List of University of Michigan law and government alumni

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The parent article is at List of University of Michigan alumni
Academic unit key
Symbol Academic unit

ARCH Taubman College
BUS Ross School of Business
COE College of Engineering
DENT School of Dentistry
GFSPP Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
HHRS Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies
LAW Law School
LSA College of LS&A
MED Medical School
SMTD School of Music, Theatre and Dance
PHARM School of Pharmacy
SED School of Education
SNRE School of Natural Resources
SOAD School of Art & Design
SOI School of Information
SON School of Nursing
SOK School of Kinesiology
SOSW School of Social Work
SPH School of Public Health
MDNG Matriculated, did not graduate

This is a partial list of notable alumni in law, government and public policy from the University of Michigan. Please refer also to the below list:

Legislators[edit]

Governors[edit]

  • Víctor Bravo Ahuja (20 February 1918 - 30 August 1990) was a Mexican politician and academician who served as Secretary of Public Education in the administration of Luis Echeverría (1970–76),[1] as Governor of Oaxaca
  • George Ariyoshi (J.D. 1952), third governor of Hawaii (1974–1986)[32]
  • Diego Enrique Arria Salicetti was Governor of the Federal District of Caracas in the mid-1970s.
  • William John Bulow, (LAW: JD 1893) a Senator from South Dakota; member, State senate 1899; mayor of Beresford 1912–1913; county judge of Union County, S.Dak., 1918; Governor of South Dakota 1927–1931; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1930; reelected in 1936 and served from March 4, 1931, to January 3, 1943; chairman, Committee on the Civil Service (Seventy-third through Seventy-seventh Congresses);[33]
  • Wilber Marion Brucker (A.B. 1916) he served as the 32nd Governor of Michigan from 1931 to 1933 and as the United States Secretary of the Army between July 21, 1955 and January 19, 1961.[34]
  • David Francis Cargo (BA 1951, MA 1953; LAW: LLB 1957). Governor of New Mexico, 1967–71. New Mexico State House of Representatives Albuquerque (1963–67).[35]
  • John Cherry (MPA 1984), Lt. Governor of the state of Michigan, and former state senator
  • Fenimore Chatterton governor of Wyoming (1903–1905) Republican[36]
  • Chase Addison Clark governor of Idaho (1941–1943) Democrat[37]
  • William Comstock (A.B. 1899) American politician as the 33rd Governor of the U.S. state of Michigan.[38]
  • Thomas Cuming (A.B. 1845) (December 25, 1827 – March 12, 1858) was an American military officer and politician. He served as the first Secretary of Nebraska Territory and served twice as the territory's Acting Governor, the first time following the death of Francis Burt and the second following the resignation of Mark W. Izard.
  • Cushman Kellogg Davis (AB 1857) – governor of Minnesota (1874–1876); U.S. Senator (1887–1900)[39]
  • Thomas E. Dewey (B.A. 1923) – governor of New York (1943–1954); unsuccessful ran as the Republican nominee for President in 1944 and 1948[40]
  • Frank Emerson (B.S. 1904), governor of Wyoming (1927–1931)[41]
  • Woodbridge Nathan Ferris (MD 1874) – educator and politician; founder and president of the Ferris Industrial School (later Ferris State University); president of the Big Rapids Savings Bank; governor of Michigan (1913–1916); elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1922 and served from March 4, 1923, until his death in 1928.[42]
  • Kamal Ganzouri was appointed as Governor of the New Valley State in 1976 and then became Governor of the Bani Suef State in 1977 but resigned after just six months.
  • Ralph F. Gates (BA 1915; LAW: JD 1917) Governor of Indiana, 1945–49;[43]
  • Fred W. Green (LAW: 1898) was mayor of Ionia, Michigan before he served as the 31st Governor of Michigan from 1927 to 1931.[44]
  • Martha Wright Griffiths, (LAW: JD 1940) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; elected to the Michigan state house of representatives, 1948–1952; elected as a Democrat to the Eighty-fourth and to the nine succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1955 – December 31, 1974); lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1982–1991;[45]
  • Morley Isaac Griswold governor of Nevada (1934–1935) Republican[46]
  • Alex Goresbeck (LAW: LLB 1893), 30th Governor of Michigan[47]
  • Francis Grant "Frank" Higgins was the first native-born person from Montana to become a member of the state's bar and of the state's legislature. He served in the Montana House of Representatives and was elected as the mayor of Missoula, Montana in 1892. He was the fourth Lieutenant Governor of Montana from 1901 to 1905.
  • Lyman Underwood Humphrey governor of Kansas (1889–1893) Republican[48]
  • Arthur Mastick Hyde governor of Missouri (1921–1925) Republican[49]
  • John N. Irwin (December 25, 1844[N 1] – December 22, 1905) was an American businessman, politician and diplomat. Among the positions he held were Mayor of Keokuk, Iowa, Governor of Idaho Territory, Governor of Arizona Territory, and U.S. Minister to Portugal.
  • Patrick Henry Kelley, (LAW: JD 1900) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; member of the State board of education 1901–1905; State superintendent of public instruction 1905–1907; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan 1907–1911; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-third and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1923);[50]
  • Clement Field Kimball (LAW) (August 11, 1868 – September 10, 1928) was Lieutenant Governor of Iowa from 1925 until 1928,
  • Washington Ellsworth Lindsey governor of New Mexico (1917–1919) Republican[51]
  • Elbert L. Lampson (July 30, 1852 – November 18, 1930) Lampson was the 21st Lieutenant Governor of Ohio and former State Senator.
