), Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina 1931–1938; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1936 1940 1944; Governor of South Carolina 1939–1941; U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1941–1954. Father of Burnett R. Maybank II.[148]
    • Burnet R. Maybank II (1924–), South Carolina State Representative 1953–1958, Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina 1959–1961. Son of Burnet R. Maybank.[149]
      • Burnet R. Maybank III (1956–) Notable U.S. lawyer, head of the S.C. Tax Commission. Son of Burnet R. Maybank II.

The McBrides[edit]

  • James McBride (1802–1875), Oregon Territory Councilman, U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Hawaii 1863–1866. Father of John R. McBride, Thomas A. McBride, and George W. McBride.[150]
    • John R. McBride (1832–1904), delegate to the Oregon Constitutional Convention 1857, Oregon State Senator 1860–1862, U.S. Representative from Oregon 1863–1865, Chief Justice of the Idaho Territory, Republican National Committeeman 1880–1892. Son of James McBride.[151]
    • Thomas A. McBride (1847–1930), Clatsop County, Oregon Circuit Court Judge 1892–1909; Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court 1909–1930; Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court 1913–1915 1917–1921 1923–1927. Son of James McBride.[152]
    • George W. McBride (1854–1911), Oregon State Representative 1882, Oregon Secretary of State 1886 1895, U.S. Representative from Oregon 1895–1901. Son of James McBride.[153]

The McBrides and Sinks[edit]

The McCartys[edit]

  • Enoch McCarty (1783–1857), delegate to the Indiana Constitutional Convention 1816, Indiana State Senator 1832–1834, candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana 1833, Indiana State Representative 1835–1837, Judge in Indiana 1838–1845. Brother of Benjamin McCarty, Johnathan McCarty, and Abner McCarty.[156]
  • Benjamin McCarty (1792–1865), Probate Court Judge in Indiana 1832–1834, Indiana State Representative 1836–1837. Brother of Enoch McCarty, Johnathan McCarty, and Abner McCarty.[157]
  • Johnathan McCarty (1795–1852), Indiana State Representative 1818, Clerk of Fayette County, Indiana 1819–1827; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1831–1837. Brother of Enoch McCarty, Benjamin McCarty, and Abner McCarty.[158]
  • Abner McCarty, Indiana State Representative 1838–1839. Brother of Enoch McCarty, Benjamin McCarty, and Johnathan McCarty.[159]
    • William Monroe McCarty, Indiana State Senator 1847–1849, Circuit Court Judge in Indiana 1850–1853. Son of Enoch McCarty.[160]

The McCaskills[edit]

  • William Y. McCaskill, Insurance Commissioner of Missouri. Husband of Betty Anne McCaskill.
  • Betty Anne McCaskill, Columbia, Missouri Councilwoman. Wife of William Y. McCaskill.
    • Claire McCaskill (1953–), Missouri State Representative 1983–1989, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri 1992–1998; Auditor of Missouri 1998–2006; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2000 2008; candidate for Governor of Missouri 2004; U.S. Senator from Missouri 2007–present. Daughter of William Y. McCaskill and Betty Anne McCaskill.[161]

Claire (Clarence)Milton McCaskill, b. 1889, served as Mayor of Houston, Missouri. Father of William Y. McCaskill. William Jackson McCaskill,b. 1864, d. 1934, served as Sheriff of Texas County Missouri in 1916. Father of Claire Milton McCaskill

The McClellans[edit]

The McClungs[edit]

  • William McClung (1758–1811), Kentucky State Representative 1793, U.S. Attorney of Kentucky 1794–1796, Kentucky State Senator 1796–1800, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1801. Father of Alexander Keith McClung.[93]

NOTE: William McClung was also brother-in-law of U.S. Secretary of State John Marshall.[74]

The McCooks[edit]

NOTE: Edward M. McCook was also brother-in-law of U.S. Minister Charles Adams.[168]

The McCoppins and Van Ness[edit]

1823–1826, U.S. Minister to Spain 1829–1836. Father of James Van Ness.

    • James Van Ness (1808–1872), Mayor of San Francisco 1855–1856; California State Senator 1871. Son of Cornelius P. Van Ness.[169]
      • Frank McCoppin (1834–1897), Mayor of San Francisco, California 1867–1869. Son-in-law of James Van Ness.[170]

The McCormacks[edit]

  • John William McCormack (1891–1980), delegate to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention 1917 1918, Massachusetts State Representative 1920–1922, Massachusetts State Senator 1923–1926, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1928–1971, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representative 1963–1971, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1932 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964, Chairman of the Democratic National Convention 1964. Uncle of Edward McCormack, Jr.[171]
    • Edward McCormack, Jr. (1923–1997), Attorney General of Massachusetts 1958–1963, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960 1964, candidate for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Massachusetts 1962, candidate for Governor of Massachusetts 1966. Nephew of John William McCormack.[172]

The McCormicks[edit]

See McCormick family

The McCreerys[edit]

The McDowells[edit]

  • Joseph McDowell, Jr. (1756–1801), U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1797–1799. Cousin of Joseph McDowell.[175]
  • Joseph McDowell (1758–1799), U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1793–1795. Cousin of Joseph McDowell, Jr.[176]
    • Joseph J. McDowell (1800–1877), Ohio State Representative 1832, Ohio State Senator 1833, candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1840, U.S. Representative from Ohio 1843–1847. Son of Joseph McDowell, Jr.[177]

The McDuffies and Hamptons[edit]

  • George McDuffie (1790–1851), South Carolina State Representative 1818–1819, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1821–1834, Governor of South Carolina 1834–1836, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1842–1846. Father-in-law of Wade Hampton III.[178]
    • Wade Hampton III (1818–1902), South Carolina State Senator 1858, candidate for Governor of South Carolina 1865, Governor of South Carolina 1876–1879, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1879–1891. Son-in-law of George McDuffie.[179]

NOTE: Wade Hampton III was also grandson of U.S. Representative Wade Hampton I,[180] son-in-law of U.S. Representative Francis Preston,[181] and brother-in-law of U.S. Senator William Campbell Preston.[182]

The McEnerys[edit]

  • John McEnery (1833–1891), Governor of Louisiana 1873. Brother of Samuel D. McEnery.[183]
  • Samuel D. McEnery (1837–1910), Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana 1879, Governor of Louisiana 1881–1888, Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court 1888–1897, U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1897–1910. Brother of John McEnery.[184]

The McGuires and Nevilles[edit]

The McHenrys[edit]

  • John H. McHenry (1797–1871), Commonwealth Attorney in Kentucky, Kentucky State Representative 1840, candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1840, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1845–1847, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849, Kentucky Circuit Court Judge. Father of Henry D. McHenry.[187]
    • Henry D. McHenry (1826–1890), Kentucky State Representative 1851–1853 1865–1867, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1871–1873, Democratic National Committeeman 1872–1890. Son of John H. McHenry.[188]

The McKays[edit]

  • K. Gunn McKay (1925–2000), U.S. Representative from Utah 1971–1981. Brother of Monroe G. McKay.[189]
  • Monroe G. McKay (1928–), Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1977–1991, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1991–1993. Brother of K. Gunn McKay.[190]

The McKeans[edit]

The McKeithens[edit]

nomination for Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana 1952, Governor of Louisiana 1964–1972, candidate for U.S. Senate from Louisiana 1972. Father of W. Fox McKeithen.[193]

    • W. Fox McKeithen (1946–2005), Louisiana State Representative 1983–1987, Louisiana Secretary of State 1987–2005, delegate to the Republican National Convention 2004. Son of John McKeithen.[194]
      • Marjorie McKeithen (1965–), candidate for U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1998. Daughter of W. Fox McKeithen.[195]

The McKennans[edit]

  • Thomas McKean Thompson McKennan (1794–1852), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1831–1839 1842–1843, U.S. Secretary of the Interior 1850. Father of William McKennon.[196]
    • William McKennon (1816–1893), Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals 1869–1891. Son of Thomas McKean Thompson McKennan.[197]

The McKenzies and Moss[edit]

  • James A. McKenzie (1840–1904), Kentucky State Representative 1867–1871, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1877–1883, Kentucky State Representative 1884–1888, U.S. Minister to Peru 1893–1897. Uncle of J. McKenzie Moss.[198]
    • J. McKenzie Moss (1868–1929), U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1902–1903, Judge in Kentucky 1909–1921, Judge of Kentucky Court of Claims 1826–1929. Nephew of James A. McKenzie.[199]

