List of Washington's Headquarters during the Revolutionary War

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List of Washington's Headquarters during the Revolutionary War: Buildings or locations that served as headquarters for General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War.

Background[edit]

On April 19, 1775, the militia of Massachusetts – later joined by the militias of other New England colonies – began a siege at Boston to prevent thousands of newly-arrived British troops from moving inland.

On June 14, 1775, the Second Continental Congress created a Continental Army, to be formed out of the individual militias of the Thirteen Colonies. The next day, Congress created the position of Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, and unanimously elected Washington to that position. Congress formally presented him with his commission on June 19, and he departed Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on June 23, headed for Massachusetts. He arrived at Cambridge, Massachusetts on July 2, and took command of the siege. It lasted until March 17, 1776, when the British withdrew by ship.

Washington's headquarters staff consisted of a military secretary – initially, Colonel Joseph Reed; and four aides-de-camp – initially, William Palfrey, Stephen Moylan, Richard Cary, and Robert Hanson Harrison. They managed Washington's correspondence, made copies of each day's General Orders (to be distributed to the commanding officer at each military post), and made copies of individual orders from the commander-in-chief.

Traveling with the headquarters staff (his "family") and a troop of life-guards (bodyguards), Washington tended to stay at military camps, taverns, houses belonging to Continental Army officers or sympathetic civilians, and vacant houses seized from Loyalists. His correspondence and expense accounts are useful sources for determining his location on a specific date. For instance: an expense account entry that lists meals – but not "use of house" – likely indicates that Washington and his staff pitched their tents on the owner's property.


Name Image Location/GPS Coordinates Dates Notes
Benjamin Wadsworth House[1] Wadsworth House.JPG Harvard Yard, 1341 Massachusetts Avenue,
Cambridge, Massachusetts
42°22′24″N 71°07′06″W / 42.373234°N 71.1182814°W / 42.373234; -71.1182814 (Benjamin Wadsworth House)
July 2 to 15, 1775 First of Washington's Headquarters.
July 3 – Washington takes command of the Continental Army.
John Vassall House, also known as Longfellow House
Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
Longfellow National Historic Site, Cambridge, Massachusetts.JPG 105 Brattle Street,
Cambridge, Massachusetts
42°22′36″N 71°07′35″W / 42.376667°N 71.126389°W / 42.376667; -71.126389 (Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site)
July 15, 1775 to April 4, 1776 March 17 – Siege of Boston ends with the British evacuation
of nearly 10,000 troops.
Samuel Dexter House 699 High Street,
Dedham, Massachusetts
42°15′01″N 71°10′41″W / 42.25015°N 71.17792°W / 42.25015; -71.17792 (Samuel Dexter House)
April 4 to 5, 1776 "Expenses paid ... Dexters – £9.18.7."[2]
Governor Stephen Hopkins House Hopkins.Stephen.House.2.Providence.jpg 15 Hopkins Street,
Providence, Rhode Island
41°49′18″N 71°24′12″W / 41.821667°N 71.403333°W / 41.821667; -71.403333 (Governor Stephen Hopkins House)
April 5 to 7, 1776
April 7 to 8, 1776
Leffingwell Inn
Christopher Leffingwell, proprietor
Thomas Leffingwell Inn, 348 Washington Street, Norwichtown (New London County, Connecticut).jpg 348 Washington Street,
Norwich, Connecticut
41°32′32″N 72°05′17″W / 41.542222°N 72.088056°W / 41.542222; -72.088056 (Leffingwell Inn)
April 8 to 9, 1776 Jedidiah Huntington House
Nathaniel Shaw Mansion Captain Nathaniel Shaw Mansion, 11 Blinman Street, New London (New London County, Connecticut).jpg 11 Blinman Street,
New London, Connecticut
41°21′04″N 72°05′53″W / 41.351122°N 72.098098°W / 41.351122; -72.098098 (Nathaniel Shaw Mansion)
April 9 to 10, 1776
John McCurdy House 2 McCurdy Road,
Old Lyme, Connecticut
41°18′46″N 72°19′52″W / 41.3127°N 72.3311°W / 41.3127; -72.3311 (John McCurdy House)
April 10 to 11, 1776
Sun Tavern
Samuel Penfield, proprietor
RISING SUN TAVERN, FGAIRFIELD, CT.jpg Town Hall Green,
Fairfield, Connecticut
41°08′31″N 73°14′57″W / 41.141900°N 73.249244°W / 41.141900; -73.249244 (Sun Tavern)
April 11 to 12, 1776 "Expenses paid ... Penfield's at Fairfield – £2.0.9."[3]
Destroyed by fire in 1779. Rebuilt on the same site.
Guion's Tavern Town of Eastchester Welcome Sign 2010.JPG Boston Post Road, near East 233rd Street,
Eastchester, New York
April 12 to 13, 1776 "Expenses paid ... Guion's – £2.11.8."[4]
Demolished in 1895.
William Smith House Pearl Street, opposite Cedar Street,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°42′23″N 74°00′26″W / 40.70636°N 74.00709°W / 40.70636; -74.00709 (William Smith House)
April 13 to 17, 1776 Demolished.
"Richmond Hill" (Abraham Mortier House) Richmond Hill Mansion crop.jpeg Varick & Vandam Streets,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°43′37″N 74°00′19″W / 40.726833°N 74.005278°W / 40.726833; -74.005278 (Richmond Hill (Manhattan))
April 17 to May 21, 1776 Demolished in 1849.
"Tavern at New Ark 12 Dollrs"[5] Newark, New Jersey May 21 to 22, 1776
Hudibras Tavern
Colonel Jacob Hyer, proprietor[6]
SW corner of Nassau Street & Washington Road,
Princeton, New Jersey
40°21′01″N 74°39′26″W / 40.350229°N 74.657199°W / 40.350229; -74.657199 (Hudibras Tavern)
May 22 to 23, 1776 Demolished.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 23 to June 5, 1776
White Hall Tavern[7][8]
Myndert Van Voorhees, proprietor
Albany Street, east of Neilson Street,
New Brunswick, New Jersey
40°29′50″N 74°26′28″W / 40.497286°N 74.441139°W / 40.497286; -74.441139 (White Hall Tavern)
June 5 to 6, 1776 "Expenses paid ... Minne Voorhies. Brunswic – 16 Dollrs"[9]
Returns to "Richmond Hill" (Abraham Mortier House) Richmond Hill Mansion crop.jpeg Varick & Vandam Streets,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°43′37″N 74°00′19″W / 40.726833°N 74.005278°W / 40.726833; -74.005278 (Richmond Hill (Manhattan))
June 6 to August 27, 1776 Samuel Fraunces, who provided meals here for Washington
and his staff, later claimed to have thwarted an assassination
attempt against Washington.[10]
Demolished in 1849.
Brooklyn Heights Washington at Brooklyn 1951 Issue-3cjpg.jpg Atlantic Avenue, btw. Clinton & Court Streets,
Brooklyn, New York City, New York
40°41′23″N 73°59′38″W / 40.689668°N 73.993763°W / 40.689668; -73.993763 (Washington's Headquarters, Battle of Long Island)
August 27 to 30, 1776 August 27 – Battle of Long Island
August 29-30 – Retreat to Manhattan
Manhattan, New York City, New York August 30 to September 13, 1776
Archibald Kennedy House NE corner Broadway & Battery Place,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°42′17″N 74°00′51″W / 40.7048°N 74.0142°W / 40.7048; -74.0142 (Archibald Kennedy House)
Later headquarters for British General Howe.
Robert Murray House 36th Street & 4th Avenue,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
September 13 to 14, 1776
Mott's Tavern Harlem Heights (now Morningside Heights),
Manhattan, New York City, New York
September 14 to 15, 1776
Roger Morris House, also known as
Morris-Jumel Mansion
Nyc, Morris-Jumel Mansion.JPG Jumel Terrace & West 160th Street,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°50′04″N 73°56′19″W / 40.834473°N 73.938583°W / 40.834473; -73.938583 (Morris-Jumel Mansion)
September 15 to October 21, 1776 September 16 – Battle of Harlem Heights.
Valentine's Mile Square Valentine's Hill,
Yonkers, New York
40°55′52″N 73°51′52″W / 40.931141°N 73.864349°W / 40.931141; -73.864349 (St. Joseph's Seminary)
October 21 to 22, 1776 October 22 – "Expenses at Valentine's Mile Square –
20 Dollrs"
Now the site of St. Joseph's Seminary.
Jacob Purdy House Jacob purdy historic house 080105.jpg 60 Park Avenue,
White Plains, New York
41°02′12″N 73°46′26″W / 41.036667°N 73.773889°W / 41.036667; -73.773889 (Jacob Purdy House)
October 22 to 28, 1776 October 28 – Battle of White Plains
Elijah Miller House Elijahmillerhouse.JPG Virginia Road,
North White Plains, New York
41°03′33″N 73°46′15″W / 41.059167°N 73.770833°W / 41.059167; -73.770833 (Elijah Miller House)
October 28 to November 10, 1776
Summer 1778
Summer 1781
Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House, also known as
"Upper Manor" (Pierre Van Cortlandt House)
110 Oregon Road,
Cortlandt Manor, New York
41°18′44″N 73°54′22″W / 41.312222°N 73.906111°W / 41.312222; -73.906111 (Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House)
November 10 to 12, 1776 Greatly altered.[11]
Now part of Cortlandt Healthcare Nursing Care Center.