  • Oren Ethelbirt Long, (AB 1916) a Senator from Hawaii; superintendent of public instruction, Territory of Hawaii 1934–1946; secretary of Territory of Hawaii 1946–1951; appointed Governor of Territory of Hawaii 1951–1953; member and vice chairman, Hawaii Statehood Commission 1954–1956; territorial senator, Territory of Hawaii 1956–1959; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate on July 28, 1959; upon the admission of Hawaii as a State into the Union on August 21, 1959, drew the four-year term beginning on that day and ending January 3, 1963;[52]
  • Ernest Whitworth Marland, (LAW: JD 1893) a Congressional Representative from Oklahoma; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third Congress (March 4, 1933 – January 31, 1935); elected Governor of Oklahoma in 1934 for the four-year term commencing January 14, 1935;[53]
  • Joseph R. McLaughlin (June 5, 1851 – July 3, 1932) was an entrepreneur and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan, serving as Lieutenant Governor from 1895 to 1897.
  • George de Rue Meiklejohn, (LAW: JD 1880) a Congressional Representative from Nebraska; member of the State senate 1884–1888 and served as its president 1886–1888; chairman of the Republican State convention of 1887; chairman of the Republican State central committee in 1887 and 1888; Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska 1889–1891; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1897); appointed by President McKinley as Assistant Secretary of War April 14, 1897, and served until March 1901, when he resigned;[54]
  • Julius Sterling Morton (April 22, 1832 – April 27, 1902) was appointed Secretary of Nebraska Territory by President James Buchanan on July 12, 1858, a position he held until 1861. Morton also served as Acting Governor of Nebraska from December 5, 1858, to May 2, 1859.
  • William Francis (Frank) Murphy (April 13, 1890 – July 19, 1949) was a politician, the 35th governor of Michigan and a jurist from Michigan.[55]
  • Carlos Rodado Noriega served as Ambassador of Colombia to Argentina; also served as Ambassador of Colombia to Spain, President of Ecopetrol, Member of the Chamber of Representatives of Colombia, and as the 58th Governor of Atlántico.
  • Culbert Olson (November 7, 1876 – April 13, 1962) was an American lawyer and politician. A Democratic Party member, Olson was involved in Utah and California politics and was elected as the 29th governor of California from 1939 to 1943.
  • Walter Marcus Pierce, (MDNG?) a Congressional Representative from Oregon; attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; engaged in banking and in the power and light business 1898–1907; served in the Oregon senate 1903–1907 and 1917–1921; Governor of Oregon 1923–1927; member of the board of regents of Oregon State College 1905–1927; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1943);[56]
  • Culbert L. Olson, Governor of California (1939–1943)[57]
  • Ridgely Ceylon Powers governor of Mississippi (1871–1874)[58]
  • Donald Stuart Russell governor of South Carolina (1963–1965) Democrat[59]
  • John Franklin Shafroth, governor of Colorado (1909–1913)[60]
  • Kimber Cornellus Sigler, commonly known as Kim Sigler, (May 2, 1894 – November 30, 1953) was an American politician. He served as the 40th Governor of Michigan from 1947 to 1949.[61]
  • Rick Snyder, (LSA, LAW, BUS) 48th and Current Governor of Michigan. Former President, and COO Gateway Computers.[62]
  • Robert Theodore Stafford, (AB: ) a Congressional Representative and a Senator from Vermont; deputy State attorney general 1953–1955; State attorney general 1955–1957; lieutenant Governor 1957–1959; Governor of Vermont 1959–1961; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-seventh Congress in 1960; reelected to the five succeeding Congresses and served from January 3, 1961, until his resignation from the House of Representatives, September 16, 1971, to accept appointment the same day to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Winston L. Prouty; elected by special election January 7, 1972, to complete the unexpired term ending January 3, 1977; reelected in 1976 and again in 1982 for the term ending January 3, 1989;[63]
  • William Story was a United States federal judge and later the seventh Lieutenant Governor of Colorado, serving from 1891 to 1893 under John Long Routt.
  • Charles Spalding Thomas, (LAW: JD 1871) a Senator from Colorado; member of the Democratic National Committee 1884–1896; Governor of Colorado 1899–1901; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1913 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Charles J. Hughes, Jr.; reelected in 1914, and served from January 15, 1913, to March 3, 1921; chairman, Committee on Woman Suffrage (Sixty-third and Sixty-fourth Congresses), Committee on Coast Defenses (Sixty-fifth Congress), Committee on Pacific Railroads (Sixty-sixth Congress);[64]
  • Murray Delos Van Wagoner (COE: BA CE 1921) (March 18, 1898 – June 12, 1986) was an American politician. He served as the 38th Governor of Michigan from 1941 to 1942.[65]
  • G. Mennen "Soapy" Williams (LAW: JD) – Six-term Democratic Governor of Michigan (1948–1960) and later Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice.[66]
  • Edwin B. Winans (LAW) (May 16, 1826 – July 4, 1894) was a U.S. Representative from and the 22nd Governor of the US state of Michigan.
  • Harriett Woods (AB 1949), Missouri's first female lieutenant governor. Woods, a Democrat, became Missouri’s lieutenant governor in 1984 and served one term as the state’s No. 2 executive. Before that, she served eight years in the state Senate, two years on a state transportation commission and eight years on the University City Council. At Michigan, she was the first female editor of the college newspaper.
  • Richard Yates governor of Illinois (1901–1905) Republican[67]