The McKims[edit]

  • Alexander McKim (1748–1832), Maryland House Delegate 1778, Maryland State Senator 1806–1810, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1809–1815, Justice in Maryland. Uncle of Isaac McKim.[200]
    • Isaac McKim (1775–1835), Maryland State Senator 1821–1823, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1823–1825 1833–1835. Nephew of Alexander McKim.[201]

The McKinleys[edit]

  • David Allison McKinley (1829–1892), U.S. Consul to the Kingdom of Hawaii. Brother of William McKinley.
  • William McKinley (1843–1901), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1877–1891, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1884 1888, Governor of Ohio 1892–1896, President of the United States 1897–1901. Brother of David Allison McKinley.[202]

NOTE: William McKinley was also cousin of U.S. Ambassador Henry P. Fletcher.[203]

The McKinneys[edit]

  • James E. McKinney, Georgia State Representative. Father of Cynthia McKinney.[204]
    • Cynthia McKinney (1955–), Georgia State Representative 1989–1993, U.S. Representative from Georgia 1993–2003 2005–2007, candidate for President of the United States 2008. Daughter of James E. McKinney.[205]

The McKinneys of Connecticut[edit]

  • Stewart B. McKinney (1931–1987), Connecticut State Senator 1967–1971, U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1971–1987, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Father of John P. McKinney.[206]

The McKinnons[edit]

  • Clinton D. McKinnon (1906–2001), U.S. Representative from California 1949–1953, candidate for Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from California 1952, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952 1956. Father of Mike McKinnon and Clinton D. McKinnon.[208]
    • Mike McKinnon, Texas State Senator 1972–1976. Son of Clinton D. McKinnon.[209]
    • Clinton D. McKinnon, candidate for U.S. Representative from California. Son of Clinton D. McKinnon.[210]

The McLanes[edit]

  • Louis McLane (1786–1837), U.S. Representative from Delaware 1917–1927, U.S. Senator from Delaware 1927–1929, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1831–1833, U.S. Secretary of State 1833–1834. Father of Robert M. McLane.[211]
    • Robert M. McLane (1815–1898), Maryland House Delegate 1845–1847, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1847–1851 1879–1883, Commissioner to China 1853–1854, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Mexico 1859–1860, Governor of Maryland 1884–1885, Minister Plenipotentiary to France 1885–1889. Son of Louis McLane.[212]
      • Robert M. McLane (1867–1904), Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland 1903–1904. Nephew of Robert M. McLane.[213]

The McLeans[edit]

  • John McLean (1785–1861), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1813–1816, Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court 1816–1822, Commissioner of the General Land Office 1822–1823, U.S. Postmaster General 1823–1829, Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1830–1861. Brother of William McLean and Finis McLean.
  • William McLean (1794–1839), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1823–1829. Brother of John McLean and Finis McLean.
  • Finis McLean (1806–1881), Kentucky State Representative 1837, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1849–1851. Brother of John McLean and William McLean.
    • James D. Walker (1830–1906), Solicitor General of Arkansas, Presidential Elector 1876, U.S. Senator from Arkansas 1879–1885. Nephew of John McLean, William McLean, and Finis McLean.

NOTE: James D. Walker was also grandson of U.S. Representative David Walker,[214] grandnephew of U.S. Senator George Walker,[215] and cousin of U.S. Senator Wilkinson Call.[216]

The McMahons and Vallandighams[edit]

  • Clement Vallandigham (1820–1871), Ohio State Representative 1845–1846, U.S. Representative from Ohio 1858–1863. Uncle of John A. McMahon.[217]
    • John A. McMahon (1833–1923), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1875–1881. Nephew of Clement Vallandigham.[218]

The McNarys[edit]

  • John Hugh McNary (1867–1936), Deputy District Attorney of Third District of Oregon 1898–1904, District Attorney for Third District of Oregon 1905–1912, Judge for U.S. District Court of Oregon 1927–1936. Brother of Charles L. McNary.
  • Charles L. McNary (1874–1944), Marion County, Oregon Deputy Recorder 1892–1896, Deputy District Attorney for Third District of Oregon 1904–1911, Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court 1913–1915, U.S. Senator from Oregon 1917–1918 1919–1944. Brother of John Hugh McNary.

The McNichols[edit]

  • William H. McNichols, Auditor of Denver, Colorado. Father of William H. McNichols, Jr. and Stephen McNichols.[219]
    • William H. McNichols, Jr. (1910–1997), Mayor of Denver, Colorado 1968–1983. Son of William H. McNichols.
    • Stephen McNichols (1914–1997), Colorado State Senator 1945–1955, Lieutenant Governor of Colorado 1955–1957, Governor of Colorado 1957–1963, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960 1964, Democratic National Committeeman 1963, candidate for U.S. Senate from Colorado 1968. Son of William H. McNichols.[220]

The McNinches[edit]

The McRaes[edit]

  • Colin John McRae (1812–1877), member of the Mississippi Legislature 1838, Delegate to the Confederate States Provisional Congress from Alabama 1861–1862. Brother of John Jones McRae.[221]
  • John Jones McRae (1815–1868), Mississippi State Representative 1848–1850, U.S. Senator from Mississippi 1851–1852, Governor of Mississippi 1854–1857, U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1858–1861, Confederate States Representative from Mississippi 1862–1864. Brother of Colin John McRae.[221]

The Mechems[edit]

  • Merritt C. Mechem (1870–1946), New Mexico Territory Councilman 1909, District Court Judge in New Mexico 1911–1920, Governor of New Mexico 1921–1923. Uncle of Edward L. Mechem.[222]
    • Edwin L. Mechem (1912–2002), New Mexico State Representative 1947–1948, Governor of New Mexico 1951–1955 1957–1959 1961–1962, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1952, U.S. Senator from New Mexico 1962–1964, U.S. District Court Judge in New Mexico 1970. Nephew of Merritt C. Mechem.[223]

The Meeks[edit]

  • Carrie P. Meek (1926–), U.S. Representative from Florida 1993–2003. Mother of Kendrick Meek.[224]
    • Kendrick Meek (1966–), U.S. Representative from Florida 2003–present. Son of Carrie P. Meek.[225]
    • Leslie Meek (1965–), Administrative Law Judge in Washington, D.C. is married to U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek.[226]

The Mellons, Bruces, and Warners[edit]

See Mellon family.

  • Thomas Mellon (1813–1908), Common Pleas Court Judge in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1859–1869; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Councilman 1877–1886. Father of Andrew W. Mellon.[227]
    • Andrew W. Mellon (1855–1937), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1921–1932, U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom 1932–1933. Son of Thomas Mellon.[228]
      • David K.E. Bruce (1898–1977), Maryland House Delegate 1924–1926, U.S. Vice Consul in Rome, Italy 1926; Virginia House Delegate 1939–1942; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940; U.S. Ambassador to France 1949–1952; U.S. Ambassador to Germany 1957–1959; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain 1961–1969; U.S. Liaison to China 1973–1974. Son-in-law of Andrew W. Mellon.[229]
        • John Warner (1927–), U.S. Secretary of the Navy 1972–1974, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1979–2009. Former grandson-in-law of Andrew W. Mellon.

NOTE: David K.E. Bruce was also son of U.S. Senator William Cabell Bruce[230] and brother of U.S. Ambassador James Bruce.[231]

The Mercers and Garnetts[edit]

  • George Mason (1725–1792), delegate to the Virginia Convention 1776. Cousin of James Mercer and John Francis Mercer.
  • James Mercer (1736–1793), member of the Virginia House of Burgesses 1765, Virginia Assemblyman 1774, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1779, Judge in Virginia. Cousin of George Mason.
  • John Francis Mercer (1759–1821), U.S. Representative from Maryland 1792–1794, Governor of Maryland 1801–1803. Cousin of George Mason.
    • Charles F. Mercer (1778–1858), Virginia House Delegate 1810–1817, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1817–1839. Son of James Mercer.
    • James M. Garnett (1770–1843), Virginia House Delegate 1800–1801 1824–1825, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1805–1809, delegate to the Constitutional Convention 1829. Nephew of James Mercer and John Francis Mercer.
    • Robert S. Garnett (1789–1840), Virginia House Delegate 1816–1817, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1817–1827. Nephew of James Mercer and John Francis Mercer.
    • Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (1809–1887), Virginia House Delegate 1835–1837, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1837–1843 1845–1847, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representative 1839–1841, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1847–1861, candidate for Democratic nomination for President of the United States 1860, Confederate States Representative from Virginia 1861–1862, Confederate States Secretary of State 1861–1862, Confederate States Senator from Virginia 1862–1865, Treasurer of Virginia 1874–1880. Nephew of James Mercer and John Francis Hunter.
      • Muscoe Russell Hunter Garnett (1821–1864), delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1850 1851 1861, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952 1856, Virginia House Delegate 1853–1856, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1856–1861, Confederate States Representative from Virginia 1862–1864. Grandson of James M. Garnett.[232]

The Merediths and Morrises[edit]

  • Gouvernor Morris (1752–1816), member of the New York Provincial Congress 1777, Delegate to the Continental Congress 1787, Assistant Superintendent of Finance of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1781–1785; Delegate to the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania 1787; U.S. Minister Plenipotentiary to France 1792–1794; U.S. Senator from New York 1800–1803. Granduncle of William M. Meredith.
    • William M. Meredith (1799–1873), Pennsylvania Assemblyman 1824–1828, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1849–1850, Attorney General of Pennsylvania 1861–1867. Grandnephew of Gouverneur Morris.