General Green's quarters
Stephen Bourdette House
Burdett's Landing house.jpg near Burdett's Landing,
Fort Lee, New Jersey
40°50′37″N 73°58′00″W / 40.8436°N 73.9667°W / 40.8436; -73.9667 (Stephen Bourdette House)
November 12 to 15, 1776 November 12 – Washington crosses to the west side of the
Hudson River at Fort Lee.
Demolished in 1899.
Hackensack, New Jersey November 15, 1776 Washington is on his way south when he receives news of
a British threat against Fort Washington (east side of the
Hudson River). He returns to Fort Lee.[12]
Returns to General Green's quarters
Stephen Bourdette House
A plan of the operations of the King's army, Chevaux de Frise between Fort Lee and Fort Washington, detail.jpg near Burdett's Landing,
Fort Lee, New Jersey
40°50′37″N 73°58′00″W / 40.8436°N 73.9667°W / 40.8436; -73.9667 (Stephen Bourdette House)
November 15 to 18, 1776 November 16 – Battle of Fort Washington.
From the New Jersey side of the Hudson River, Washington
can see the British attack, but cannot risk sending
reinforcements on a daylight crossing. He abandons plans for a
night crossing when boats of retreating soldiers begin arriving.
Peter Zabriskie Mansion Washington Mansion House Tavern Hackensack NJ HABS.jpg 50 Main Street,
Hackensack, New Jersey
40°52′47″N 74°02′38″W / 40.879608°N 74.043789°W / 40.879608; -74.043789 (Peter Zabriskie Mansion)
November 18 to 21, 1776 Confiscated from Loyalist Peter Zabriskie.
Demolished in 1945.[13]
Tap House Tavern
James Leslie, proprietor[14]
River Road,
Passaic, New Jersey
40°51′19″N 74°07′16″W / 40.855222°N 74.121035°W / 40.855222; -74.121035 (Tap House Tavern)
November 21 to 22, 1776 Later renamed Blanchard House.
Destroyed by fire in 1877.
Eagle Tavern Bergen & Glenwood Avenues,
Newark, New Jersey
40°43′35″N 74°04′05″W / 40.72626°N 74.06818°W / 40.72626; -74.06818 (Eagle Tavern)
November 22 to 28, 1776 Demolished in 1829.
Returns to White Hall Tavern[15]
Myndert Van Voorhees, proprietor
Albany Street, east of Neilson Street,
New Brunswick, New Jersey
40°29′50″N 74°26′28″W / 40.497286°N 74.441139°W / 40.497286; -74.441139 (White Hall Tavern)
November 28 to December 1, 1776
Kingston, New Jersey December 1 to 2, 1776
Princeton, New Jersey December 2 to 3, 1776
Trenton, New Jersey December 3 to 8, 1776 December 8 – The Army crosses to the west side of the
Delaware River at Trenton.
"Summerseat" (Thomas Barclay House) Summerseat, Clymer Street & Morris Avenue (Morrisville Borough), Morrisville (Bucks County, Pennsylvania).jpg Clymer Street & Morris Avenue,
Morrisville, Pennsylvania
40°12′29″N 74°46′47″W / 40.2080879°N 74.7795874°W / 40.2080879; -74.7795874 (Summerseat (Morrisville, Pennsylvania))
December 8 to 14, 1776
William Keith House Keith House, Upper Makefield PA.JPG Pineville Road,
Upper Makefield Township, Pennsylvania
40°17′44″N 74°56′49″W / 40.295556°N 74.946944°W / 40.295556; -74.946944 (Keith House-Washington's Headquarters)
December 14 to 24, 1776
Thompson-Neely House Thompson-Neely (Pidcock) House.jpg River Road,
Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania
40°19′50″N 74°56′14″W / 40.330495°N 74.937133°W / 40.330495; -74.937133 (Thompson-Neely House)
December 24 to 25, 1776
Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze, MMA-NYC, 1851.jpg December 25 – Washington's Crossing of the Delaware.
December 26 – Battle of Trenton.
John Harris House Newtown, PA Keystone Marker.jpg Sycamore Street & Swamp Road,
Newtown, Pennsylvania
40°13′44″N 74°56′20″W / 40.2289869°N 74.9388018°W / 40.2289869; -74.9388018 (John Harris House)
December 26 to 30, 1776 Demolished in 1863.
A gas station now occupies the site.
John Barnes House Major John Barnes's House from Battles of Trenton 1898.jpg Greene Street,
Trenton, New Jersey
December 30, 1776 to January 1, 1777 Demolished.
True American Inn
Jonathan Richmond, proprietor
Jonathan Richmond's Tavern from Battles of Trenton 1898.jpg Broad Street, south of the bridge,
Trenton, New Jersey
40°13′04″N 74°45′49″W / 40.2177°N 74.7637°W / 40.2177; -74.7637 (True American Inn)
January 1 to 2, 1777 Destroyed by fire in 1843.
Alexander Douglass House The Douglass House from Battles of Trenton 1898.jpg 478 Centre Street,
Trenton, New Jersey
40°12′21″N 74°45′29″W / 40.205865°N 74.758111°W / 40.205865; -74.758111 (Alexander Douglass House)
January 2 to 3, 1777 January 2 – Battle of the Assunpink Creek
Demolished.
George Washington at Princeton.jpg Princeton, New Jersey January 3 – Battle of Princeton.
John Van Doren House John Van Doren House Millstone New Jersey HABS109828pv.jpg Millstone River Road,
Millstone, New Jersey
40°29′46″N 74°35′16″W / 40.4961°N 74.5879°W / 40.4961; -74.5879 (John Van Doren House)
January 3 to 4, 1777
John Fenner House[16] John Fenner House Pluckemin Somerset County NJ HABS.jpg NJ State Route 206,
Pluckemin, New Jersey
40°38′44″N 74°38′22″W / 40.64556°N 74.63944°W / 40.64556; -74.63944 (John Fenner House)
January 4 to 6, 1777[17] Demolished in 1940.[18]
Arnold's Tavern
Jacob Arnold, proprietor
THE GREEN, MORRISTOWN DISTRICT, MORRIS COUNTY.jpg 20 North Park Place, Morristown Green,
Morristown, New Jersey
40°47′51″N 74°28′54″W / 40.7973796°N 74.4815604°W / 40.7973796; -74.4815604 (Arnold's Tavern)
January 6 to May 29, 1777 Destroyed by fire in 1918.
Encampment Middlebrook, New Jersey May 29 to June 24, 1777[19] “The Army is now drawn together at this place, at least that
part of it, which have been Cantoned all Winter in this state.
The whole of them now Encamped in Comfortable Tents on a
Valley covered in front and rear by ridges which affords us
security. His excellency our good Old General, has also
spread his Tent, and lives amongst us."[20]
Nathaniel Drake House NathanielDrakeHouse.jpg 602 West Front Street,
Quibbletown (now Plainfield), New Jersey
40°36′49″N 74°25′56″W / 40.613611°N 74.432222°W / 40.613611; -74.432222 (Nathaniel Drake House)
June 24 to 26, 1777[21] June 26 – Battle of Short Hills.
Encampment Middlebrook, New Jersey June 26 to July 3, 1777[22]
Liberty Corner Tavern
Bullion, proprietor
Morristown, New Jersey July 3 to 11, 1777 July 3 – Expenses paid at Bullion's Tavern – £3.
July 11 – Expenses paid to Mr. Hathaway – £5.12.6.
Colonel William Colfax House[23] Schuyler-Colfax House.jpg 2343 Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike,
Pompton (now Wayne), New Jersey
40°59′15″N 74°16′47″W / 40.9875°N 74.279722°W / 40.9875; -74.279722 (Schuyler-Colfax House)
July 11 to 14, 1777[24] July 14 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Van Twiller – £5.12.11.
Hendrick Van Allen House[25] Ramapo Valley Road & Franklin Avenue,
Oakland, New Jersey
41°01′47″N 74°14′11″W / 41.029722°N 74.236389°W / 41.029722; -74.236389 (Van Allen House)
July 14 to 15, 1777 July 14 – "Vanaulens 8 Miles from Pumpton Plains ... I
arrived here this Afternoon with the Army after a very fatiguing
March"[26]
Suffern's Tavern
John Suffern, proprietor
Washington Avenue Soldiers' Monument.jpg Washington & Lafayette Avenues,
The Clove (now Suffern), New York
41°06′54″N 74°08′58″W / 41.11511°N 74.14935°W / 41.11511; -74.14935 (Suffern's Tavern)
July 15 to 20, 1777 July 15 – "I have just arrived with the Army at this place where
I shall remain till I see what turn Genl Howe takes."[27]
Demolished.
Galloway's Tavern
George Galloway, proprietor[28]
At Southfield, Erie Railway, by E. & H.T. Anthony (Firm).png Old Clove Road (now NY State Route 17),
Galloway (now Southfields), New York
41°14′41″N 74°10′34″W / 41.244792°N 74.176026°W / 41.244792; -74.176026 (Galloway's Tavern)
July 20 to 23, 1777 July 22 – Expenses paid to “Mr. Galloway for house Room &c.