Local government[edit]

Ambassadors[edit]

  • H. Gardner Ackley (MA, PhD) formerly the Henry Carter Adams Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Political Economy. A member of the U-M faculty for 43 years, Ackley was a leader in national economic affairs for several decades, including serving as an adviser to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. An expert on the Italian economy, he also was ambassador to Italy.
  • Paul H. Boeker (MA Economics) – United States Ambassador to Jordan (1984–87); Director, Foreign Service Institute (1980–83); United States Ambassador to Bolivia (1977–80)
  • Anson Burlingame, United States Ambassador to China (1861–70)
  • Lawrence E. Butler(BUS: MBA) US Ambassador to Macedonia, 2002–05;UN Official Principal Deputy High Representative in Bosnia-Herzegovina (2005–present);US Ambassador to Macedonia (2002–05); US National Security Council Staff, Director of European Affairs (1997–99); US Ambassador to Serbia ad interim (1995–96); US State Department Deputy Chief of Mission, Belgrade, Serbia-Montenegro (−1995);US State Department Deputy Chief of Mission, Copenhagen, Denmark (past); US State Department Deputy Chief of Mission, Dublin, Ireland (past)
  • William L. Cargo (B.A. Class of 1933) In 1973, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Nepal.
  • Luis CdeBaca (J.D. 1993) Ambassador-at-Large to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the United States Department of State; was lead trial counsel in the largest slavery prosecution in U.S. history
  • Brutus J. Clay II (COE: 1868)In 1905 he was appointed Minister to Switzerland, serving until 1910.
  • John R. Dawson (B.A. 1973), United States Ambassador to Peru, 2002–03
  • Gerrit J. Diekema (LAW) was appointed United States Minister to the Netherlands by President Herbert Hoover on August 20, 1929, and served until his death in The Hague, Netherlands.
  • Robert F. Ellsworth (J.D. 1949), U.S. Representative from Kansas (1961–1969); United States Permanent Representative to NATO (1969–1971)
  • Brian James Proetel Fall was educated at St Paul's School, London, Magdalen College, Oxford, and the University of Michigan Law School. Britain's Ambassador to Russia 1992–95.
  • Homer S. Ferguson (B.A. 1913), judge of the United States Court of Military Appeals (1956–1971); Ambassador to the Philippines (1955–1956); judge of the United States Court of Military Appeals at Washington, D.C., 1956–1971; U.S. Senator from Michigan (1943–1955); circuit judge of the circuit court for Wayne County, Michigan (1929–1942)
  • James Goodby or James Eugene Goodby (MDNG: 1951–1952), United States Ambassador to Finland (1980–1981)
  • David Hermelin, (BUS: BBA 1958) – Entrepreneur, philanthropist and former United States Ambassador to Norway. Ross School benefactor.
  • Aubrey Hooks (MA 1984) US Ambassador to Côte d'Ivoire
  • John Nichol Irwin (December 25, 1844[N 1] – December 22, 1905) was an American businessman, politician and diplomat. Among the positions he held were Mayor of Keokuk, Iowa, Governor of Idaho Territory, Governor of Arizona Territory, and U.S. Minister to Portugal.
  • Susan S. Jacobs A former U.S. Ambassador to Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu,
  • Richard Kauzlarich (MA) served as United States Ambassador to Azerbaijan in 1994-1997 and to Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1997-1999.
  • Leo J. Keena appointed by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and served as the United States Ambassador to Honduras from February 1935 to May 1937 and as United States Ambassador to South Africa from July 1937 to August 1942
  • Philip Lader (LSA: MA) – United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom 1997–2001
  • Melvyn Levitsky, (BA) a retired Career Minister in the U.S. Foreign Service, teaches international relations at the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and is Senior Fellow of the School’s International Policy Center. During his 35-year career as a U.S. diplomat, Ambassador Levitsky was Ambassador to Brazil from 1994–98 and before that held such senior positions as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters, Executive Secretary of the State Department, Ambassador to Bulgaria, Deputy Director of the Voice of America, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights.
  • María Dora Victoriana Mejía Marulanda (B.A. M.A.) (born 23 April 1943) is the current Ambassador of Colombia to Sweden.
  • Fenton R. McCreery, Ambassador to Honduras
  • Douglas L. McElhaney (BA International Affairs) United States Ambassador to Bosnia-Herzegovina from 2004 – present. Entered the Foreign Service in 1975.
  • Joseph R. McLaughlin was an entrepreneur and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan, serving as Lieutenant Governor from 1895 to 1897.
  • William Bryant Milam (MA 1970) US Ambassador to Pakistan, 1998–2001
  • Thomas J. Miller (PhD 1975) U.S. ambassador to Greece. He was also U.S. ambassador to Bosnia-Herzegovina.
  • José Teodoro Moscoso Mora (B.A. 1932) In May 1961, United States President John F. Kennedy named Moscoso ambassador to Venezuela
  • Robert G. Neumann also known as Robert Gerhard Neumann. (Ph.D 1946). Formerly United States Ambassador to Afghanistan 1969–73. Administrator: Director, Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, Georgetown University (1976–81).US Ambassador to Saudi Arabia (Jun-1981 to Jul-1981), United States Ambassador to Morocco (1973–76).
  • David George Newton (MA 1970) US Ambassador to Iraq, 1984–88
  • Elliot Northcott, Ambassador to Colombia and Venezuela
  • Thomas J.O'Brien (LAW), was, variously, ambassador to Denmark, Japan and Italy
  • Susan D. Page (A.B.), nominated, in 2011 by President Obama, to the post of U.S. Ambassador to South Sudan.
  • Thomas W. Palmer was appointed United States Minister to Spain on March 12, 1889 by U.S. President Benjamin Harrison and served from June 17, 1889 to April 19, 1890.
  • Mark A. Pekala, (A.B. 1981) confirmed as U.S. ambassador to Latvia in 2012. Earned a Master’s in International Affairs at the Columbia University School of International Affairs in 1983, and an M.Phil. in Political Science at Columbia University in 1988.
  • Peter A. Prahar, (B.A.) A former Air Force translator, Mr. Prahar, is the latest ambassador to the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), a country of tiny, scattered islands in the Western Pacific. In 1983, the US and FSM governments entered into a status of Free Association, which provides Micronesia with significant financial assistance in exchange for U.S. defense rights in the region. The FSM islands were part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, established after World War II by the United Nations but administered by the United States beginning in 1947. The FSM consists of four states: Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei, and Kosrae.
  • William E. Quinby was an American newspaper publisher and diplomat who served as United States Ambassador to the Netherlands.
  • Clark T. Randt, Jr. (LAW: JD 1975) US Ambassador to China, 2001–2009
  • Margaret Scobey (Ph.D ) US Ambassador to Syria; as of 2008, US Ambassador to Egypt
  • Marshall D. Shulman, (A.B. 1937) the principal architect of Columbia University’s Russian studies program. Dr. Shulman was the longest serving director of the Russian Institute at Columbia, which became the W. Averell Harriman Institute for Advanced Study of the Soviet Union in 1982, after Dr. Shulman persuaded Mr. Harriman and his wife, Pamela, to endow the institute with $11.5 million. He also held the rank of ambassador as the principal adviser on Soviet matters to Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance in the Carter administration and was a speechwriter for Secretary of State Dean G. Acheson in the Truman administration. His best known book, "Stalin’s Foreign Policy Reappraised" (1963), was a staple in Soviet studies for many years, and his 1966 book of lectures, Beyond the Cold War, foreshadowed the détente between the Soviet Union and the United States that occurred during the Nixon administration.
  • William Graves Sharp, (LAW: JD 1881) a Congressional Representative from Ohio; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-first, Sixty-second, and Sixty-third Congresses and served from March 4, 1909, to July 23, 1914, when he resigned to become Ambassador to France, in which capacity he served until April 14, 1919;
  • William Story (4 April 1843 – 20 June 1921) was a United States federal judge and later the seventh Lieutenant Governor of Colorado, serving from 1891 to 1893 under John Long Routt.
  • Louis B. Susman, former Vice Chairman Citigroup Capital Markets, nominated Ambassador to Great Britain in 2009
  • Edwin Uhl, Acting US Secretary of State and Ambassador to Germany during the Cleveland Administration.
  • Jack Hood Vaughn (BA, MA) was the second Director of the United States Peace Corps succeeding Sargent Shriver. He later served as Ambassador to both Colombia and Panama.
  • Gary Waissi (COE: Ph.D.), dean of ASU's School of Global Management and Leadership at the West campus, has earned recognition as Knight, First Class, of the Order of the Lion of Finland in 2006. The recognition was awarded by the President of the Republic of Finland, Tarja Halonen, and is based on civilian accomplishments while Waissi served as Honorary Consul of Finland in Michigan from 1998 to 2006.
  • Howard Kent Walker (born December 3, 1935) is a US diplomat, Foreign Service officer, former United States Ambassador to Togo, Madagascar, and Comoros.
  • Charles B. Warren (B.A. 1891) Warren served as U.S. Ambassador to Japan between 1921-1922. Warren became U.S. Ambassador to Mexico in 1924.
  • Ronald N. Weiser (BUS: BBA 1966) – Former US Ambassador to Slovak Republic. Founder of McKinley Associates.
  • G. Mennen Williams (J.D.), (February 23, 1911 – February 2, 1988), was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. An heir to a personal grooming products fortune, he was known as "Soapy," and wore a trademark green bow tie with white polka dots. Ambassador to the Philippines.