The Meriwethers[edit]

  • David Meriwether (1755–1822), Georgia State Representative 1797–1800, U.S. Representative from Georgia 1802–1807. Father of James Meriwether.[233]
    • James Meriwether (1789–1854), Georgia State Representative 1821–1823, U.S. Representative from Georgia 1825–1827. Son of David Meriwether.[234]
    • David Meriwether (1800–1893), member of the Kentucky Legislature 1832, candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1847 1851, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849, Kentucky Secretary of State 1851–1852, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1852, Governor of New Mexico Territory 1853–1857, Kentucky State Representative 1858–1885. Nephew of David Meriwether.[235]
      • James Archibald Meriwether (1806–1852), Georgia State Representative 1831–1836 1838, Superior Court Judge in Georgia 1845–1849, U.S. Representative from Georgia 1841–1843. Nephew of James Meriwether.[236]

NOTE: David Meriwether was also cousin by marriage of U.S. President Franklin Pierce.[237]

The Merricks[edit]

  • William Duhurst Merrick (1793–1857), Maryland House Delegate 1832–1838 1856–1857, U.S. Senator from Maryland 1838–1845, delegate to the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1850. Father of William Matthew Merrick.[238]
    • William Matthew Merrick (1818–1889), Justice of the District of Columbia Circuit Court 1854–1863, delegate to the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1867, Maryland House Delegate 1870, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1871–1873, Justice of the District of Columbia Supreme Court 1885–1889. Son of William Duhurst Merrick.[239]

The Merrimons and Overmans[edit]

  • Augustus Summerfield Merrimon (1830–1892), member of the North Carolina House of Commons 1860–1861, Solicitor in North Carolina 1861–1865, North Carolina Superior Court Judge 1866–1867, candidate for Governor of North Carolina 1872, U.S. Senator from North Carolina 1873–1879, Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court 1883–1889, Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court 1889–1892. Father-in-law of Lee Slater Overman.[240]
    • Lee Slater Overman (1854–1930), U.S. Senator from North Carolina 1903–1930. Son-in-law of Augustus Summerfield Merrimon.[241]

The Merritts[edit]

  • Edwin A. Merritt (1828–1916), New York Assemblyman 1860–1861, delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention 1867 1868, candidate for Treasurer of New York 1875, U.S. Collector of Customs of New York City 1878–1881, U.S. Consul General in London, England 1882–1885. Father of Edwin A. Merritt.[242]
    • Edwin A. Merritt (1860–1914), New York Assemblyman 1902–1912, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1912, U.S. Representative from New York 1912–1914. Son of Edwin A. Merritt.[243]

The Metcalfes[edit]

  • Richard L. Metcalfe (1861–1954), candidate for U.S. Senate from Nebraska 1928, Mayor of Omaha, Nebraska 1930–1933; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1932. Father of Theodore W. Metcalfe.[244]
    • Theodore W. Metcalfe (1894–1973), Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska 1931–1933, candidate for U.S. Representative from Nebraska 1940, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1952 1960. Son of Richard L. Metcalfe.[245]

The Metzenbaums and Hyatts[edit]

The Meyers[edit]

  • Jan Meyers (1928–), U.S. Representative from Kansas 1985–1997. Mother of Phil Meyers.
    • Phil Meyers, candidate for U.S. Representative from Hawaii 2000. Son of Jan Meyers.

The Meyners and Stevensons[edit]

  • William Stevenson (1900–1985), U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines 1961–1964. Father of Helen Stevenson Meyner.[249]
    • Helen Stevenson Meyner (1928–1997), candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1972, U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1975–1979, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1980. Daughter of William Stevenson.[250]
    • Robert B. Meyner (1908–1990), New Jersey State Senator 1948–1951, Governor of New Jersey 1954–1962, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1956. Husband of Helen Stevenson Meyner.[251]

NOTE: Helen Stevenson Meyner was also distant cousin of Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson II.

The Micas[edit]

  • John Mica (1943–), Florida State Representative, U.S. Representative from Florida 1993–present. Brother of Daniel A. Mica.[252]
  • Daniel A. Mica (1944–), U.S. Representative from Florida 1979–1989. Brother of John Mica.[253]

The Mickelsons[edit]

  • George T. Mickelson (1903–1965), South Dakota State Representative 1937–1941, Attorney General of South Dakota 1943–1947, Governor of South Dakota 1947–1951, U.S. District Court Judge in South Dakota. Father of George S. Mickelson.[254]

The Middleton, Rutledges, and Pickneys[edit]

See Middleton-Rutledge-Pinckney Family

The Millards[edit]

The Millers[edit]

  • George Miller, Jr. (1917–1968), California State Senator, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952 1956 1960 1964. Father of George Miller III.[258]
    • George Miller III (1945–), U.S. Representative from California 1975–present. Son of George Miller, Jr.[259] Patricia l. Miller {Senator}

The Millers of California and Delaware[edit]

  • Charles R. Miller (1857–1927), Delaware State Senator 1911–1912, Governor of Delaware 1913–1917. Father of Thomas W. Miller.[260]
    • Thomas W. Miller (1886–1973), Delaware Secretary of State 1913–1915, U.S. Representative from Delaware 1915–1917. Son of Charles R. Miller.[261]
      • Clement Woodnutt Miller (1916–1962), candidate for U.S. Representative from California 1956, U.S. Representative from California 1959–1962. Grandson of Charles R. Miller.[262]

The Millers of California, Indiana, and Washington[edit]

The Millers of Georgia[edit]

  • Stephen Grady Miller (1891–1932), Georgia State Senator 1926–1928. Father of Zell Miller.[265]
    • Zell Miller (1932–), Mayor of Young Harris, Georgia 1959–1961; Georgia State Senator 1961–1965; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1972 2000; Lieutenant Governor of Georgia 1975–1981; Governor of Georgia 1991–1999; U.S. Senator from Georgia 2000–2005. Son of Stephen Grady Miller.[266]

The Millers of Kentucky[edit]

  • Shackelford Miller, Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals. Father of Shackelford Miller, Jr. and Neville Miller.
    • Shackelford Miller, Jr. (1892–1965), U.S. District Court Judge in Kentucky 1939–1945, Judge of the U.S Court of Appeals 1945–1965. Son of Shackelford Miller.
    • Neville Miller (1894–1977), Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky 1933–1937; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1936. Son of Shackelford Miller.

The Millers of New York[edit]

  • Morris S. Miller (1779–1824), President of Utica, New York 1808; Judge of Court of Common Pleas of Oneida County, New York 1810–1824; U.S. Representative from New York 1813–1815. Father of Rutger B. Miller.[267]
    • Rutger B. Miller (1805–1877), Utica, New York Alderman; New York Assemblyman 1832; Clerk of U.S. District Court 1832–1833; U.S. Representative from New York 1836–1837. Son of Morris S. Miller.[268]

The Millers of New York (II)[edit]

  • William E. Miller (1914–1983), U.S. Representative from New York 1951–1965, Chairman of the Republican National Committee 1961–1964, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1964. Father of William E. Miller, Jr..
    • William E. Miller, Jr., candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 1992 1994. Son of William E. Miller.