– £4.5."[29]
Ramapo, New York July 23 to 25, 1777 July 25 – "cash paid at Ramapaugh for house room &c.
– £2.5."[30]
Abraham Lott House South Beverwyck Road
Troy Hills, New Jersey
July 25, 1777 "Mr Lott’s, 8 Miles East of Morris Town"[31]
Demolished.
Mandeville Morristown, New Jersey July 26 to 28, 1777 July 26 – Expenses paid “at Mandevils for house room &c.
– £2.5."[32]
Colonel John Mehelm House New Bromley Road,
Readington, New Jersey
40°38′16″N 74°45′29″W / 40.6379163°N 74.7579738°W / 40.6379163; -74.7579738 (Colonel John Mehelm House)
July 28 to 29, 1777 "4 Miles East of Flemingtown"[33]
The nearby White House Tavern held a store of food for the
army.[34]
July 29 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Lowry – £1.2.6.
Destroyed by fire in the 1960s.
John Holcombe House[35] Holcombe House, Lambertville, Hunterdon County, NJ HABS.jpg North Main Street (NJ State Route 29),
Coryell's Ferry (now Lambertville), New Jersey
40°22′49″N 74°56′54″W / 40.380315°N 74.948227°W / 40.380315; -74.948227 (Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead Museum)
July 29 to 31, 1777 British General Howe and 15,000 troops sail from New York
City at the end of July. Washington moves his Army to
Lambertville to be able to counter, north or south, depending
on Howe's destination. Howe sails into the Chesapeake Bay,
lands at Head of Elk, and begins a march toward Philadelphia.
Holcombe is paid £5.10 for 22 suppers and 22 breakfasts.[36]
Now Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead Museum.
City Tavern
Daniel Smith, proprietor
CityTavern-Philly.png 138 South 2nd Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
39°56′49″N 75°08′42″W / 39.947°N 75.145°W / 39.947; -75.145 (City Tavern)
July 31 to August 1, 1777[37]
Chester, Pennsylvania August 1 to 2, 1777
Returns to City Tavern
Daniel Smith, proprietor
CityTavern-Philly.png 138 South 2nd Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
39°56′49″N 75°08′42″W / 39.947°N 75.145°W / 39.947; -75.145 (City Tavern)
August 2 to 4, 1777 August 2 – Washington first meets the Marquis de Lafayette.
Expenses paid to Mr. Smith – £263.4.[38]
Colonel Henry Hill House Indian Queen Lane,
Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
August 4 to 8, 1777 Expenses paid to Col. Hill's servants – £0.17.6.
Demolished in 1780.
Encampment Crooked Billet historical marker.jpg near Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania August 8 to 10, 1777 August 10 – Washington and staff dine at the Crooked Billet
Tavern in Hatboro, en route to the Moland House.[39]
John Moland House Moland House 01.JPG "The Cross Roads,"[40] Old York Road,

Warwick Township, Pennsylvania
40°14′10″N 75°05′34″W / 40.236111°N 75.092778°W / 40.236111; -75.092778 (Moland House)

August 10 to 23, 1777 August 20 – Washington first meets Count Casimir Pulaski of
Poland, who volunteers to join the American cavalry.
August 23 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Moland – £5.5.0.
Stenton Stenton-mansion.png 4601 North 18th Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
40°01′26″N 75°09′17″W / 40.023778°N 75.154611°W / 40.023778; -75.154611 (Stenton (house))
August 23 to 24, 1777
Rudolph's Tavern[41] Chester Pike & Springfield Road,
Darby Township, Pennsylvania
39°55′06″N 75°15′47″W / 39.91821°N 75.263013°W / 39.91821; -75.263013 (Rudulph's Tavern)
August 24 to 25, 1777 August 24 – "Expenses paid Mr Rudulph at Derby for his
Excellency & family – $16."[42]
George Forsythe House (Quaker Hill) West Street, btw. 3rd & 4th Streets,
Wilmington, Delaware
39°44′29″N 75°33′17″W / 39.741357°N 75.55472°W / 39.741357; -75.55472 (Quaker Hill)
August 25 to 26, 1777 Demolished.
"The Hermitage" (Robert Alexander House) Gray's Hill, Hermitage Drive,
near Elkton, Maryland
39°36′43″N 75°49′16″W / 39.61197°N 75.82105°W / 39.61197; -75.82105 (Robert Alexander House)
August 26 to 27, 1777 The day after Washington's departure, British General Howe
makes the Alexander House his headquarters.
Returns to George Forsythe House (Quaker Hill) West Street, btw. 3rd & 4th Streets,
Wilmington, Delaware
39°44′29″N 75°33′17″W / 39.741357°N 75.55472°W / 39.741357; -75.55472 (Quaker Hill)
August 27 to September 6, 1777 August 27 – Expenses paid to George Forsyth – £63.12.0.
September 3 – Battle of Cooch's Bridge.
Demolished.
Christiana Hundred,
Newport, Delaware
September 6 to 9, 1777[43] Expenses "paid at Christiana for family's breakfast, horses &c.
– £6.5."[44]
Expenses "paid on the road from thence to Wilmington for
lodging &c. – £6."[45]
Hale-Byrnes House Hale-Byrnes House.jpg Delaware Route 7 & Delaware Route 4,
Stanton, Delaware
39°42′04″N 75°39′02″W / 39.701111°N 75.650556°W / 39.701111; -75.650556 (Hale-Byrnes House)
September 6, 1777 "The General officers are to meet at 5 O'clock this afternoon
at the brick house by White-Clay creek, and fix upon proper
picquets for the security of the camp."[46]
Wilmington, Delaware September 9, 1777 Expenses "paid for breakfast the morning we crossed
brandywine – £1.12."[47]
Benjamin Ring House Brandywine Battlefield Washington Headquarters.jpg Brandywine Battlefield,
Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania
39°52′27″N 75°34′47″W / 39.874278°N 75.579611°W / 39.874278; -75.579611 (Benjamin Ring House)
September 9 to 11, 1777 September 9 – Council of War.
Woundedatbrandywine.jpg September 11 – Battle of Brandywine.
John McIlvane House Leiperville (now Woodlyn), Pennsylvania September 11 to 12, 1777
Darby, Pennsylvania September 12 to 13, 1777
Returns to Henry Hill House[48] Indian Queen Lane
Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
September 13 to 14, 1777
Buck Tavern
Mary Miller, proprietor[49]
Lancaster Pike & Old Buck Road,
Haverford, Pennsylvania
40°01′01″N 75°18′35″W / 40.01703°N 75.30966°W / 40.01703; -75.30966 (Buck Tavern)
September 14 to 15, 1777 September 14 – The Army crosses to the west side of the
Schuylkill River at Conshohocken.
Demolished circa 1965.
A car dealership now occupies the site.
Joseph (Randall?) Malin House Conestoga & Swedesford Roads,
Malvern, Pennsylvania
40°02′50″N 75°32′20″W / 40.0471888°N 75.5387792°W / 40.0471888; -75.5387792 (Joseph Malin House)
September 15 to 16, 1777 September 16 – Battle of the Clouds
Yellow Springs Tavern YellowSpringsTavern.jpeg Yellow Springs & Art School Roads,
Yellow Springs, Pennsylvania
40°06′02″N 75°37′23″W / 40.1004589°N 75.6230205°W / 40.1004589; -75.6230205 (Yellow Springs Tavern)
September 16 to 18, 1777 Demolished by 1824. Rebuilt on the same site.
Warwick Furnace Farms Warwick Farmhouse.JPG Warwick Furnace Road,
Knauertown, Pennsylvania
40°09′00″N 75°44′18″W / 40.1500975°N 75.7383027°W / 40.1500975; -75.7383027 (Warwick Furnace)
September 18 to 19, 1777
Parker's Ford Tavern[50] 1806 Old Schuylkill Road,
Parker Ford, Pennsylvania
40°11′54″N 75°34′51″W / 40.198445°N 75.580744°W / 40.198445; -75.580744 (Parker's Ford Tavern)
September 19, 1777 September 19 – The Army crosses to the east side of the
Schuylkill River at Parker's Ford. This is followed by a night
march to Fatland Ford and Swede's Ford.
"Fatland" (James Vaux House) Fatland Ford Mansion - Audubon.jpg Pawlings Road,
Lower Providence Township, Pennsylvania
40°07′09″N 75°26′35″W / 40.1191254°N 75.4431288°W / 40.1191254; -75.4431288 (Fatland)
September 19 to 20, 1777 September 19 – Expenses paid at “Flat Land ford” for
“Breakfasts &c. – £2.5.0."[51]
Demolished. Rebuilt on the same site.
Derrick Casselberry House 275 Evansburg Road,
Evansburg, Pennsylvania
40°10′57″N 75°25′40″W / 40.18254°N 75.4277884°W / 40.18254; -75.4277884 (Derrick Casselberry House)
September 20 to 21, 1777 after midnight September 21 – Paoli Massacre
Thompson's (Thomson's) Tavern
Archibald Thomson, proprietor
Ridge Pike (Reading Road) & Egypt Road,
West Norriton Township, Pennsylvania
evening of September 21, 1777 Night march to Pottsgrove
"Pottsgrove" (John Potts Mansion) Pottsgrove Manor.JPG High Street (Reading Road),
Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania
40°14′52″N 75°39′35″W / 40.247778°N 75.659722°W / 40.247778; -75.659722 (Pottsgrove Mansion)
September 21 to 23, 1777 With his army at Valley Forge, British General Howe begins
moving troops north to trick Washington into thinking that his
goal is to capture the American military stores at Reading.