Federal Reserve/FDIC/OCC/Treasury[edit]

Judiciary[edit]

  • Jackson Leroy Adair, (LAW: JD 1911) a Congressional Representative from Illinois; member of the State senate 1928–1932; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third and Seventy-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1937); appointed United States district judge for the southern district of Illinois in 1937 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and served until his death in Quincy, Ill., January 19, 1956;
  • Charles H. Aldrich (A.B. 1875) was a Solicitor General of the United States.
  • Prudence Carter Beatty, US Bankruptcy Judge for the Southern District of New York Prudence Carter Beatty
  • George G. Bingham (LLB 1880), judge in Oregon, dean of Willamette University College of Law.[69]
  • Brian Blanchard (BA 1980), Judge of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.
  • William L. Carpenter, (LAW:1877?), elected Third Judicial Circuit of Michigan in 1894 and member of the Michigan Supreme Court from 1902 until 1904.
  • Jackson Burton Chase, (LAW: LLB 1913) a Congressional Representative from Nebraska; assistant attorney general of Nebraska in 1921 and 1922; member of the State house of representatives in 1933 and 1934; served as a major, Judge Advocate General’s Department, 1942–1945; chairman of Nebraska Liquor Control Commission in 1945 and 1946; judge of the fourth judicial district court of Nebraska, 1946–1954; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-fourth Congress (January 3, 1955 – January 3, 1957); again elected judge of the fourth judicial district court of Nebraska 1956–1960;
  • John Logan Chipman (1843–1845) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; attorney of the police board of Detroit 1867–1879; elected judge of the superior court of Detroit May 1, 1879; reelected in 1885 and served until 1887, when he resigned, having been elected to Congress; elected as a Democrat to the Fiftieth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1887, until his death in Detroit, Mich., on August 17, 1893; interment in Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  • George Pierre Codd, (AB 1891) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; mayor of Detroit in 1905 and 1906; circuit judge of Wayne County 1911–1921; regent of the University of Michigan in 1910 and 1911; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-seventh Congress (March 4, 1921 – March 3, 1923); again elected circuit judge of Wayne County in 1924 and served until his death in Detroit, Mich., on February 16, 1927.
  • Avern Cohn (LAW: JD 1949) – Appointed a district judge for the United States District Court, Eastern District of Michigan, by President Jimmy Carter in 1979.
  • Louis Convers Cramton, (LAW: JD 1899) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; law clerk of the State senate three terms; deputy commissioner of railroads of Michigan in 1907; secretary of the Michigan Railroad Commission from September 1907 to January 1, 1909; member of the State house of representatives in 1909 and 1910; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-third and to the eight succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1931); circuit judge of the fortieth judicial circuit from November 21, 1934, to December 31, 1941;
  • Irene Cortes, (LL.M, S.J.D.) an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines from 1987–1990 and the first female dean of the University of the Philippines College of Law;
  • Shepard J. Crumpacker, Jr., (LAW: JD 1941) a Congressional Representative from Indiana; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-second, Eighty-third, and Eighty-fourth Congresses (January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1957); appointed judge of the St. Joseph Superior Court and served from 1977–1985;
  • Marc Dann (B.A. 1984) 47th attorney general of Ohio
  • Harry Micajah Daugherty (LAW: LL.B) was an American politician. A key Ohio Republican political insider, Daugherty is best remembered for his service as Attorney General of the United States under Presidents Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge.
  • Cristobal C. Duenas (LAW: JD 1952), appointed judge of the U.S. District Court of Guam. Duenas was judge of the Island Court of Guam, and was previously director of the Department of Land Management.
  • Robert Emory Evans, (LAW: JD 1886) a Congressional Representative from Nebraska; prosecuting attorney of Dakota County in 1895; resigned to become judge of the eighth judicial district, in which capacity he served from 1895 to 1899; president of the Nebraska State Bar Association in 1919; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-sixth and Sixty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1919 – March 3, 1923); elected judge of the supreme court from the third district of Nebraska in 1924;
  • Homer Samuel Ferguson, (AB 1913) a Senator from Michigan; circuit judge of the circuit court for Wayne County, Mich., 1929–1942; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1942; reelected in 1948 and served from January 3, 1943, to January 3, 1955; Ambassador to the Philippines 1955–1956; judge of the United States Court of Military Appeals at Washington, D.C., 1956–1971.
  • George Ford, (LAW: JD 1869) a Congressional Representative from Indiana; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-ninth Congress (March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1887); elected judge of the superior court of St. Joseph County in 1914;
  • Ralph McKenzie Freeman (LAW: LL.B. 1926) was a Judge in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Judge Freeman was nominated by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower on May 10, 1954, to a newly created seat and was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 8, 1954. He received his commission on June 10, 1954. Freeman served as chief judge from 1967 to 1972 and assumed senior status on July 1, 1973.
  • Ronald Murray Gould (LAW: 1973) is a federal appeals judge who has served on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals since 1999. Gould was nominated by President Bill Clinton. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on November 17 and received his commission on November 22.
  • Byron Berry Harlan, (LAW: JD 1909; LS&A: 1911a Congressional Representative from Ohio; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-second and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1931 – January 3, 1939); chairman, Committee on Revision of the Laws (Seventy-second and Seventy-third Congresses); appointed judge of the Tax Court of the United States in 1946 to his death in Williamsport, Pa., November 11, 1949;
  • James Harvey, (LAW: LLB 1948) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-seventh and to the six succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1961 – January 31, 1974); appointed by President Richard Nixon as a United States District Court judge for the Eastern District, Michigan, 1974–1984; United States Senior District judge, 1984–2002;
  • Guy Tresillian Helvering, (LAW: JD 1906) a Congressional Representative from Kansas; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-third, Sixty-fourth, and Sixty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1919); Democratic State chairman 1930–1934; mayor of Salina, Kans., from February 15, 1926, until his resignation on December 8, 1930; State highway director in 1931 and 1932; appointed Commissioner of Internal Revenue by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933 and served until his appointment as a Federal district judge for Kansas in 1943, in which capacity he was serving at the time of his death in Washington, D.C., on July 4, 1946.