The Millers of Pennsylvania[edit]

  • Jesse Miller (1800–1850), Sheriff of Perry County, Pennsylvania 1823–1826; Pennsylvania State Representative 1826–1828; Pennsylvania State Senator 1828–1832; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1833–1836; Pennsylvania Secretary of State 1845–1848. Father of William Henry Miller.[269]
    • William Henry Miller (1829–1870), Clerk of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court 1854–1863, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1863–1865, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1864. Son of Jesse Miller.[270]

The Millikens[edit]

  • James W. Milliken, Michigan State Senator 1898–1900. Father of James T. Milliken.[271]
    • James T. Milliken (1882–1952), Mayor of Traverse City, Michigan; candidate for Republican nomination for Michigan State Senate 1926 1932; Michigan State Senator 1941–1950. Son of James W. Milliken.[272]
      • William G. Milliken (1922–), Michigan State Senator 1961–1964, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan 1965–1969, Governor of Michigan 1969–1982, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Son of James T. Milliken.[273]

The Miltons[edit]

  • John Milton (1740–1804), Georgia Secretary of State 1777–1799. Father of John Milton.[274]
    • John Milton (1807–1865), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1860, Governor of Florida 1861–1865. Son of John Milton.[275]
      • William Hall Milton (1864–1942), candidate for Governor of Florida 1900 1912, member of the Florida Legislature, U.S. Senator from Florida 1908–1909. Son of John Milton.[276]
        • William Yates Atkinson (1854–1899), Georgia State Representative 1886–1894, Georgia Democratic Party Chairman 1890–1892, Governor of Georgia 1894–1898. Grandson-in-law of John Milton.[277]
          • William Y. Atkinson, Jr. (1887–1953), Georgia Democratic Chairman 1942, Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court 1943–1948. Son of William Yates Atkinson.[278]

The Mitchells[edit]

  • Alexander Mitchell (1817–1887), U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 1871–1875. Father of John L. Mitchell.[279]
    • John L. Mitchell (1842–1904), U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 1891–1893, U.S. Senator from Wisconsin 1893–1899. Son of Alexander Mitchell.[280]

The Mitchells of Arizona[edit]

  • W.W. Mitchell, member of the Arizona Legislature. Grandfather of Harry Mitchell and Robert Mitchell.
    • Harry Mitchell (1940–), Tempe, Arizona Councilman 1970–1978; Mayor of Tempe, Arizona 1978–1994; Arizona State Senator 1999–2007; Chairman of the Arizona Democratic Party; U.S. Representative from Arizona 2007–2011. Grandson of Mitchell.
    • Robert Mitchell, Mayor of Casa Grande, Arizona 1993–2001; Casa Grande, Arizona Councilman 2001–2004. Grandson of W.W. Mitchell.
      • Mark Mitchell, Tempe, Arizona Councilman 2000-2012; Vice Mayor of Tempe, Arizona 2004–2006; Mayor of Tempe, Arizona 2012–Present. Son of Harry Mitchell.[281]

The Mitchells of Maryland[edit]

  • Parren Mitchell (1922–2007), U.S. Representative from Maryland 1971–1987. Uncle of Clarence M. Mitchell III and Michael B. Mitchell.[282]
    • Clarence M. Mitchell III (1939–), Baltimore, Maryland Councilman; Maryland House Delegate 1963–1967; Maryland State Senator 1967–1986. Nephew of Parren Mitchell.[283]
    • Michael B. Mitchell (1945–), Baltimore, Maryland Councilman; Maryland State Senator 1987. Nephew of Parren Mitchell.[284]
      • Keiffer J. Mitchell, Jr. (1967–), Baltimore, Maryland Councilman 1995–2007; candidate for Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland 2007. Nephew of Clarence M. Mitchell III.[285]
      • Clarence M. Mitchell IV, Maryland State Senator. Son of Clarence M. Mitchell III.[286]

The Mitchells of Minnesota[edit]

  • William B. Mitchell (1832–1900), Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court 1881–1899. Father of William D. Mitchell.[287]
    • William D. Mitchell (1874–1955), Solicitor General of the United States 1925–1929, Attorney General of the United States 1929–1933. Son of William B. Mitchell.[288]

The Moffats[edit]

  • Seth Low (1850–1916), Mayor of Brooklyn, New York 1882–1885; candidate for Mayor of New York City 1897; Mayor of New York City 1902–1903; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1908; delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention 1915. Uncle of Seth Low Pierrepont and A. Augustus Low.[289]
    • Seth Low Pierrepont (1884–1956), Connecticut State Representative 1921–1927. Nephew of Seth Low.[290]
    • A. Augustus Low (1889–1963), Chairman of the Hamilton County, New York Republican Party 1930–1942; delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention 1938. Nephew of Seth Low.[291]
      • Jay Pierrepont Moffat (1896–1943), U.S. Consul in Sydney 1935–1937; U.S. Minister to Canada 1940–1943. Nephew of Seth Low Pierrepont.[292]
      • Abbot Low Moffat (1901–1996), New York Assemblyman 1929–1943. Nephew of Seth Low Pierrepont.[293][294]
        • Jay P. Moffat (1932–), U.S. Ambassador to Chad 1985–1987. Son of Jay Pierrepont Moffat.[295]
        • William Tapley Bennett Jr. (1917–1994), U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic 1964–1966, U.S. Ambassador to Portugal 1966–1969. Nephew by marriage of Jay Pierrepont Moffat and Abram Low Moffat.[296]

NOTE: Seth Low was also son-in-law of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Benjamin R. Curtis.[297] Jay Pierrepont Moffat was also son-in-law of U.S. Ambassador Joseph Grew. Moffat and Abbot Low Moffat were also brother-in-law of U.S. Ambassador John Campbell White.[298]

The Molinaris[edit]

  • S. Robert Molinari (1897–1957), New York Assemblyman 1943–1944. Father of Guy Molinari.[299]
    • Guy Molinari (1928–), New York Assemblyman 1974–1980, delegate to the New York Republican Convention 1979, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1980 1984, U.S. Representative from New York 1981–1989, President of Staten Island 1990–2001, candidate for District Attorney of Richmond County, New York 1995. Son of S. Robert Molinari.[300]
      • Susan Molinari (1958–), New York City Councilwoman 1986–1990, U.S. Representative from New York 1990–1997. Daughter of Guy Molinari.[301]
      • L. William Paxon (1954–), member of the Erie County, New York Legislature 1878–1982; New York Assemblyman 1983–1989; U.S. Representative from New York 1989–1999. Husband of Susan Molinari.[302]

The Mollohans[edit]

  • Robert H. Mollohan (1909–1999), U.S. Marshal in West Virginia 1950, U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1953–1957 1969–1983. Father of Alan Mollohan.[303]
    • Alan Mollohan (1943–), U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1983–present. Son of Robert H. Mollohan.[304]

The Mondales[edit]

  • Walter Mondale (1928–), Attorney General of Minnesota 1960–1964, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960 1964 1996 2000 2004 2008, U.S. Senator from Minnesota 1964–1976, Vice President of the United States 1977–1981, candidate for President of the United States, 1984, Chairman of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs 1986–1993, U.S Ambassador to Japan 1993–1996, candidate for U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 2002. Father of Theodore A. Mondale.[305]
    • Theodore A. Mondale (1957–), Minnesota State Senator 1991–1996, candidate for Democratic nominations for Governor of Minnesota, 1998, member of the Metropolitan Council 1999–2003. Son of Walter Mondale.[306]

The Moneys and Vardamans[edit]

  • Hernando Money (1839–1912), U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1875–1885, U.S. Senator from Mississippi 1897–1911. Cousin of James K. Vardaman.[307]
  • James K. Vardaman (1861–1930), Mississippi State Representative 1890–1896, candidate for Governor of Mississippi 1895 1899, Governor of Mississippi 1904–1908, U.S. Senator from Mississippi 1913–1919. Cousin of Hernando Money.