When Washington moves his army north to defend Reading,
Howe moves his army south, and captures Philadelphia.
Mr. Kennedy's House Ridge Pike (Reading Road),
northwest of Trappe, Pennsylvania
September 22 to 23, 1777 "Camp 28 miles from Philada on the Reading Road"[52]
September 22 – "Expenses paid at Mr Kenedys for Sundries
& trouble of the house – £3.10."[53]
Colonel Frederick Antes House Antes House Montco PA.jpg Colonial Road,
Upper Frederick Township, Pennsylvania
40°17′32″N 75°32′26″W / 40.292222°N 75.540556°W / 40.292222; -75.540556 (Henry Antes House)
September 23 to 26, 1777 "Camp on Schuylkill 34 Miles from Philadelphia"[54]
September 23 – Expenses paid at Mr Antes – £10.12.6.[55]
Henry Keely House[56]
(west side of the Perkiomen Creek)
Pennypacker Mills 1 Montco PA.jpg North Limerick Road,
southwest of Schwenksville, Pennsylvania
40°14′57″N 75°28′05″W / 40.2491412°N 75.4680425°W / 40.2491412; -75.4680425 (Henry Keely House)
September 26 to 29, 1777 The Army camps on the east side of the Perkiomen Creek, at
Pennypacker Mills.
September 26 – Philadelphia is captured by the British, who
occupy the city until June 18, 1778.
September 29 – Expenses paid “at Paulins mill for Sundries
used in the house—& extra trouble – £5.10.0.”[57]
Demolished in 1834.
Jacob Smith House Hedrick Road,
Skippack, Pennsylvania
40°13′24″N 75°22′55″W / 40.223286°N 75.381828°W / 40.223286; -75.381828 (Jacob Smith House)
September 29 to October 2, 1777 October 2 – Expenses paid at Mr. Smiths – £14.4.6.[58]
Demolished in the 1970s.
Peter Wentz Homestead Peter Wentz Homestead 01.JPG Skippack Pike & Shearer Road,
Worcester Township, Pennsylvania
40°11′56″N 75°20′02″W / 40.198889°N 75.333889°W / 40.198889; -75.333889 (Peter Wentz Homestead)
October 2 to 4, 1777 October 4 – Expenses paid to Mathias Wentz – £2.10.[59]
Germantown.jpg October 4, 1777 Battle of Germantown
Returns to Henry Keely House
(west side of the Perkiomen Creek)
Pennypacker Mills 1 Montco PA.jpg North Limerick Road,
southwest of Schwenksville, Pennsylvania
40°14′57″N 75°28′05″W / 40.2491412°N 75.4680425°W / 40.2491412; -75.4680425 (Henry Keely House)
October 4 to 8, 1777 The Army camps on the east side of the Perkiomen Creek, at
Pennypacker Mills.[60]
October 8 – Expenses paid “at Picaomin for necessaries used
in the house–bread; potatoes–Milk–fouls–&c. & trouble”
– £5.[61]
Demolished in 1834.
Frederick Wampole (Friedrick Wamboldt) House Detwiler Road,
Towamencin Township, Pennsylvania
40°15′35″N 75°20′59″W / 40.259841°N 75.3498511°W / 40.259841; -75.3498511 (Frederick Wampole House)
October 9 to 16, 1777 October 15 – Expenses paid "Mr Wambol – £28.5.4."[62]
Demolished in 1881.
Returns to Peter Wentz Homestead Peter Wentz Homestead 01.JPG Skippack Pike & Shearer Road,
Worcester Township, Pennsylvania
40°11′56″N 75°20′02″W / 40.198889°N 75.333889°W / 40.198889; -75.333889 (Peter Wentz Homestead)
October 16 to 20, 1777 October 19 – Expenses paid to Mathias Wentz – £8.16.1.[63]
"Dawesfield" (James Morris House) DAWESFIELD.jpg Lewis Lane,
Whitpain Township, Pennsylvania
40°09′12″N 75°14′53″W / 40.153333°N 75.248056°W / 40.153333; -75.248056 (Dawesfield)
October 20 to November 2, 1777
George Emlen House EMLEN HOUSE, FT. WASHNGTON, MONTGOMERY COUNTY.jpg Pennsylvania Avenue,
Upper Dublin Township, Pennsylvania
40°07′29″N 75°11′23″W / 40.124736°N 75.189591°W / 40.124736; -75.189591 (George Emlen House)
November 2 to December 11, 1777 December 5-8 – Battle of White Marsh
Swede's Ford Norristown, Pennsylvania December 11 to 13, 1777[64] December 11 – Battle of Matson's Ford
Isaac Hughes House Gulph Rock.JPG Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania December 13 to 19, 1777 December 18 – “[T]his is Thanksgiving Day thro the whole
Continent of America—but god knows We have very Little to
keep it with this being the third Day we have been without
flouer or bread—& are Living on a high uncultivated hill, in huts
& tents Laying on the Cold Ground, upon the whole I think all
we have to be thankful for is that we are alive & not in the
Grave with many of our friends—we had for thanksgiving
breakfast some Exceeding Poor beef which has been boil.d &
Now warm.d in an old short handled frying Pan in which we
ware Obliged to Eat it haveing No other Platter—"[65]
Isaac Potts House
(occupied by Deborah Potts Hewes)
Washington's Headquarters Valley Forge.jpg PA State Route 23 & Valley Creek Road,
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
40°06′05″N 75°27′43″W / 40.101389°N 75.461944°W / 40.101389; -75.461944 (Washington's Headquarters (Valley Forge))
December 19, 1777 to June 19, 1778 June 19 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Hewes – £100.
"Doctor Shennons" (Dr. Robert Shannon House) Germantown Pike & Whitehall Road,
East Norriton Township, Pennsylvania
40°09′02″N 75°20′52″W / 40.150453°N 75.347692°W / 40.150453; -75.347692 (Robert Shannon Farm)
June 19 to 20, 1778 June 20 – Expenses paid to Dr. Shannon – £10.17.6.[66]
Now part of Norristown Farm Park.[67]
Jonathan Fell House East State Street,
Doylestown, Pennsylvania
40°18′47″N 75°07′08″W / 40.313004°N 75.118760°W / 40.313004; -75.118760 (Jonathan Fell House)
June 20 to 21, 1778 June 20 – Expenses "paid Jno Fell for Breakfast dinner & sup.
for the General & suite – £6."[68]
Returns to John Holcombe House Holcombe House, Lambertville, Hunterdon County, NJ HABS.jpg North Main Street (NJ State Route 29),
Coryell's Ferry (now Lambertville), New Jersey
40°22′49″N 74°56′54″W / 40.380315°N 74.948227°W / 40.380315; -74.948227 (Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead Museum)
June 21 to 23, 1778 June 21 – Washington crosses to the New Jersey side of the
Delaware River, but most of the Army camps on the west side
(New Hope, Pennsylvania), and crosses the following day.
June 22 – Expenses paid to Mr. Holcombe – £10.17.6.
John Hunt House[69] Province Line Road, Sourland Mountain,
Hopewell, New Jersey
40°24′33″N 74°44′45″W / 40.409252°N 74.745735°W / 40.409252; -74.745735 (John Hunt House)
June 23 to 25, 1778 June 24 – Council of War.
June 25 – Expenses paid Mr Hunt “for Sundries” – £10.2.6.[70]
Captain Thomas Wetherill House Georges Road,
near Kingston, New Jersey
40°22′03″N 74°30′27″W / 40.367416°N 74.507607°W / 40.367416; -74.507607 (Wetherill Mount House)
June 25 to 26, 1778 Expenses paid "To Thos Wetheral the morning after we left
Kingston – £14."
Dr. Hezekiah Stites House 53 South Main Street,
Cranbury, New Jersey
40°18′19″N 74°31′09″W / 40.3052624°N 74.5191278°W / 40.3052624; -74.5191278 (Dr. Hezekiah Stites House)
June 26 to 27, 1778 Expenses paid to Dr. Stites – $9.[71]
Demolished.
Encampment Penelopen (now Manalapan), New Jersey June 27 to 28, 1778
BattleofMonmouth.jpg Monmouth Courthouse, New Jersey June 28, 1778 June 28 – Battle of Monmouth
Moses Laird House Main Street & Hamilton Road,
Englishtown, New Jersey
40°17′47″N 74°21′30″W / 40.2964131°N 74.3583716°W / 40.2964131; -74.3583716 (Moses Laird House),
June 29 to 30, 1778
Village Inn Village Inn Englishtown NJ c1996.jpg Main & Water Streets,
Englishtown, New Jersey
40°17′50″N 74°21′31″W / 40.2970877°N 74.3587112°W / 40.2970877; -74.3587112 (Village Inn)
June 30, 1778 Court-martial of General Charles Lee begins.