  • Douglas Woodruff Hillman (LAW: JD 1948), practiced law in Grand Rapids for 30 years before President Carter appointed him to the federal court in 1979. He retired from the bench in 2002.
  • Jay Abel Hubbell, (AB 1853) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; prosecuting attorney of Houghton County 1861–1867; elected as a Republican to the Forty-third and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1883); chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Forty-seventh Congress); member of the State senate 1885–1887; served as circuit judge of the twelfth judicial circuit from January 1, 1894, to December 31, 1899, when he resigned;
  • William Leonard Hungate, (MDNG) a Congressional Representative from Missouri; born in Benton, Franklin County, Ill., December 14, 1922; special assistant attorney general, 1958–1964; elected simultaneously as a Democrat to the Eighty-eighth and to the Eighty-ninth Congress by special election, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of United States Representative Clarence Cannon, and reelected to the five succeeding Congresses (November 3, 1964 – January 3, 1977); professor, University of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo., 1977–1979; justice, United States district judge for the eastern district of Missouri, 1979–1992; president, American Bar Association’s National Conference of Federal Trial Judges, 1985–1986;
  • Edwin William Keightley, (LAW: JD 1865) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; appointed and subsequently elected judge of the fifteenth judicial circuit of Michigan in 1876 and served until 1877, having been elected to Congress; elected as a Republican to the Forty-fifth Congress (March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1879); appointed by President Hayes Third Auditor of the United States Treasury Department and served from April 30, 1879, to April 30, 1885, when he resigned;
  • Mary Beth Kelly (B.A.) is a justice on the Michigan Supreme Court, elected in November 2010.
  • Moses Pierce Kinkaid, (LAW: JD 1876) a Congressional Representative from Nebraska; member of the State senate in 1883; district judge 1887–1900; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-eighth and to the nine succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1903, until his death in Washington, D.C., July 6, 1922; chairman, Committee on Irrigation of Arid Lands (Sixty-sixth and Sixty-seventh Congresses);
  • William Lewis, (MDNG) a Congressional Representative from Kentucky; studied law at the University of Kentucky at Lexington and at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; member of State house of representatives in 1900 and 1901; Commonwealth attorney 1904–1909; circuit judge of the twenty-seventh judicial district of Kentucky 1909–1922 and 1928–1934; elected as a Republican to the Eightieth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John Marshall Robsion and served from April 24, 1948, to January 3, 1949;
  • George A. Malcolm, (LAW: JD 1906) an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines from 1917–1936 and founder of the University of the Philippines College of Law;
  • David Mills, (LAW: LLB 1867), was a Canadian Supreme Court judge. He served as Minister of the Interior in the Cabinet of Alexander Mackenzie from 1876 to 1878. Sir Wilfrid Laurier appointed Mills to the Canadian Senate after he lost his Commons seat in 1896, and appointed him to Cabinet as Minister of Justice and Leader of the Government in the Canadian Senate. He resigned from the Senate and Cabinet in 1902. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada on February 8, 1902, and served on the Court for one year until his death in 1903. He published The Present and Future Political Aspects of Canada in 1860 and The Blunders of the Dominion Government in connection with the North-West Territory in 1871.
  • US Attorney General & US Supreme Court Justice Frank Murphy (LL.B. 1914)
  • Gordon Myse, (LAW: LLB 1960), Judge of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.
  • James Carson Needham, (LAW: JD 1889) a Congressional Representative from California; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-sixth and to the six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1913); appointed judge of the superior court of California January 1, 1919; elected to the same office in 1920 to fill an unexpired term; reelected in 1922 and again in 1926, and served until January 1, 1935;
  • Darleen Ortega, (LAW: JD 1989) judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals.
  • Samuel Ritter Peters, (LAW: JD 1867) a Congressional Representative from Kansas; mayor of Memphis in 1873; elected a member of the State senate in 1874 and served until his resignation in March 1875; appointed and subsequently elected judge of the ninth judicial district and served from 1875 until 1883, when he resigned; elected as a Republican to the Forty-eighth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1891); postmaster of Newton 1898–1910; editor of the Newton Daily Kansas-Republican in 1899;
  • Rosemary S. Pooler (LAW: JD) (born 1938), is a U.S. federal judge. In 1990, she was appointed as a Justice for the Fifth Judicial District Supreme Court. Four years later, she was appointed to the federal bench by President Bill Clinton, serving from 1994 to 1998, as federal district judge in the Northern District of New York. She received her current appointment as a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998.
  • Joseph Very Quarles, (AB 1966; LAW: JD 1867) a Senator from Wisconsin; mayor of Kenosha 1876; member, State assembly 1879; member, State senate 1880–1882; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1899, to March 3, 1905; chairman, Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard (Fifty-sixth Congress), Committee on the Census (Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses); appointed United States district judge for the eastern district of Wisconsin by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1905, and served until his death in Milwaukee, Wis., October 7, 1911;
  • Ozora P. Stearns, (AB 1858, LAW: JD 1860) a Senator from Minnesota; mayor of Rochester 1866–1868; served in the Union Army during the Civil War as a lieutenant, and then colonel; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate on January 18, 1871, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Daniel S. Norton and served from January 23 to March 3, 1871; judge of the eleventh judicial district of Minnesota 1874–1895; regent of the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis 1890–1895;
  • Justice George Sutherland, United States Supreme Court
  • Clifford Taylor (BA 1964) the Chief Justice of Michigan's Supreme Court. Taylor was appointed to the Court in 1997 by Republican Gov. John Engler and was re-elected in 2000 to serve an eight-year term. In 2004, he was first chosen by the justices to serve as Chief Justice. In 1992, Gov. Engler appointed him to the Michigan Court of Appeals where he served until his appointment to the Michigan Supreme Court. Taylor was also the co-author of West Publishing's Michigan Practice Guide on Torts.
  • Larry D. Tompson (LAW: 1974), Deputy United States Attorney General.
  • Martha Lee Walters (BA 1972), Justice, Oregon Supreme Court
  • Carl May Weideman, (MDNG) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; attended the public schools and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor from 1914 until the outbreak of the First World War; delegate to the Democratic State conventions 1932–1944 and to the Democratic National Convention in 1940; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third Congress (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935); circuit judge for the third judicial circuit of the State of Michigan May 1, 1950 – September 15, 1968;