The Monroes and Alsops[edit]

  • Joseph Jones (1727–1805), delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1776, member of the Virginia Legislature 1776, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1777, Virginia State Court Judge 1778. Uncle of James Monroe.[308]
    • James Monroe (1758–1831), Governor of Virginia 1799–1802 1811, U.S. Secretary of War 1814–1815, U.S. Secretary of State 1811–1814 1815–1817, President of the United States 1817–1825. Nephew of Joseph Jones.[309]
    • Thomas B. Monroe (1791–1865), Kentucky State Representative 1816, Kentucky Secretary of State 1823–1824, U.S. District Court Judge in Kentucky 1834–1861, Delegate to the Confederate States Provisional Congress from Kentucky 1861–1862. Distant cousin of James Monroe.[310]
      • James Monroe (1799–1870), U.S. Representative from New York 1839–1841, New York Assemblyman 1850 1852. Nephew of James Monroe.[311]
      • Samuel L. Gouverneur (1799–1867), member of the New York state legislature, Postmaster of New York City 1828–1836. Nephew by marriage and son-in-law of James Monroe.
        • Samuel Laurence Gouverneur, Jr., U.S. Consul to Foo Chow, China. Son of Samuel L. Gouverneur.[312]
          • Theodore D. Robinson (1883–1934), New York Assemblyman 1912, New York State Senator 1922. Great-great-grandnephew of James Monroe.[313]
          • Corinne R. Alsop (1886–1971), Connecticut State Representative 1925, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1936, member of the Connecticut Republican Committee 1940. Great-great-grandniece of James Monroe.[314]
          • Joseph Wright Alsop (1876–1953), Connecticut State Representative 1907–1909, Connecticut State Senator 1909–1913, member of the Connecticut Republican Committee 1909–1912. Husband of Corinne R. Alsop.[315]
            • John Alsop (1915–2000), Connecticut State Representative 1947–1949, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1952 1960 1972, candidate for Governor of Connecticut 1962. Son of Corinne R. Alsop and Joseph Wright Alsop.[316]

NOTE: Theodore D. Robinson and Corinne R. Alsop were also niece and nephew of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, first cousins of Puerto Rico Governor Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and first cousins by marriage of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Nicholas Longworth. Joseph Wright Alsop was also son of Connecticut State Senator Joseph W. Alsop.[317]

The Montgomerys[edit]

  • John Montgomery (1722–1808), Pennsylvania State Representative 1782–1783, Delegate the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania 1782–1784, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania Judge 1794. Father of John Montgomery.[318]
    • John Montgomery (1764–1828), Maryland House Delegate 1793–1798 1800–1805 1819, Maryland State Attorney 1793–1796, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1807–1811, Attorney General of Maryland 1811–1818, Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland 1820–1822 1824–1826. Son of John Montgomery.[319]

The Moodys[edit]

  • Blair Moody (1902–1954), U.S. Senator from Michigan 1951–1952, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952, candidate for U.S. Senate from Michigan 1954, died during campaign. Father of Blair Moody, Jr.[320]
    • Blair Moody, Jr., Wayne County, Michigan Circuit Court Judge 1966–1969; candidate for Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court 1974; Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court 1977–1982. Son of Blair Moody.[321]

The Moodys of Oregon[edit]

  • Zena Ferry Moody (1832–1917), Governor of Oregon 1882–1887. Father of Malcolm Moody and Ralph E. Moody.
    • Malcolm Moody (1854–1925), The Dalles, Oregon Councilman; Mayor of The Dalles, Oregon; U.S. Representative from Oregon 1899–1903. Son of Zena Ferry Moody.
    • Ralph E. Moody, Oregon State Representative. Son of Zena Ferry Moody.

The Moores[edit]

  • Arch A. Moore, Jr. (1923–), U.S. Representative from West Virginia 1957–1969, Governor of West Virginia 1969–1977 1985–1989, candidate for U.S. Senate from West Virginia 1978. Father of Shelley Moore Capito.[322]

The Moores of Alabama[edit]

  • Gabriel Moore (1785–1845), Alabama Territory Representative 1817, delegate to the Alabama Constitutional Convention 1819, Alabama State Senator 1819–1820, U.S. Representative from Alabama 1821–1829, Governor of Alabama 1829–1831, U.S. Senator from Alabama 1831–1837. Brother of Samuel B. Moore.[324]
  • Samuel B. Moore (1789–1846), Alabama State Representative, Alabama State Senator, Governor of Alabama 1831, Judge of the Pickens County, Alabama Court 1835–1841. Brother of Gabriel Moore.[325]

The Moores of North Carolina and South Carolina[edit]

The Moores of Virginia[edit]

  • Andrew Moore (1752–1821), Virginia House Delegate 1780–1783 1785–1788 1799–1800, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1797 1804, Virginia State Senator 1800–1801, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1804–1809, U.S. Marshal of Virginia 1810–1821. Father of Samuel M. Moore.[327]
    • Samuel M. Moore (1796–1875), member of the Virginia Legislature, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1833–1835. Son of Andrew Moore.[328]

The Moores and Spinners[edit]

  • Francis E. Spinner (1802–1890), U.S. Representative from New York 1855–1861. Grandfather of T. Channing Moore.[329]
    • T. Channing Moore, New York Assemblyman 1920–1926 1929. Grandson of Francis E. Spinner.[330]

The Morans[edit]

  • James P. Moran (1945–), Alexandria, Virginia Councilman 1979–1982; Vice Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia 1982–1984; Mayor of Alexandria, Virginia 1985–1990; U.S. Representative from Virginia 1991–present. Brother of Brian Moran.[331]
  • Brian Moran (1959–), Virginia House Delegate 1995–2008, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2004, current candidate for 2009 Democratic nomination for Governor of Virginia. Brother of James P. Moran.[332]

The Morgenthaus[edit]

  • Henry Morgenthau, Sr. (1856–1946), Financial Chairman of the Democratic Party 1912 1916, U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire 1913–1916. Father of Henry Morgenthau, Jr.[333]
    • Henry Morgenthau, Jr. (1891–1967), Chair of the New York State Agricultural Advisory Committee 1929–1933, Governor of the Federal Farm Board 1933–1934, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1934–1945. Son of Henry Morgenthau, Sr.[334]
      • Robert M. Morgenthau (1919–), U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York 1961–1962 1962–1969, candidate for Governor of New York 1962, Deputy Mayor of New York City 1969–1970, candidate for the Democratic nomination for Governor of New York 1970, District Attorney for New York County, New York 1975–present. Son of Henry Morgenthau, Jr.[335]

NOTE: Robert M. Morgenthau is also grandnephew of U.S. Senator Herbert H. Lehman[336] and cousin of U.S. Ambassador John Langeloth Loeb.[337]

The Moreheads[edit]

  • John Motley Morehead (1796–1866), member of the North Carolina House of Commons 1821 1826–1827 1838, Governor of North Carolina 1841–1845, Delegate to the Confederate States Provisional Congress from North Carolina 1861–1862. Cousin of James T. Morehead.[338]
  • James T. Morehead (1797–1854), Kentucky State Representative 1828–1831 1837–1838, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky 1832–1834, Governor of Kentucky 1834–1836, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1841–1847. Cousin of John Motley Morehead.[339]
  • Charles S. Morehead (1802–1868), Kentucky State Representative 1828, Attorney General of Kentucky 1832–1838, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1847–1851, Governor of Kentucky 1855–1859. First cousin of James T. Morehead.[340]
    • William Waightstill Avery (1816–1864), member of the North Carolina Legislature 1842, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1860, Delegate to the Confederate State Provisional Congress from North Carolina 1861–1862. Son-in-law of John Motley Morehead.[341]

The Morials[edit]

  • Ernest Nathan Morial (1929–1989), Louisiana State Representative 1968–1970, Louisiana Juvenile Court Judge 1970–1974, Judge of the Louisiana Court of Appeals 1974–1978, Mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana 1978–1986. Father of Marc Morial.[342]
    • Marc Morial (1958–), candidate for U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1990, Louisiana State Senator 1992–1994, Mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana 1994–2002; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2000. Son of Ernest Nathan Morial.[343]

The Moriartys, Minors, and Pellys[edit]

  • Thomas T. Minor (1844–1889), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1880, Mayor of Port Townsend, Washington 1881; Mayor of Seattle, Washington 1887–1888. Grandfather of Thomas M. Pelly.[344]
    • Charles P. Moriarty, U.S. Attorney in Washington 1953–1961. Father of Charles Moriarty, Jr.[345]
    • Thomas M. Pelly (1902–1973), U.S. Representative from Washington 1953–1973. Father-in-law of Charles Moriarty, Jr.[346]
      • Charles Moriarty, Jr. (1928–1999), Washington State Representative 1957–1959, Washington State Senator 1959–1966. Son of Charles P. Moriarty.[347]

The Morrills[edit]

  • Anson P. Morrill (1803–1887), Postmaster of Kennebec County, Maine 1825–1841; Maine State Representative 1833 1880; Sheriff of Somerset County, Maine 1839; candidate for Governor of Maine 1853; Governor of Maine 1855–1861; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1856; U.S. Representative from Maine 1861–1863. Brother of Lot M. Morrill.[348]
  • Lot M. Morrill (1813–1883), Maine State Senator 1854–1856, Governor of Maine 1858–1861, U.S. Senator from Maine 1861–1876, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1876–1877. Brother of Anson P. Morrill.[349]