Anthony White House Buccleuch Mansion New Brunswick NJ.jpg 800 George Street,
New Brunswick, New Jersey
40°30′18″N 74°27′37″W / 40.505°N 74.460278°W / 40.505; -74.460278 (Buccleuch Mansion)
July 1 to 7, 1778[72] July 2 – Court-martial of General Charles Lee continues.
Scotch Plains, New Jersey July 7 to 8, 1778
July 8 to 9, 1778
Colonel Thomas Cadmus House Ashland Avenue & Washington Street,
Bloomfield, New Jersey
40°47′33″N 74°12′17″W / 40.7926351°N 74.2046507°W / 40.7926351; -74.2046507 (Thomas Cadmus House)
July 9 to 10, 1778 Demolished circa 1915. Rebuilt on the same site.
Great Falls (Passaic River) PownallPassaicFalls.jpg Paterson, New Jersey July 10, 1778 Washington, Hamilton, Lafayette & aide-de-camp James
McHenry visit Great Falls.[73]
"The Hermitage" (Theodosia Prevost House) Hermitage-rear.jpg 335 North Franklin Turnpike,
Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey
41°00′25″N 74°07′00″W / 41.00703°N 74.116629°W / 41.00703; -74.116629 (The Hermitage)
July 10 to 15, 1778[74] July 14 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Prevost's servants – £4.10.
July 15 – Expenses paid to Jacob Hardin – £3.8.
Colonel Udney Hay House Haverstraw, New York July 15 to 18, 1778 Crossing to east side of Hudson River at King's Ferry.
July 16 – Washington inspects fortifications at West Point.[75]
Captain Samuel Delavan House Hallock’s Mill Road
Yorktown, New York
July 18 to 19, 1778 July 18 – Expenses paid to Mr. Delavan – £10.
Demolished.
Colonel Joseph Drake House Pelham Road & Drake Avenue,
New Rochelle, New York
40°53′40″N 73°47′03″W / 40.8945371°N 73.7840913°W / 40.8945371; -73.7840913 (Drake Manor)
July 19 to 20, 1778 July 19 – "Drakes Farm"[76]
Wright's Mills Mount Kisko Road,
Valhalla, New York[77]
41°05′20″N 73°45′03″W / 41.0888°N 73.7509°W / 41.0888; -73.7509 (Wright's Mills)
July 20 to 27, 1778[78] July 25 – Council of War.
July 28 – Expenses paid to Reuben Wright – £30.18.10.
Demolished.
Returns to Jacob Purdy House Jacob purdy historic house 080105.jpg 60 Park Avenue,
White Plains, New York
41°02′12″N 73°46′26″W / 41.036667°N 73.773889°W / 41.036667; -73.773889 (Jacob Purdy House)
July 27 to September 16, 1778[79]
Raymond House[80] Bedford, New York September 16 to 18, 1778[81][82]
Colonel Stephen Moore House, also known as
"The Red House" or "Moore's Folly"
WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
September 18 to 19, 1778 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Mandeville's Tavern
Jacob Mandeville, proprietor
Mandeville House, Garrison, NY.jpg Lower Station Road,
Garrison, New York
41°22′36″N 73°56′42″W / 41.376667°N 73.945000°W / 41.376667; -73.945000 (Mandeville House)
September 19 to 20, 1778 September 19 – Expenses paid to Jacob Mandeville
– £9.12.0.
"Faris's" (Reed Ferris House) Detail of 1778 Erskine Map of Quaker Hill.jpg Old Quaker Hill Road, south of Brady Brook,[83]
Pawling, New York
41°33′05″N 73°32′55″W / 41.55138°N 73.54874°W / 41.55138; -73.54874 (Reed Ferris House)
September 20 to 26, 1778[84][85] September 25 – Expenses paid to "Reed Ferriss" for "House
Rent" and "Lodging" – £20.1.0.[86]
Demolished.
Image: The Ferris property appears on the map, below center.
John Kane House John Kane House, Pawling, NY.jpg East Main Street,
Fredericksburg (now Pawling), New York
41°33′22″N 73°35′39″W / 41.556111°N 73.594167°W / 41.556111; -73.594167 (John Kane House)
September 26 to 30, 1778[87]
John Brinckerhoff House Colonel John Brinckerhoff House, State Route 82, Brinckerhoff, Dutchess County, NY.jpg Fishkill, New York September 30 to October 8, 1778 October 8 – "I shall this afternoon return to my old Quarters at
Mr Kanes Fredericsburg–"[88]
Returns to John Kane House John Kane House, Pawling, NY.jpg East Main Street,
Fredericksburg (now Pawling), New York
41°33′22″N 73°35′39″W / 41.556111°N 73.594167°W / 41.556111; -73.594167 (John Kane House)
October 8 to November 10, 1778[89]
Poughkeepsie, New York November 10, 1778
Returns to John Kane House John Kane House, Pawling, NY.jpg East Main Street,
Fredericksburg (now Pawling), New York
41°33′22″N 73°35′39″W / 41.556111°N 73.594167°W / 41.556111; -73.594167 (John Kane House)
November 11 to 28, 1778[90] November 28 – Expenses "paid John Kane for use of his
house, &c." – £57.12.0.
Philipsburg (now Hartsdale), New York[91] November 28 to 29, 1778[92]
"Mr Lents" - Thomas Storm House, also known as
Storm-Adriance-Brinckerhoff House
Storm-Adriance-Brinckerhoff House.jpg Fishkill, New York
41°35′47″N 73°45′40″W / 41.596389°N 73.761111°W / 41.596389; -73.761111 (Storm-Adriance-Brinckerhoff House)
November 29 to December 1, 1778. December 1 – The Army crosses to the west side of the
Hudson River at King's Ferry.[93]
Returns to Colonel Udney Hay House Haverstraw, New York December 1 to 2, 1778[94]
"Mr. Jones Baggat" Ramapo, New York December 2 to 3, 1778[95]
"Mr Goods" Pequannock, New Jersey December 3 to 4, 1778[96]
Returns to Abraham Lott House South Beverwyck Road
Troy Hills, New Jersey
December 4 to 5, 1778[97] Demolished.
Morristown, New Jersey December 5 to 6, 1778[98]
Paramus, New Jersey December 5 to 8, 1778
Elizabeth, New Jersey December 8 to 11, 1778
John Wallace House WallaceHouse.Somerville.NJ.jpg 71 Somerset Street,
Middlebrook (now Somerville), New Jersey
40°34′08″N 74°37′19″W / 40.568889°N 74.621944°W / 40.568889; -74.621944 (Wallace House (Somerville, New Jersey))
December 11 to 21, 1778
December 21 to 22, 1778
Henry Laurens House State-House Birch's Views Plate 21.jpg
North side of Chestnut Street,
between 4th & 5th Streets,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
December 22, 1778 to February 2, 1779 Congress summons Washington to Philadelphia, where he
spends 6 weeks as the guest of President of Congress
Henry Laurens. Martha Washington joins him in the city, and
accompanies him back to Middlebrook.[99]
Demolished in the mid-19th century.
Image: The Henry Laurens House is in the background, left.
February 2
February 3
February 4
Returns to John Wallace House WallaceHouse.Somerville.NJ.jpg 71 Somerset Street,
Middlebrook (now Somerville), New Jersey
40°34′08″N 74°37′19″W / 40.568889°N 74.621944°W / 40.568889; -74.621944 (Wallace House (Somerville, New Jersey))
February 5 to June 4, 1779 June 4 – “Received of Major Gibbs one thousand dollars for
the use of my house Furniture &c. &c. which His Excellency
General Washington had for his Head quarters – John
Wallace.”[100]
Pompton, New Jersey June 4 to 5, 1779
Robert Erskine House Ringwood2.jpg Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood Manor State Park,
Ringwood, New Jersey
41°08′40″N 74°15′10″W / 41.144444°N 74.252778°W / 41.144444; -74.252778 (Ringwood Manor)
June 5 to 6, 1779[101] Demolished by 1810. Rebuilt on the same site.
Sloat House Sloat House, Sloatsburg, NY.jpg NY State Route 17 & Sterling Avenue,
Sloatsburg, New York
41°09′06″N 74°11′38″W / 41.151687°N 74.193889°W / 41.151687; -74.193889 (Sloat House)
June 6 to 7, 1779[102]
Francis Smith's Tavern Smith's Clove (now Woodbury), New York June 7 to 14, 1779
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
June 15 to 19, 1779 June 18 – Washington visits Fishkill, New York
Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Returns to Smith's Clove June 19 to 21, 1779[103] June 19 – Expenses paid to Francis Smith for 22 dinners
– £15.4.0.
Colonel Thomas Ellison House River Road,
New Windsor, New York
41°28′23″N 74°00′55″W / 41.472976°N 74.015286°W / 41.472976; -74.015286 (Colonel Thomas Ellison House)
June 24 to July 21, 1779[104] Demolished.
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
July 21 to November 28, 1779 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Returns to Mandeville's Tavern
Jacob Mandeville, proprietor
Mandeville House, Garrison, NY.jpg Lower Station Road,
Garrison, New York
41°22′36″N 73°56′42″W / 41.376667°N 73.945000°W / 41.376667; -73.945000 (Mandeville House)
July 26, 1779 Expenses "to cash paid at Mandevils for house–rooms &c.