Justices: state of Michigan Supreme Court[edit]

Michigan law has placed 33 of its graduates on the state's supreme court.[70]

  • Adams, Clark Jayno (MLaw: 1927; On Court: 1952–1953 )
  • Adams, Paul Lincoln (MLaw: 1936; On Court: 1962-1962 and 1964–1972 )
  • Butzel, Henry M. (MLaw: 1892; On Court: 1929–1935 )
  • Boyles, Emerson R. (MLaw: 1903; On Court: 1940–1956 )
  • Carpenter, William Leland (MLaw: 1878; On Court: 1902–1904 )
  • Carr, Leland Walker (MLaw: 1906; On Court: 1941–1963 )
  • Dethmers, John R. (MLaw: 1927; On Court: 1946–1970 ), served as Chief Justice
  • Fead, Louis Henry (MLaw: 1900; On Court: 1928–1937 ), served as Chief Justice
  • Fitzgerald, John Warner (MLaw: 1954; On Court: 1974–1982 ), served as Chief Justice
  • Griffin, Robert Paul (MLaw: 1950; On Court: 1987–1994 )
  • Hooker, Frank Arthur (MLaw: 1865; On Court: 1893–1907 )
  • Kuhn, Franz Christian (MLaw: 1894; On Court: 1912–1919 )
  • Levin, Charles Leonard (MLaw: 1947; On Court: 1973–1996 )
  • Lindemer, Lawrence B. (MLaw: 1948; On Court: 1975–1976 )
  • Marston, Isaac (MLaw: 1861; On Court: 1875–1883 )
  • McGrath, John Wesley (MLaw: 1868; On Court: 1891–1895 )
  • McAlvay, Aaron Vance (MLaw: 1869; On Court: 1905–1915 )
  • McDonald, John Samuel (MLaw: 1891; On Court: 1922–1933 )
  • McAllister, Thomas F. (MLaw: 1921; On Court: 1938–1941 )
  • Moody, Blair (MLaw: 1952; On Court: 1977–1982 )
  • Joseph B. Moore, studied for 1 year at Michigan Law (On Court: 1896–1926) Served as Chief Justice over several periods.
  • North, Walter Harper (MLaw: 1899; On Court: 1927–1952 )
  • Ostrander, Russell Cowles (MLaw: 1876; On Court: 1905–1919 )
  • Potter, William W. (MLaw: 1895; On Court: 1928–1940 ), served as Chief Justice
  • Snow, Ernest Albert (MLaw: 1896; On Court: 1926–1927 )
  • Starr, Raymond Wesley (MLaw: 1910; On Court: 1941–1946 )
  • Sharpe, Edward MacGlen (MLaw: 1914; On Court: 1934–1957 )
  • Smith, Talbot (MLaw: 1934; On Court: 1955–1961 )
  • Souris, Theodore (MLaw: 1949; On Court: 1960–1968 )
  • David Viviano, (MLaw: 1996; On Court: 2013– )
  • Voelker, John D. (MLaw: 1928; On Court: 1957–1959)
  • Weadock, Thomas Addis Emmett (MLaw: 1873; On Court: 1933-1933 )
  • Williams, G. Mennen (MLaw: 1936; On Court: 1971–1986 ), served as Chief Justice

Justices From other States/Michigan-Schools

  • Clifford Taylor (B.A.) was Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court from 2005 through 2009.
  • Charles Blakey Blackmar (April 22, 1922 – January 20, 2007) was a judge of the Supreme Court of Missouri from 1982 to 1992, and chief justice of the court from 1989 to 1991.

Attorneys General[edit]