The Morris of Morrisania and New Jersey[edit]

  • Lewis Morris (1671–1746), Chief Justice of New York Colony, acting Governor of New York, Governor of New Jersey Colony. Father of Robert Hunter Morris.[350]
    • Robert Hunter Morris (1700–1764), Chief Justice of the New Jersey Colony Supreme Court, Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania Colony 1754–1756. Son of Lewis Morris.
      • Lewis Morris (1726–1798), Delegate to the Continental Congress from New York 1775–1777, Judge of Westchester County, New York 1777; New York State Senator 1777–1781 1784–1788; delegate to the New York Constitutional Convention 1788. Nephew of Robert Hunter Morris.
      • Gouverneur Morris (1752–1816), New York Colony Congressman 1775–1777, member of the New York Council of Safety 1777, New York Assemblyman 1777–1778, Delegate to the Continental Congress from New York 1778–1779, U.S. Minister to France 1792–1794, U.S. Senator from New York 1800–1803. Nephew of Robert Hunter Morris.
      • William Paterson (1745–1806), New Jersey Colony Congressman 1775–1776, member of the New Jersey Legislature 1776–1777, Delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey 1776, Attorney General of New Jersey 1776–1783, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1789–1790, Governor of New Jersey 1790–1793, Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1793–1806. Cousin by marriage of Lewis Morris.
        • Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839), New York Assemblyman 1789–1791, New York State Senator 1791–1796, Lieutenant Governor of New York 1795–1801, candidate for Governor of New York 1813. Son-in-law of William Paterson.[351]
        • Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer (1767–1824), Mayor of Albany, New York 1799–1812. Brother of Stephen Van Rensselaer III.
        • Lewis R. Morris (1760–1825), Clerk of Windsor County, Vermont 1789–1796; Judge in Windsor County, Vermont; Vermont State Representative 1790–1791 1795–1797 1803–1808; U.S. Representative from Vermont 1797–1803. Nephew of Lewis Morris and Gouverneur Morris.[352]
        • John Rutherfurd (1760–1840), New Jersey Assemblyman 1788–1790, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1791–1798. Son-in-law of Lewis Morris.
          • William M. Meredith (1799–1873), Pennsylvania Assemblyman 1824–1825, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Councilman 1834–1849; U.S. Attorney in Pennsylvania; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1849–1850; Attorney General of Pennsylvania 1861–1867. Grandnephew of Gouverneur Morris.
          • Henry Bell Van Rensselaer (1810–1864), U.S. Representative from New York 1841–1843. Son of Stephen Van Rensselaer III.[353]
            • Robert Walter Rutherfurd, member of the New Jersey Legislature. Son of John Rutherfurd.

NOTE: Gouverneur Morris was also a relative of U.S. Ambassador Wymberley DeRenne Coerr.[354] John Rutherfurd was also of some relation to Northwest Territory Governor Arthur St. Clair.

The Morris of Illinois and Ohio[edit]

  • Thomas Morris (1776–1844), Ohio State Representative 1806–1807 1808–1809 1810–1811 1820–1821, Ohio State Senator 1813–1915 1823–1825 1825–1829 1831–1833, Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court 1809–1810, U.S. Senator from Ohio 1833–1839, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1838. Father of Jonathan D. Morris and Isaac N. Morris.[355]

The Morris of Pennsylvania and New York[edit]

  • Robert Morris (1734–1806), member of the Pennsylvania Colony Council of Safety 1775, Pennsylvania Colony Assemblyman 1775–1776, member of the Pennsylvania Legislature 1776–1778, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania 1775–1778, delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention 1787, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1789–1795. Father of Thomas Morris.[358]
    • Thomas Morris (1771–1849), New York State Senator 1794–1796, U.S. Representative from New York 1801–1803, U.S. Marshal of New York 1816 1820 1825 1829. Son of Robert Morris.[359]

The Morris of Ohio[edit]

  • Joseph Morris (1795–1854), Sheriff of Greene County, Ohio 1824; Treasurer of Monroe County, Ohio; Ohio State Representative 1833–1834; U.S. Representative from Ohio 1843–1847. Father of James R. Morris.[360]
    • James R. Morris (1819–1899), Treasurer of Monroe County, Ohio; Ohio State Representative 1848; U.S. Representative from Ohio 1861–1865; Probate Court Judge in Ohio 1872–1877; Postmaster in Ohio 1886–1889. Son of Joseph Morris.[361]

The Morrisons[edit]

  • Frank B. Morrison (1905–2004), Chairman of the Frontier County, Nebraska Democratic Party 1940; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1956; candidate for U.S. Representative from Nebraska 1948 1954; candidate for U.S. Senate from Nebraska 1958 1966 1970; Governor of Nebraska 1961–1970. Father of Frank B. Morrison, Jr.[362]
    • Frank B. Morrison, Jr., (1937–2006), Justice of the Montana Supreme Court. Son of Frank B. Morrison.
      • John Morrison (1961–), Auditor of Montana, candidate for Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Montana 2006. Son of Frank B. Morrison, Jr..

The Morrisons of Louisiana[edit]

The Morrows[edit]

NOTE: Dwight Morrow's daughter, Anne, was also daughter-in-law of U.S. Representative Charles August Lindbergh.

The Mortons[edit]

NOTE: The Mortons were not related to Vice President Levi P. Morton.

The Mortons of Florida and Virginia[edit]

The Mortons of Indiana[edit]

  • Oliver P. Morton (1823–1877), Circuit Court Judge in Indiana 1852, candidate for Governor of Indiana 1856, Lieutenant Governor of Indiana 1861, Governor of Indiana 1861–1867, U.S. Senator from Indiana 1867–1877. Father of John M. Morton.[370]

NOTE: Oliver P. Morton was also brother-in-law of Dakota Territory Governor John A. Burbank.[372]

The Mortons of New York and Ohio[edit]

  • Daniel O. Morton (1815–1859), Mayor of Toledo, Ohio 1849–1850; U.S. Attorney of Ohio 1853–1857. Brother of Levi P. Morton.[373]
  • Levi P. Morton (1824–1920), U.S. Representative from New York 1879–1881, U.S. Minister to France 1881–1885, Vice President of the United States 1889–1893, Governor of New York 1895–1897. Brother of Daniel O. Morton.[374]

The Mosbachers[edit]

  • Robert Mosbacher (1927–2010), U.S. Secretary of Commerce 1989–1992. Father of Robert Mosbacher, Jr.[375]
    • Robert Mosbacher, Jr. (1951–), candidate for Republican nomination for U.S. Senate from Texas 1984, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1988, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas 1990, candidate for Mayor of Houston, Texas 1997. Son of Robert Mosbacher.[376]

The Moseleys of Virginia and the South[edit]

  • William Moseley,[disambiguation needed] Commissioner of Lower Norfolk Co. (1649–1655), Virginia Colony
    • Arthur Moseley, elected to House of Burgesses, Virginia Colony. Son of William Moseley.
  • Edward Moseley (1682–1749), Surveyor General of North Carolina (1710 -), first colonial Treasurer of North Carolina (1715- ). Speaker of the North Carolina House of Burgesses (the lower house of the legislature) for several terms.
      • William Dunn Moseley (1795–1863), territorial representative for several terms, first Governor of Florida. Descendant of Edward Moseley.

The Moses[edit]

  • Franklin Moses, Sr. (1804–1877), Circuit Court Judge in South Carolina, Chief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court. Father of Franklin Moses, Jr..
    • Franklin Moses, Jr. (1838–1906), Republican National Committeeman, Governor of South Carolina 1872–1874. Son of Franklin Moses, Sr..