– £2.5.0."
Returns to Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House 110 Oregon Road,
Cortlandt Manor, New York
41°18′44″N 73°54′22″W / 41.312222°N 73.906111°W / 41.312222; -73.906111 (Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House)
November 28 to 30 1779
Jacob Ford Mansion Ford Mansion.gif 30 Washington Place,
Morristown, New Jersey
40°47′52″N 74°27′55″W / 40.797795°N 74.465203°W / 40.797795; -74.465203 (Ford Mansion)
December 1, 1779 to June 7, 1780 "December 31st. Lady Washington arrived at Head Quarters
at Morristown."[105]
Briant's Tavern
Jacob Briant, proprietor
Broad Street & New Jersey Route 24,
Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey
40°43′04″N 74°19′56″W / 40.7177958°N 74.3321648°W / 40.7177958; -74.3321648 (Briant's Tavern)
June 7 to 22, 1780 June 7 – Battle of Connecticut Farms
June 22 – Expenses paid to Jacob Briant – $800.
Demolished.
Rockaway Bridge Rockaway Township, New Jersey June 23, 1780 June 23 – Battle of Springfield
Henry Doremus House[106] DOREMUS HOUSE.jpg Main Road & Heritage Court,
Whippany (now Montville), New Jersey
40°55′06″N 74°21′15″W / 40.918358°N 74.354192°W / 40.918358; -74.354192 (Henry Doremus House)
June 24 to 27, 1780 June 25 – Expenses paid to Uzal Coe – $180
June 25 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Doremus – $40.
Isaac Vanderbeck House Preakness, New Jersey June 27 to 29, 1780 Expenses paid to Isaac Vanderbeck – $452.
Mr. Hopper Ramapo (now Mahwah), New Jersey June 29 to July 1, 1780 Expenses paid to Mr. Hopper – $200.
Passaic, New Jersey
Colonel Theunis Dey Mansion Dey Mansion 1.JPG 199 Totowa Road,
Wayne, New Jersey
40°54′56″N 74°14′00″W / 40.915556°N 74.233333°W / 40.915556; -74.233333 (Dey Mansion)
July 1 to 29, 1780 July 29 – Expenses paid to Col. Dey's servants – $50.
Beverley Robinson House
(headquarters of General Benedict Arnold)
Appletons' Arnold Benedict - Beverley Robinson house.jpg Garrison, New York (opposite West Point)
41°21′54″N 73°56′59″W / 41.36493333°N 73.94975°W / 41.36493333; -73.94975 (Beverley Robinson House)
July 30 to 31, 1780
Daniel Birdsall House 979 Main Street,
Peekskill, New York
41°17′29″N 73°55′13″W / 41.2914958°N 73.9202865°W / 41.2914958; -73.9202865 (Daniel Birdsall House)
July 31 to August 6, 1780 Demolished.
A restaurant opposite the site is named "Birdsall House."
Verplank's Point, New York August 6 to 7, 1780 The Army crosses to the west side of the Hudson River.
Talman House Clarkstown, New York August 7 to 8, 1780 August 8 – Expenses paid to Mrs. Talman – $80.
DeWint House
"near Orangetown"
DeWint House Tappan.JPG 20 Livingston Avenue,
Tappan, New York
41°01′11″N 73°56′48″W / 41.019722°N 73.946667°W / 41.019722; -73.946667 (DeWint House)
August 8 to 24, 1780
Encampment near Liberty Pole Tavern
Tunis Cooper, proprietor
NE corner of Palisade Avenue & Tenafly Road,
Teaneck and Englewood, New Jersey
40°53′50″N 73°58′47″W / 40.89718°N 73.97969°W / 40.89718; -73.97969 (Liberty Pole Tavern)
August 24 to September 4, 1780 "Head Quarters near the Liberty Pole."[107]
Demolished circa 1880.
Andrew Harper House The Steuben House.jpg Old New Bridge Road,
Steenrapie (now River Edge), New Jersey
40°54′49″N 74°01′51″W / 40.913611°N 74.030833°W / 40.913611; -74.030833 (Steuben House)
September 4 to 17, 1780[108] The house was confiscated from Loyalist Jan Zabriskie.
Hopper House Peekskill, New York September 17 to 18, 1780
September 18 to 19, 1780 September 20 – In Washington's absence, the Army marches
from Steenrapie to Orangetown, New York.[109]
Jeremiah Wadsworth House Plaque dedicated to George Washington and Jeremiah Wadsworth.jpg 600 Main Street,
Hartford, Connecticut
41°45′48″N 72°40′26″W / 41.763333°N 72.673889°W / 41.763333; -72.673889 (Wadsworth Atheneum)
September 19 to 23, 1780 September 20-22 – Conference at Hartford.[110] Washington
meets with French General Rochambeau and French Admiral
De Ternay.
Demolished in 1887.
Wadsworth Atheneum now occupies the site.
Oliver Wolcott House OliverWolcottHouse 345.jpg South Street,
Litchfield, Connecticut
41°44′36″N 73°11′16″W / 41.743333°N 73.187778°W / 41.743333; -73.187778 (Oliver Wolcott House)
September 23 to 24, 1780
Peekskill, New York September 24 to 25, 1780
Returns to Beverley Robinson House Appletons' Arnold Benedict - Beverley Robinson house.jpg Garrison, New York (opposite West Point)
41°21′54″N 73°56′59″W / 41.36493333°N 73.94975°W / 41.36493333; -73.94975 (Beverley Robinson House)
September 25 to 28, 1780 September 25 – Washington arrives at the Robinson House
an hour after Benedict Arnold flees to the British warship
HMS Vulture.
Destroyed by fire in 1892.
Returns to DeWint House DeWint House Tappan.JPG 20 Livingston Avenue,
Tappan, New York
41°01′11″N 73°56′48″W / 41.019722°N 73.946667°W / 41.019722; -73.946667 (DeWint House)
September 28 to October 7, 1780[111] September 29 – British Major John André is tried and
sentenced to death for spying.
October 1 – Washington visits Preakness, New Jersey.
October 2 – Major André hanged on nearby Gallows Hill.
Paramus, New Jersey October 7 to 9, 1780[112]
Returns to Theunis Dey Mansion Dey Mansion 1.JPG 199 Totowa Road,
Wayne, New Jersey
40°54′56″N 74°14′00″W / 40.915556°N 74.233333°W / 40.915556; -74.233333 (Dey Mansion)
October 9 to 26, 1780
Crane House? October 26, 1780
near Passaic Falls[113] Preakness, New Jersey October 27 to 30, 1780
Returns to Theunis Dey Mansion Dey Mansion 1.JPG 199 Totowa Road,
Wayne, New Jersey
40°54′56″N 74°14′00″W / 40.915556°N 74.233333°W / 40.915556; -74.233333 (Dey Mansion)
October 30 to November 27, 1780
Passaic, New Jersey November 27 to 28, 1780
Morristown, New Jersey November 28 to
Returns to Colonel Thomas Ellison House River Road,
New Windsor, New York
41°28′23″N 74°00′55″W / 41.472976°N 74.015286°W / 41.472976; -74.015286 (Colonel Thomas Ellison House)
December 6, 1780[114] to May 18, 1781
Morgan's Tavern
Gideon Morgan, proprietor[115]
Litchfield, Connecticut May 18 to 19, 1781
Joseph Webb House Webb House, Wethersfield.JPG Wethersfield, Connecticut
41°42′43″N 72°39′11″W / 41.7120569°N 72.6531069°W / 41.7120569; -72.6531069 (Joseph Webb House)
May 19 to 24, 1781
Cogswell's Tavern
William Cogswell, proprietor
Christian Street,
New Preston, Connecticut
May 24 to 25, 1781 The tavern is now a private residence, owned by one of
Cogswell's descendants.[116]
Returns to Colonel Thomas Ellison House River Road,
New Windsor, New York
41°28′23″N 74°00′55″W / 41.472976°N 74.015286°W / 41.472976; -74.015286 (Colonel Thomas Ellison House)
May 25 to June 26, 1781
Returns to Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House 110 Oregon Road,
Cortlandt Manor, New York
41°18′44″N 73°54′22″W / 41.312222°N 73.906111°W / 41.312222; -73.906111 (Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House)
June 26 to July 2, 1781
Tarrytown, New York July 2, 1781
Returns to Valentine's Mile Square Valentine's Hill,
Yonkers, New York
40°55′52″N 73°51′52″W / 40.931141°N 73.864349°W / 40.931141; -73.864349 (St. Joseph's Seminary)
July 2 to 4, 1781 Now the site of St. Joseph's Seminary.
North Castle, New York July 5, 1781
"Appleby Place" (Joseph Appleby House)[117] Secor Road,
Philipsburg (now Hartsdale), New York
41°01′32″N 73°49′40″W / 41.025607°N 73.8278573°W / 41.025607; -73.8278573 (Appleby Place)
July 4 to 21, 1781 July 6 – Washington visits French troops at White Plains.
Demolished.