  • Paul L. Adams (1908–1990) was a member of the Michigan Supreme Court in 1962 and also from 1964-1972. He was mayor of Sault Ste. Marie from 1938 to 1942. Became the Attorney General of Michigan in 1957. In 1962 he left that position when Governor John Swainson appointed him a member of the Michigan Supreme Court.
  • Eugene F. Black (1903–1990 In 1945, Black was elected Michigan Attorney General as a Republican,
  • Charles A. Blair (1854–1912) was a member of the Michigan Supreme Court from 1905 until 1912. Blair held several public offices including serving as prosecuting attorney for Jackson County. In 1902 he was elected Attorney General of Michigan.
  • Clarence Addison Brimmer, Jr. He was the state attorney general of Wyoming from 1971 to 1974.
  • Wilber Marion Brucker served as assistant attorney general of Michigan, 1927–1928, and as Michigan Attorney General, 1928–1930.
  • Warren Booth Burrows He was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from 1925 to 1927 and the Connecticut Senate from 1927 to 1928. He was the state attorney general of Connecticut from 1931 to 1935.
  • Charles Burson served almost a decade as Tennessee Attorney General. In 1999 Charles Burson became Gore's Chief of Staff, replacing Ron Klain who resigned in August of that year.
  • Pamela Carter was the first black woman to serve as a state's attorney general.
  • Mike Cox (born 1961) was Michigan's 52nd Attorney General
  • Marc Dann is a former American politician of the Democratic Party,[1] who served as the Attorney General of Ohio from 2007 until his resignation on May 14, 2008.
  • Harry M. Daugherty (LAW) Daugherty is best remembered for his service as Attorney General of the United States under Presidents Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge.
  • Ulysses G. Denman (November 26, 1866 – October 30, 1962) was a Republican politician from the state of Ohio. He was Ohio Attorney General from 1908-1911 .
  • John R. Dethmers Dethmers served as Chairman of the Michigan Republican Party from 1942–1945 and was a delegate to the 1944 Republican National Convention. He served as Michigan Attorney General from 1945-1946.
  • Horace Weldon Gilmore He was a member of the Michigan Board of Tax Appeals in 1954, and a deputy state attorney general of Michigan from 1954 to 1956. He was a judge on the 3rd Judicial Circuit, Detroit, Michigan from 1956 to 1980.
  • Alexander J. Groesbeck was an American politician who served as Attorney General and the 30th Governor of the State of Michigan
  • Shiro Kashiwa (October 24, 1912 – March 13, 1998) was the first Attorney General of Hawaii to be appointed after it became a state in 1959.
  • Franz C. Kuhn He was a probate judge and became the Michigan Attorney General in 1910.
  • George A. Malcolm Following his graduation, Malcolm proceeded to the Philippines, which was then a colony of the United States. As of 1911, he was acting attorney-general for the Philippines.
  • Dwight May In 1868, he was elected to the office of Michigan Attorney General and served from 1869-1873 under Governor Henry P. Baldwin.
  • Frank Millard In 1950, Millard was elected as Michigan Attorney General. He served in that position from January 1951 through December 1954.
  • William J. Morgan (December 13, 1883 - day of death unknown)served as Wisconsin Attorney General 1912-1923 as a Republican.
  • Frank Murphy United States Attorney General (1939–40)
  • William W. Potter He served as Michigan Attorney General from 1927 to 1928
  • Charles Byron Renfrew On November 29, 1971, Renfrew was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California vacated by Gerald S. Levin. Renfrew was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 2, 1971, and received his commission on December 9, 1971. Renfrew served in that capacity until February 27, 1980, when he resigned to become United States Deputy Attorney General, serving in that post until 1981.
  • John W. Reynolds, Sr. (October 1, 1876 – February 4, 1958) was Attorney General of Wisconsin from 1927 to 1933.[1] He was elected as a Republican.
  • Stephen John Roth He was an Attorney general of Michigan from 1949 to 1950.
  • Kenneth Salazar Prior to his election to the U.S. Senate, he served as Attorney General of Colorado from 1999 to 2005.
  • Raymond Wesley Starr was Attorney General of Michigan from 1937 to 1938,
  • John M. Sheets was a Republican politician from the U. S. State of Ohio. He was Ohio Attorney General from 1900-1904.
  • Winfield Smith was Attorney General of Wisconsin from 1862 to 1866. He was a Republican.
  • Robert Stafford entered Vermont statewide politics, serving as deputy attorney general for the state from 1953 to 1955, and attorney general from 1955 to 1957.
  • James M. Swift was a lawyer, District Attorney of Massachusetts Southern District and Attorney General of Massachusetts.
  • Cyrus Nils Tavares Tavares was the deputy attorney general of Hawaii, 1927–1934 before returning to private practice in Honolulu, Hawaii, 1934-1941. During World War II, he was the special deputy attorney general of Hawaii for war matters, 1941–1942, the assistant attorney general of Hawaii, 1942–1943, and the Attorney General of Hawaii, 1944–1947.
  • Larry Thompson is an American lawyer, most notable for his service as deputy Attorney General of the United States under United States President George W. Bush until August 2003.
  • Paul W. Voorhies (December 17, 1875 -- January 8, 1952) was a Michigan lawyer who served as Wayne County Prosecutor and Michigan Attorney General.
  • Robert Wefald Wefald served as the 26th North Dakota Attorney General from 1981 through 1984.

Presidents and Prime Ministers[edit]

Military[edit]

Foreign officials[edit]

Secretaries of the Cabinet[edit]