The Mousers[edit]

  • Grant E. Mouser (1868–1949), Prosecuting Attorney of Marion County, Ohio 1893–1896; U.S. Representative from Ohio 1905–1909; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1908; Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in Marion County, Ohio 1916–1925. Father of Grant E. Mouser, Jr.[377]

The Mudds[edit]

  • Sydney Emanuel Mudd I (1858–1911), Maryland House Delegate 1879 1881 1895, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1890–1891 1897–1911, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1896. Father of Sydney Emanuel Mudd II.[379]
    • Sydney Emanuel Mudd II (1885–1924), candidate for Maryland House Delegate 1909, candidate for Republican nomination for U.S. Representative from Maryland 1912, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1915–1924. Son of Sydney Emanuel Mudd II.[380]

The Sterlings of Michigan and Nebraska[edit]

The Muhlenbergs[edit]

Main article: Muhlenberg Family

NOTE: Henry Augustus Muhlenberg was also grandson of U.S. Representative Joseph Hiester.[388]

The Mullins[edit]

  • Joseph Mullin (1811–1882), U.S. Representative from New York 1847–1849, Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1857–1881. Father of Joseph Mullin.[389]
    • Joseph Mullin (1848–1897), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1888, New York State Senator 1892–1897. Son of Joseph Mullin.[390]

The Murkowskis[edit]

  • Frank Murkowski (1933–), Alaska Commissioner of Economic Development 1966–1970, candidate for U.S. Representative from Alaska 1970, U.S. Senator from Alaska 1981–2002, Governor of Alaska 2002–2006, candidate for Governor of Alaska 2006. Father of Lisa Murkowski and Eileen Van Wyhe.[391]
    • Lisa Murkowski (1957–), Alaska state representative 1999–2002, U.S. Senator from Alaska, 2002–, candidate for U.S. Senator from Alaska 2010. Daughter of Frank Murkowski. Sister of Eileen Van Wyhe.[392]
    • Eileen Marie (Murkowski) Van Wyhe (1960–), candidate for Alaska State Representative 2000. Daughter of Frank Murkowski. Sister of Lisa Murkowski.

The Murphys[edit]

  • John F. Murphy, candidate for Michigan State Senate 1902, candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1914. Father of William F. Murphy.[393]
    • William F. Murphy (1890–1949), candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1920, Recorder's Court Judge in Michigan 1924–1930, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan 1930–1933; Governor of the Philippine Islands 1933–1935; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1936; Governor of Michigan 1937–1938; Attorney General of the United States 1939–1940; Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1940–1949. Son of John F. Murphy.[394]

The Murrays[edit]

  • William Murray (1803–1875), U.S. Representative from New York 1851–1855. Brother of Ambrose S. Murray.[395]
  • Ambrose S. Murray (1807–1885), Treasurer of Orange County, New York 1851–1854; U.S. Representative from New York 1855–1859; delegate to the Republican National Convention 1856. Brother of William Murray.[396]

The Murrays of Oklahoma[edit]

  • William H. Murray (1869–1956), candidate for Texas State Senate 1890, delegate to the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention 1906, Oklahoma State Representative 1907–1909, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1912, U.S. Representative from Oklahoma 1913–1917, candidate for Democratic nomination for Governor of Oklahoma 1918 1938, Governor of Oklahoma 1931–1935, candidate for Democratic nomination for President of the United States 1932, candidate for U.S. Representative from Oklahoma 1940, candidate for Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate from Oklahoma 1942. Brother of George T. Murray.[397]
  • George T. Murray, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1932. Brother of William H. Murray.[398]
    • Johnston Murray (1902–1974), Governor of Oklahoma 1951–1955, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1952. Son of William H. Murray.[399]

The Murrays of Pennsylvania[edit]

  • John Murray (1768–1843), Pennsylvania State Representative 1807–1810, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1817–1821. Cousin of Thomas Murray, Jr.[400]
  • Thomas Murray, Jr. (1770–1823), Pennsylvania State Representative 1813, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1821–1823. Cousin of John Murray.[401]

The Mutchlers[edit]

  • William Mutchler (1831–1893), Sheriff of Northampton County, Pennsylvania 1854–1860; Prothonotary of Northampton County, Pennsylvania 1861–1867; Chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Committee 1869–1870; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876 1880 1884 1888 1892; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1875–1877 1881–1885 1889–1893. Father of Howard Mutchler.[402]
    • Howard Mutchler (1859–1916), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1893–1895 1901–1903. Son of William Mutchler.[403]

References[edit]