King's Bridge,
Bronx, New York City, New York
July 21 to 22, 1781
Returns to "Appleby Place" (Joseph Appleby House) Secor Road,
Philipsburg (now Hartsdale), New York
41°01′32″N 73°49′40″W / 41.025607°N 73.8278573°W / 41.025607; -73.8278573 (Appleby Place)
July 23 to August 19, 1781 Demolished.
King's Ferry (now Verplanck), New York August 19 to 20, 1781
Joshua Hett Smith House, also known as
"Treason House"
Joshua Hett Smith House from The Picturesque Hudson 1915.jpg Treason Hill,
West Haverstraw, New York
41°12′48″N 73°59′19″W / 41.213333°N 73.988475°W / 41.213333; -73.988475 (Joshua Hett Smith House)
August 20 to 25, 1781 On the march to Virginia, the combined Continental and
French Armies cross to the west side of the Hudson River at
King's Ferry.
Demolished circa 1921.[118]
Now the site of Helen Hayes Hospital.
John Phenix's tavern at the Larger Cross Roads in
Bedminster.
Ramapo (now Mahwah), New Jersey August 26, 1781
Jacob Morrel House 63 Main Street,
Chatham, New Jersey
40°44′21″N 74°22′28″W / 40.739127°N 74.374471°W / 40.739127; -74.374471 (Jacob Morrel House)
August 26 to 29, 1781 Now a restaurant.
Trenton, New Jersey August 29 to 30, 1781
Robert Morris House Front Street, south of Dock Creek,

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

August 30 to September 5, 1781
Wilmington, Delaware September 5 to 6, 1781
Wormsley, Maryland? September 6 to 7, 1781
Darlington, Maryland September 7 to 8, 1781
Fountain Inn Tavern
Daniel Grant, proprietor
SE corner of Baltimore & Hanover Streets,
Baltimore, Maryland
39°17′22″N 76°36′59″W / 39.2893723°N 76.6162927°W / 39.2893723; -76.6162927 (Fountain Inn Tavern)
September 8 to 9, 1781 September 8 – Expenses paid to Daniel Grant – £10.10.7.[119]
Demolished circa 1872.
September 9, 1781 Expenses "from Baltimore to my house" – £14.16.9.
Mount Vernon Mount Vernon Estate Mansion 2.JPG Fairfax County, Virginia
38°42′28″N 77°05′09″W / 38.707778°N 77.085833°W / 38.707778; -77.085833 (Mount Vernon)
September 9 to 12, 1781
Dumfries, Virginia September 12 to 13, 1781[120]
Bolling Green, Virginia? September 13 to 14, 1781
George Wythe House The George Wythe House (8017084861).jpg west side of Palace Green,
Williamsburg, Virginia
37°16′18″N 76°42′12″W / 37.271667°N 76.703333°W / 37.271667; -76.703333 (Wythe House)
September 14 to 17, 1781
Aboard the Queen Charlotte CapeHenry.jpg September 17 to 22, 1781[121] Washington sails down the James River to meet with French
Admiral de Barras aboard the Ville de Paris, off Cape Henry
Virginia.
"Expenses of a Trip to the French Fleet off Cape Henry"
– £25.
Returns to George Wythe House The George Wythe House (8017084861).jpg west side of Palace Green,
Williamsburg, Virginia
37°16′18″N 76°42′12″W / 37.271667°N 76.703333°W / 37.271667; -76.703333 (Wythe House)
September 22 to 28, 1781
Encampment Yorktown, Virginia
37°12′09″N 76°31′58″W / 37.202533°N 76.532816°W / 37.202533; -76.532816 (Washington's Headquarters, Yorktown)
September 28 to 29, 1781 September 28 – Siege of Yorktown begins.
Surrender of Lord Cornwallis.jpg October 19, 1781 British General Cornwallis surrenders at Yorktown
Burwell Bassett House, Eltham Plantation Eltham Road,
Eltham, Virginia
37°31′44″N 76°50′21″W / 37.528808°N 76.839138°W / 37.528808; -76.839138 (Eltham Plantation)
November 5 to 11, 1781 November 5 – Washington rushes to the bedside of his
stepson, John Parke Custis, who dies that day.
Destroyed by fire in 1876.
Returns to Mount Vernon Mount Vernon Estate Mansion 2.JPG Fairfax County, Virginia
38°42′28″N 77°05′09″W / 38.707778°N 77.085833°W / 38.707778; -77.085833 (Mount Vernon)
November 13 to 20, 1781
Annapolis, Maryland November 21 to 23, 1781
Governor John Penn House Third Street from Spruce Birch's Views Plate 18.jpg 242 South 3rd Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
39°56′45″N 75°08′49″W / 39.94585°N 75.14683°W / 39.94585; -75.14683 (Governor John Penn House)
November 26, 1781 to March 22, 1782 Confiscated from Loyalist Governor John Penn.
Following the October 1781 victory at Yorktown, George and
Martha Washington spend the winter in Philadelphia.
Demolished circa 1850.
Image: The Governor John Penn House is in the background,
right.
Trenton, New Jersey March 23 to 24, 1782
Returns to John Wallace House WallaceHouse.Somerville.NJ.jpg 71 Somerset Street,
Middlebrook (now Somerville), New Jersey
40°34′08″N 74°37′19″W / 40.568889°N 74.621944°W / 40.568889; -74.621944 (Wallace House (Somerville, New Jersey))
March 24 to 25, 1782
Returns to Jacob Ford Mansion Ford Mansion.gif 30 Washington Place,
Morristown, New Jersey
40°47′52″N 74°27′55″W / 40.797795°N 74.465203°W / 40.797795; -74.465203 (Ford Mansion)
March 25 to 28, 1782
Returns to Sloat House ("Mr. Lots House")[122] Sloat House, Sloatsburg, NY.jpg NY State Route 17 & Sterling Avenue,
Sloatsburg, New York
41°09′06″N 74°11′38″W / 41.151687°N 74.193889°W / 41.151687; -74.193889 (Sloat House)
March 29 to 30, 1782
Returns to Colonel William Colfax House Schuyler-Colfax House.jpg 2343 Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike,
Pompton (now Wayne), New Jersey
40°59′15″N 74°16′47″W / 40.9875°N 74.279722°W / 40.9875; -74.279722 (Schuyler-Colfax House)
March 30 to 31, 1782 Washington meets with Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt, and
visits "York Hutts" (New York militia encampment).[123]

.

Returns to Robert Erskine House Ringwood2.jpg Sloatsburg Road, Ringwood Manor State Park,
Ringwood, New Jersey
41°08′40″N 74°15′10″W / 41.144444°N 74.252778°W / 41.144444; -74.252778 (Ringwood Manor)
March 31, 1782[124] Demolished or destroyed by fire by 1810.
Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
March 31 to June 24, 1782
Poughkeepsie, New York June 24, 1782
Albany, New York June 26 to 28
Saratoga, New York June 29 to 30, 1782
Albany, New York June 30 to July 1, 1782
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
July 1 to 11 or 12, 1782
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania July 14 to 22 or 23, 1782 July 19 – Conference with French General Rochambeau.
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania July 24, 1782
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
July 28 to August 30 or 31, 1782 August 17 – Visit to West Point
George Washington by John Trumbull - B&W.jpg Verplanck, New York August 31 or September 1 to
October 27, 1782
George Washington at Verplanck's Point (1790) by
John Trumbull, New York City Hall, Manhattan.
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
October 27 to 28, 1782 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
October 28 to November 14 or 15, 1782
Marbletown, New York November 15
Kingston, New York November 16 to 17 or 18, 1782
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
November 18, 1782 to May 3, 1783
Dobbs Ferry, New York May 3 to 4, 1783
Returns to DeWint House DeWint House Tappan.JPG 20 Livingston Avenue,
Tappan, New York
41°01′11″N 73°56′48″W / 41.019722°N 73.946667°W / 41.019722; -73.946667 (DeWint House)
May 4 to 8, 1783 Peace negotiations with Sir Guy Carleton
Dobbs Ferry, New York May 8 to 9, 1783
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
May 9 to July 18, 1783 May 16 – Washington visits Poughkeepsie, New York.
General Philip Schuyler Mansion Schuyler Mansion Panorama Left.jpg 32 Catherine Street,
Albany, New York
42°38′23″N 73°45′38″W / 42.639722°N 73.760556°W / 42.639722; -73.760556 (Schuyler Mansion)
July 18 to 19, 1783 July 18 to August 5 – Tour of northern New York forts.[125]
"I have resolved to wear away a little Time, in performg a Tour
to the Northward, as far as Tyconderoga & Crown–point – and
perhaps as far up the Mohawk River as fort Schuyler—"[126]
General Schuyler House GeneralSchylerHouse.JPG Saratoga National Historical Park,
Schuylerville, New York
43°05′44″N 73°34′56″W / 43.095692°N 73.582203°W / 43.095692; -73.582203 (General Schuyler House)
Washington tours the Saratoga Battlefields with General
Philip Schuyler.