  • Clinton Presba Anderson, (1915–1916) a Congressional Representative and a Senator from New Mexico;
  • Edgardo Angara (LAW: LLM 1964) Secretary of Agriculture (emeritus) of the Philippines and former Executive Secretary.
  • Chulanope Snidvongs na Ayuthaya (COE: MSE) Privy Councillor to the King of Thailand.
  • Rand Beers, (MA 1970). Had a public service career spanning 25 years. Was assigned to take over the terrorism and narcotics desk at the National Security Council following Oliver North. In October 1998, was appointed by President Bill Clinton to the position of Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotic and Law Enforcement Affairs. Was assigned to counter terrorism in the George W. Bush White House. Joined the John Kerry campaign as a foreign policy advisor.
  • Bill Brehm, (A.B. M.A.), served as assistant secretary of the army under Presidents Johnson and Nixon and as assistant secretary of defense under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Chairman (emeritus) of SRA International.
  • Douglas A. Brook, (B.A., M.A.), nominated, in 2007, to be Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Dr. Brook currently serves as Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Center for Defense Management Reform in the School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. Prior to this, he served as Dean of the School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. Earlier in his career, he served as Acting Director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management).
  • Wilber Marion Brucker (A.B. 1916) Secretary of the Army
  • Roy D. Chapin, Sr. (MDNG)US Secretary of Commerce, 1932–33;Hudson Motors President & CEO (1934–36); US Secretary of Commerce (1932–33); Hudson Motors President & CEO (1909–23);Hudson Motors Co-Founder (1906–09); Member of the Board of Hudson Motors (as Chairman 1923–36)
  • Santiago Creel Miranda(born on December 11, 1954 in Mexico City) is a Mexican senator representing the right-of-center National Action Party who served as Secretary of the Interior in the cabinet of President Vicente Fox.
  • Terry Davis (BUS: MBA 1962) – Member of Britain's Parliament for 28 years, now Secretary General of the Council of Europe and human rights activist.
  • William Rufus Day, United States Secretary of State during the Mckinley administration, he later negotiated the Peace Treaty ending the Spanish–American War and was later appointed as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court by President Theodore Roosevelt.
  • Edwin C. Denby, (LAW: JD 1896) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; went to China in 1885 with his father, who was United States Minister; employed in the Chinese imperial maritime customs service 1887–1894; member of the State house of representatives in 1903; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses (March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911); president of the Detroit Charter Commission in 1913 and 1914; president of the Detroit Board of Commerce in 1916 and 1917; appointed United States Secretary of the Navy by President Harding and served from March 4, 1921, until March 10, 1924.
  • Robert F. Ellsworth (LAW: JD 1949) a Congressional Representative from Kansas; assistant to vice chairman, Federal Maritime Board in 1953 and 1954; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-seventh and to the two succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1967); National Political Director of the Presidential Campaign in 1968; special assistant to President Nixon, 1969; Permanent Representative on the Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, with rank of Ambassador, 1969–1971; general partner in Lazard Freres and Co. of New York City; Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs), 1974–1975; nominated by President Ford to be Deputy Secretary of Defense and served in that capacity from December 1975 until January 1977; vice chairman of the council, 1977–1990, chairman, 1990–1996, vice president, 1996 to present, International Institute for Strategic Studies, London, England; appointed to the U.S.-China Economic Security Review Commission, 2003 to present;
  • Howard Flight, (BUS: MBA) and British MP. Holds 11 directorships. In September 2001, he was appointed Shadow Paymaster General and in July 2002 was promoted to Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury.
  • Dan Glickman, (BA History 1966), a Congressional Representative from Kansas; United States Securities and Exchange Commission, 1969–1970; elected as a Democrat to the Ninety-fifth and to the eight succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1995); one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1986 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against Harry E. Claiborne, judge of the United States District Court for Nevada; chair, Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (One Hundred Third Congress); Congressman Glickman specialized primarily in agricultural matters, although he also chaired the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Among other things, he launched an inquiry into the Aldrich Ames spy case. Was chosen by President Clinton to serve as United States Secretary of Agriculture. In July 2004 Glickman was named Jack Valenti's successor as the president and CEO of the MPAA.
  • James William Good, (LAW: JD 1893) a Congressional Representative from Iowa; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-first and to the six succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1909, until his resignation on June 15, 1921; chairman, Committee on Appropriations (Sixty-sixth and Sixty-seventh Congresses); appointed Secretary of War in the Cabinet of President Hoover and served from March 5, 1929, until his death in Washington, D.C., November 18, 1929;
  • James F. Goodrich (B.S. 1937) (born January 24, 1913) was the United States Under Secretary of the Navy from 1981 to 1987.
  • John L. Henshaw, (SPH: M.P.H. 1974). Serves as assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health, heading up the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
  • George M. Humphrey, United States Secretary of the Treasury during the Eisenhower Administration.
  • Arthur M. Hyde (BA 1899) Governor of Missouri, 1921–25; US Secretary of Agriculture (1929–33)
  • Robert P. Lamont(BSCE 1891) US Commerce Secretary, 1929–32;
  • Estefania Aldaba-Lim ( Ph.D 1942). the first female Filipino Cabinet secretary serving as social services and development secretary from 1971 to 1977. She was also the first Filipino clinical psychologist. She played prominent roles as the former assistant secretary general of the United Nations Children's Fund's International Year of the Child. Was President of the Girl Scouts of the Philippines. She also founded the Museo Pambata in Manila. In 1948 she set up the Institute of Human Relations at Philippine Women's University. Ms. Aldab-Lim became was the first woman to become special ambassador to the United Nations, with the rank of assistant secretary general during the International Year of the Child in 1979. She received the UN Peace Medal Award from then Secretary General Kurt Waldheim.
  • George de Rue Meiklejohn, (LAW: JD 1880) a Congressional Representative from Nebraska; member of the State senate 1884–1888 and served as its president 1886–1888; chairman of the Republican State convention of 1887; chairman of the Republican State central committee in 1887 and 1888; Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska 1889–1891; elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1897); appointed by President McKinley as Assistant Secretary of War April 14, 1897, and served until March 1901, when he resigned;
  • Julius Sterling Morton, (A.B. 1854), United States Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland and founder of the National Holiday known as Arbor Day.
  • Mark E. Rey (MA 1976) A former timber lobbyist, Rey has been, as of 2007, undersecretary for natural resources and environment at the Agriculture Department for six years. He oversees the Forest Service.
  • Harvey S. Rosen (A.B. 1970), served as Chair of President Bush's Council of Economic Advisers. Served as the deputy assistant secretary for tax analysis in the Department of the Treasury under President George H.W. Bush from 1989 to 1991.
  • Kenneth Lee Salazar, (LAW: JD 1981), a Senator from Colorado; chief legal counsel, Governor Roy Romer of Colorado, 1986–1990; executive director, Colorado Department of Natural Resources 1990–1994; Colorado State attorney general 1999–2005; elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2004 for term beginning January 3, 2005. Appointed Secretary of the Interior in 2009.
  • Rajiv Shah (B.S.E. (economics), 1995), Formerly the Under Secretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, and Economics and Chief Scientist at the United States Department of Agriculture, Dr. Shah was sworn in on Dec 31, 2009 as the 16th Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development.
  • Edwin Forrest Sweet, (LAW: JD 1874) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; mayor of Grand Rapids 1904–1906; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-second Congress (March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1913); Assistant Secretary of Commerce 1913–1921;
  • Henry Tang, (A.B. 1976), Financial Secretary of Hong Kong; August 4, 2003–present.
  • John F. Turner (MA) reelected, in 2007, to board of directors Peabody Energy(NYSE: BTU). Turner is former United States Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES) within the State Department. Formerly President and Chief Executive Officer of the Conservation Fund, a national non-profit organization dedicated to public-private partnerships to protect land and water resources. He has also served as the Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 1989 to 1993. Served 19 years in the Wyoming State Legislature and is a past president of the Wyoming State Senate. He is also a director of International Paper and Ashland, Inc.
  • Edwin Uhl, (MA 1863) United States Secretary of State and Ambassador to Germany during the Cleveland Administration.
  • Edwin Willits, (AB 1955) a Congressional Representative from Michigan; member of the State board of education 1860–1872; appointed postmaster of Monroe January 1, 1863, by President Lincoln, and removed by President Johnson October 15, 1866; member of the commission to revise the constitution of the State in 1873; elected as a Republican to the Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, and Forty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1883); president of the Michigan Agricultural College 1885–1889; First Assistant Secretary of Agriculture from March 23, 1889, to December 31, 1893;
  • Donald C. Winter, (Ph.D. Physics 1972), President of Northrop Grumman's Mission Systems sector. Formerly President and CEO of TRW Systems. Elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2002. Appointed and confirmed as United States Secretary of the Navy in January 2006.
  • Hubert Work (MED: 1882–1884), US Interior Secretary, 1923–28

Other[edit]

References[edit]

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