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  78. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  79. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  80. ^ Index to Politicians: Collins-doerrer to Combest. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  81. ^ MARSHALL, Thomas Alexander – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  82. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  83. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  84. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Mccloskey to Mcclung. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  85. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  86. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  87. ^ Index to Politicians: Harvey-edwards to Haskel. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  88. ^ MARSHALL, Humphrey – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  89. ^ Index to Politicians: Marshall. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  90. ^ Index to Politicians: Mayne to Mcallen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  91. ^ MORRIS, Thomas – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  92. ^ Index to Politicians: Jascha to Jeffreys. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  93. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Mccloskey to Mcclung. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  94. ^ Index to Politicians: Taylor, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  95. ^ Index to Politicians: Davie to Davinroy. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  96. ^ Index to Politicians: Randolph. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  97. ^ Index to Politicians: Alsup to Amerson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  98. ^ Index to Politicians: Brockbank to Brockmeyer. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  99. ^ Index to Politicians: Lehmann to Lempesis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  100. ^ Index to Politicians: Birdener to Bishoff. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  101. ^ "Charles Marvin". genealogybuff.com. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  102. ^ "J. Schuyler Marvin: District Attorney". 26thda.org. Retrieved April 16, 2014. 
  103. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Mathewson to Matthew-jenkins. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  104. ^ a b Charles Mathias. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  105. ^ MARTIN, Joshua Lanier – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  106. ^ MARTIN, John Mason – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  107. ^ Index to Politicians: Martin, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  108. ^ Index to Politicians: Martin, E to F. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  109. ^ Index to Politicians: Martin, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  110. ^ Index to Politicians: Owenby to Ozzie. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  111. ^ Index to Politicians: Martin, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  112. ^ Index to Politicians: Barkett to Barlos. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  113. ^ MARTIN, Barclay – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  114. ^ TILLMAN, Lewis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  115. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  116. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  117. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  118. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  119. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  120. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  121. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  122. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  123. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  124. ^ Index to Politicians: Mason. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  125. ^ Index to Politicians: Goodridge to Gordinier. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  126. ^ Index to Politicians: Howard. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  127. ^ Index to Politicians: Barry. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  128. ^ Index to Politicians: Masterson to Matheus. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  129. ^ Index to Politicians: Masterson to Matheus. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  130. ^ Index to Politicians: Masterson to Matheus. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  131. ^ Index to Politicians: Masterson to Matheus. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  132. ^ MATTHEWS, Stanley – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  133. ^ WATTERSON, Henry – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (22 December 1921). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  134. ^ Horace Gray. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  135. ^ WATTERSON, Harvey Magee – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  136. ^ Index to Politicians: Whisenhunt to Whitcraft. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  137. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthews. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  138. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthewson to Maxson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  139. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthewson to Maxson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  140. ^ SLAYDEN, James Luther – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  141. ^ FISHBURNE, John Wood – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  142. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthewson to Maxson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  143. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthewson to Maxson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  144. ^ Index to Politicians: Matthewson to Maxson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  145. ^ Index to Politicians: Maxwell. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  146. ^ Index to Politicians: Maxwell. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  147. ^ Index to Politicians: Robeson to Robins. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  148. ^ Index to Politicians: Mayall to Maynadier. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  149. ^ Index to Politicians: Mayall to Maynadier. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  150. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcbride. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  151. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcbride. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  152. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcbride. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  153. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcbride. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  154. ^ a b Bousquet, Steve. "Bill McBride, Florida gubernatorial candidate defeated by Jeb Bush in 2002, dies at 67". Retrieved 30 July 2013. 
  155. ^ Derby, Kevin (31 January 2014). "David Jolly and Alex Sink Evoke Obama, Scott, Pelosi in Attacks". sunshinestatenews.com. Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  156. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccartin to Mccleery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  157. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccartin to Mccleery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  158. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccartin to Mccleery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  159. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccartin to Mccleery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  160. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccartin to Mccleery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  161. ^ Claire McCaskill. Nndb.com (12 December 2005). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  162. ^ George B. McClellan. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  163. ^ George B. McClellan, Jr. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  164. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  165. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  166. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  167. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  168. ^ Index to Politicians: Adams, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  169. ^ James Van Ness. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  170. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  171. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  172. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcconnico to Mccormally. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  173. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccornack to Mccullis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  174. ^ Index to Politicians: Mccornack to Mccullis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  175. ^ McDOWELL, Joseph – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  176. ^ McDOWELL, Joseph – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  177. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcdowell. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  178. ^ McDUFFIE, George – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  179. ^ Index to Politicians: Hampton. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  180. ^ HAMPTON, Wade – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  181. ^ Index to Politicians: Preston. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  182. ^ Index to Politicians: Preston. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  183. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcduer to Mcfarlan. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  184. ^ Index to Politicians: Mcduer to Mcfarlan. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  185. ^ NEVILLE, William – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  186. ^ McGUIRE, Bird Segle – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  187. ^ McHENRY, John Hardin – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  188. ^ Henry Davis McHENRY —. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  189. ^ K. Gunn McKay. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  190. ^ Monroe G. McKay. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  191. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckay-thompson to Mckechnie. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  192. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckay-thompson to Mckechnie. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  193. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckeegan to Mckenty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  194. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckeegan to Mckenty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  195. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckeegan to Mckenty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  196. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckeegan to Mckenty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  197. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckeegan to Mckenty. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  198. ^ McKENZIE, James Andrew – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (25 June 1904). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  199. ^ MOSS, John McKenzie – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  200. ^ McKIM, Alexander – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  201. ^ Isaac McKIM —. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  202. ^ William McKinley. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  203. ^ Index to Politicians: Fletcher. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  204. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  205. ^ Black Americans in Congress – Cynthia Ann McKinney, Representative from Georgia. Baic.house.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  206. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  207. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  208. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney-foster to Mclaud. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  209. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney-foster to Mclaud. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  210. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney-foster to Mclaud. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  211. ^ McLANE, Louis – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  212. ^ McLANE, Robert Milligan – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  213. ^ Index to Politicians: Mckinney-foster to Mclaud. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  214. ^ Index to Politicians: Walker, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  215. ^ George WALKER —. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  216. ^ Index to Politicians: Cali to Callaghan. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  217. ^ VALLANDIGHAM, Clement Laird – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  218. ^ McMAHON, John A. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov (8 March 1923). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  219. ^ 1931–1955: William H. McNichols. Denvergov.org. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  220. ^ Stephen McNichols. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  221. ^ a b Index to Politicians: Mcphetres to Mcray. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  222. ^ Index to Politicians: Meaghan to Meek. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  223. ^ Index to Politicians: Meaghan to Meek. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  224. ^ MEEK, Carrie P. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  225. ^ MEEK, Kendrick B. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  226. ^ http://thehill.com/spousing-off/leslie-meek-a-spouse-who-stands-on-her-own-two-feet-2007-05-15.html
  227. ^ Thomas Mellon. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  228. ^ Andrew W. Mellon. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  229. ^ Index to Politicians: Bruce. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  230. ^ Index to Politicians: Bruce. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  231. ^ Index to Politicians: Bruce. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  232. ^ GARNETT, Muscoe Russell Hunter – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  233. ^ MERIWETHER, David – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  234. ^ MERIWETHER, James – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  235. ^ Index to Politicians: Merel to Merolla. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  236. ^ MERIWETHER, James A. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  237. ^ Index to Politicians: Pierce. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  238. ^ MERRICK, William Duhurst – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  239. ^ MERRICK, William Matthew – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  240. ^ MERRIMON, Augustus Summerfield – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  241. ^ OVERMAN, Lee Slater – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  242. ^ Index to Politicians: Merritt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  243. ^ Index to Politicians: Merritt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  244. ^ Index to Politicians: Metaker to Meyenborg. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  245. ^ Index to Politicians: Metaker to Meyenborg. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  246. ^ Index to Politicians: Metaker to Meyenborg. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  247. ^ Index to Politicians: Metaker to Meyenborg. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  248. ^ "CURRENT TV / On the Record: Joel Hyatt". The San Francisco Chronicle. 28 August 2010. 
  249. ^ Index to Politicians: Stevenson to Steward. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  250. ^ Index to Politicians: Meyera to Michaux. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  251. ^ Index to Politicians: Meyera to Michaux. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  252. ^ MICA, John L. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  253. ^ Daniel A. Mica. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  254. ^ Index to Politicians: Micheau to Middlesworth. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  255. ^ Index to Politicians: Micheau to Middlesworth. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  256. ^ Index to Politicians: Miles-lagrange to Millentree. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  257. ^ Index to Politicians: Miles-lagrange to Millentree. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  258. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  259. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  260. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  261. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  262. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  263. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  264. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  265. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  266. ^ Zell Miller. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  267. ^ MILLER, Morris Smith – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  268. ^ Index to Politicians: Miller, O to R. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  269. ^ MILLER, Jesse – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  270. ^ MILLER, William Henry – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  271. ^ Index to Politicians: Milliken. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  272. ^ Index to Politicians: Milliken. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  273. ^ Index to Politicians: Milliken. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  274. ^ Index to Politicians: Millsap to Minehart. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  275. ^ Index to Politicians: Millsap to Minehart. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  276. ^ Index to Politicians: Millsap to Minehart. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  277. ^ Index to Politicians: Atkinson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  278. ^ Index to Politicians: Atkinson. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  279. ^ MITCHELL, Alexander – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  280. ^ John Lendrum MITCHELL —. Infoplease.com (29 June 1904). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  281. ^ Resource guide for new residents. Tempe.gov (15 June 2011). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  282. ^ Index to Politicians: Mitchell, O to R. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  283. ^ Index to Politicians: Mitchell, C to D. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  284. ^ Index to Politicians: Mitchell, K to N. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  285. ^ He's now the man with the plan. baltimoresun.com (10 March 2004). Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  286. ^ [3][dead link]
  287. ^ Index to Politicians: Mitchell, U to Z. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  288. ^ William D. Mitchell. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  289. ^ Index to Politicians: Lovejoy to Lowdermilk. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  290. ^ Index to Politicians: Pierce-scott to Piersol. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  291. ^ Index to Politicians: Lovejoy to Lowdermilk. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  292. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  293. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  294. ^ Reference staff (30 July 2010). "Abbot Low Moffat Papers". Biographical Sketch. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives. Retrieved 20 February 2011. 
  295. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  296. ^ Index to Politicians: Bennett, U to Z. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  297. ^ Index to Politicians: Curtis. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  298. ^ Index to Politicians: White, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  299. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  300. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  301. ^ Index to Politicians: Moffat to Momsen. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  302. ^ Index to Politicians: Pattridge to Payn. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  303. ^ MOLLOHAN, Robert Homer – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  304. ^ [4][dead link]
  305. ^ Walter Mondale. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  306. ^ Famous son Ted Mondale officially begins campaign for governor's seat.(NEWS) - Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN) | HighBeam Research
  307. ^ MONEY, Hernando De Soto – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  308. ^ Index to Politicians: Jones, J. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  309. ^ Index to Politicians: Monroe. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  310. ^ Index to Politicians: Monroe. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  311. ^ Index to Politicians: Monroe. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  312. ^ http://www.umw.edu/jamesmonroemuseum/history/site_history/default.php
  313. ^ Index to Politicians: Robinson, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  314. ^ Index to Politicians: Alliston to Alstadt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  315. ^ Index to Politicians: Alliston to Alstadt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  316. ^ Index to Politicians: Alliston to Alstadt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  317. ^ Index to Politicians: Alliston to Alstadt. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  318. ^ Index to Politicians: Montgomery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  319. ^ Index to Politicians: Montgomery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  320. ^ Index to Politicians: Moody. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  321. ^ Index to Politicians: Moody. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  322. ^ MOORE, Arch Alfred, Jr. – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  323. ^ CAPITO, Shelley Moore – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  324. ^ Index to Politicians: Moore, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  325. ^ [5][dead link]
  326. ^ Alfred Moore: Biography from. Answers.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  327. ^ MOORE, Andrew – Biographical Information. Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  328. ^ Index to Politicians: Moore, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  329. ^ Index to Politicians: Spendley to Spragins. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  330. ^ Index to Politicians: Moore, S to T. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  331. ^ Index to Politicians: Moran. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  332. ^ Index to Politicians: Moran. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  333. ^ Index to Politicians: Morgan-smith to Morledge. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  334. ^ Index to Politicians: Morgan-smith to Morledge. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  335. ^ Index to Politicians: Morgan-smith to Morledge. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  336. ^ Index to Politicians: Lehman. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  337. ^ Index to Politicians: Lockyear to Lofvegren. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  338. ^ Index to Politicians: Morehead. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  339. ^ Index to Politicians: Morehead. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  340. ^ Index to Politicians: Morehead. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  341. ^ Index to Politicians: Avery. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  342. ^ Dutch Morial. Nndb.com. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  343. ^ Index to Politicians: Morgan-smith to Morledge. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  344. ^ Index to Politicians: Minor. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
  345. ^ Index to Politicians: Morgan-smith to Morledge. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved on 19 October 2011.
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