Fort William Henry Plan of Fort William Henry on Lake George.jpg South end of Lake George,
Lake George, New York
43°25′13″N 73°42′40″W / 43.420278°N 73.711111°W / 43.420278; -73.711111 (Fort William Henry)
"Mr Dimler ... precedes us to make arrangments [sic], and
particularly to have some light Boats provided & transported
to Lake George that we may not be delayed on our Arrival
there,"[127]
Fort Ticonderoga Fort Ticonderoga, Ticonderoga, NY.jpg South end of Lake Champlain,
Ticonderoga, New York
43°50′30″N 73°23′15″W / 43.841667°N 73.3875°W / 43.841667; -73.3875 (Fort Ticonderoga)
Fort Crown Point British Fort at Crown Point.jpg West side of Lake Champlain,
Crown Point, New York
44°01′45″N 73°25′52″W / 44.029167°N 73.431111°W / 44.029167; -73.431111 (Fort Crown Point)
July 21, 1783?
High Rock Spring? High Rock Spring, Saratoga (Boston Public Library).jpg High Rock Park, Maple Avenue,
Saratoga Springs, New York
43°05′11″N 73°46′48″W / 43.0863679°N 73.7801308°W / 43.0863679; -73.7801308 (High Rock Park)
July 26 – Washington dates at letter from Saratoga.[128]
Reputedly, Washington and General Schuyler camp at High
Rock Spring.[129]
Image: High Rock Spring in 1875.
Fort Schenectady[130] Schenectady Map 1750.jpeg South side of the Mohawk River,
Front & Ferry Streets,
Schenectady, New York
42°49′06″N 73°56′46″W / 42.818258°N 73.946°W / 42.818258; -73.946 (Fort Schenectady)
Fort Johnstown Ft.johnstown (Small).jpg North side of the Mohawk River,
Perry & Montgomery Streets,
Johnstown, New York
43°00′11″N 74°22′16″W / 43.003056°N 74.371111°W / 43.003056; -74.371111 (Fulton County Jail (Johnstown, New York))
Fort Rensselaer[131]
Peter Wormuth House?
Fort Plain (Village); Fort Plain Business Directory. ; NYPL1584224.tiff South side of the Mohawk River,
Wiles Park,
Fort Plain, New York
42°56′12″N 74°38′11″W / 42.936706°N 74.636383°W / 42.936706; -74.636383 (Fort Plain)
Demolished.
Image: Fort Rensselaer (marked "Old Fort Plains") is near the
top of the map.
Fort Herkimer FortHerkimer1776.gif South side of the Mohawk River,
German Flatts, New York
43°01′01″N 74°57′09″W / 43.016944°N 74.9525°W / 43.016944; -74.9525 (Fort Herkimer)
August 1, 1783[132] "I find it indispensably necessary to the public service that a
magazine of Provisions should be laid up immediately at the
Post of Fort Herkemer"[133]
Demolished in 1840.
Fort Dayton Frontier of NY in Revolution German Flatts Attack.jpg North side of the Mohawk River,
Herkimer, New York
43°01′45″N 74°59′24″W / 43.029167°N 74.99°W / 43.029167; -74.99 (Fort Dayton)
Old Fort Schuyler South side of the Mohawk River,
Main Street,
Utica, New York
43°06′15″N 75°13′28″W / 43.10425°N 75.22441667°W / 43.10425; -75.22441667 (Old Fort Schuyler)
Fort Schuyler (formerly Fort Stanwix) Fost FTST3697.jpg North side of the Mohawk River,
Park Street,
Rome, New York
43°12′38″N 75°27′19″W / 43.210556°N 75.45525°W / 43.210556; -75.45525 (Fort Stanwix)
Located at the portage between the Mohawk River and Wood
Creek.
Wood Creek OneidaCarryKitchen1772.png 43°12′12″N 75°41′35″W / 43.203333°N 75.693056°W / 43.203333; -75.693056 (Wood Creek)
Lake Otsego, source of the Susquehanna River Sunrise at New York.jpg Council Rock Park,
Cooperstown, New York
42°42′05″N 74°55′13″W / 42.701308°N 74.920416°W / 42.701308; -74.920416 (Council Rock Park)
Fort Alden CherryValleyMassacreMap.jpg Cherry Valley, New York
42°48′32″N 74°44′14″W / 42.808889°N 74.737222°W / 42.808889; -74.737222 (Cherry Valley massacre)
Located at the portage between Lake Otsego and the
Mohawk River.
Van Alstyne House? Van Alstyne House, Canajoharie (Montgomery County, New York).jpg Canajoharie, New York
42°54′12″N 74°34′22″W / 42.903333°N 74.572778°W / 42.903333; -74.572778 (Van Alstyne House)
Returns to Fort Rensselaer[134] Fort Plain (Village); Fort Plain Business Directory. ; NYPL1584224.tiff South side of the Mohawk River,
Wiles Park,
Fort Plain, New York
42°56′12″N 74°38′11″W / 42.936706°N 74.636383°W / 42.936706; -74.636383 (Fort Plain)
August 3 – Washington dates a letter from Fort
Rensselaer.[135]
Demolished.
Image: Fort Rensselaer (marked "Old Fort Plains") is near the
top of the map.
Returns to General Philip Schuyler Mansion Schuyler Mansion Panorama Left.jpg 32 Catherine Street,
Albany, New York
42°38′23″N 73°45′38″W / 42.639722°N 73.760556°W / 42.639722; -73.760556 (Schuyler Mansion)
August 4 to 5, 1783 August 5 – Washington and his staff leave Albany by boat,
and return to Newburgh.[136]
Returns to Jonathan Hasbrouck House,
Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site
Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh.jpg Washington Street,
Newburgh, New York
41°29′52″N 74°00′36″W / 41.497778°N 74.01°W / 41.497778; -74.01 (Washington's Headquarters State Historic Site)
August 5 to 19, 1783[137] "I have lately made a tour through the Lakes George &
Champlain as far as Crown point; then returning to
Schenectady, I proceeded up the Mohawk river to Fort
Schuyler (formerly Fort Stanwix), & crossed over to the Wood
Creek which empties into the Oneida Lake, & affords the
water communication with Ontario. I then traversed the
country to the head of the Eastern Branch of the
Susquehanna & viewed the Lake Otsego, & the portage
between that lake & the Mohawk river at Canajohario."[138]
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
August 19 to 20, 1783 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Thomas or Nathan Birdsall House southeast of Fredericksburg, New Jersey Expenses paid "at Birdsalls" – £5.2.6.
Demolished.
Major Johannes Joseph Blauvelt House Western Highway,
Blauvelt, New York
41°03′23″N 73°57′22″W / 41.05645°N 73.95598°W / 41.05645; -73.95598 (Johannes Joseph Blauvelt House)
Expenses paid "at Majr Blauvets for the use of his Hs [House]
Furniture &c." – £18.13.4.
"Rockingham" (John Berrien House) Rockingham House.JPG Kingston–Rocky Hill Road & Laurel Avenue,
Kingston, New Jersey
40°23′03″N 74°37′08″W / 40.384208°N 74.618958°W / 40.384208; -74.618958 (Rockingham, Kingston)
August 23 to November 10, 1783 Congress is in session in nearby Princeton. Washington
makes daily trips there to meet with them.
August 23 to 31 – "To Beakman's Tavern in Princeton for
Horses & Servants at Sundry times – £5.10.0."
The house was relocated in 1897, 1956, and 2001 because
of a quarry. It stands about a half mile from its original site.
Returns to DeWint House DeWint House Tappan.JPG 20 Livingston Avenue,
Tappan, New York
41°01′11″N 73°56′48″W / 41.019722°N 73.946667°W / 41.019722; -73.946667 (DeWint House)
November 11 to 14, 1783
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
November 14 to 15, 1783 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Poughkeepsie, New York November 15 to 16 or 17, 1783
Returns to Colonel Stephen Moore House WestPoint1780.jpg Target Hill, United States Military Academy,
West Point, New York
41°24′10″N 73°58′03″W / 41.402678°N 73.967565°W / 41.402678; -73.967565 (Stephen Moore House)
November 17 to 21, 1783 Demolished, possibly as early as 1812.
Now the site of Target Hill Athletic Fields.
Image: The Moore House is in the upper left corner of the fort.
Egbert Benson's Poughkeepsie, New York November 21 to 22, 1783
Blue Bell Tavern
Jacob Moore, proprietor
Broadway & 181st Street, Harlem,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
November 22 to 24, 1783 Demolished in 1876.
Leggett's Halfway Tavern west of 5th Avenue & 106th Street, Harlem,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
November 24 to 25, 1783 Now part of Central Park.
Washington's Entry into New York.tif November 25 – British evacuation from New York City.
Bull's Head Tavern Bulls Head Tavern New York City.jpg The Bowery, below Canal Street,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°42′58″N 73°59′48″W / 40.716106°N 73.996556°W / 40.716106; -73.996556 (Bull's Head Tavern)
November 25 to 26, 1783 Destroyed by fire in 1828.
Fraunces Tavern Frauncestavern.JPG Broad & Pearl Streets,
Manhattan, New York City, New York
40°42′12″N 74°00′41″W / 40.703333°N 74.011389°W / 40.703333; -74.011389 (Fraunces Tavern)
November 26 to December 4, 1783 December 4 – Washington's farewell dinner for his officers.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Benjamin Wadsworth House from Historic Buildings of Massachusetts.
  2. ^ Expenses paid on the Road ... April 1776. from the George Washington Papers.
  3. ^ Expenses paid on the Road ... April 1776. from the George Washington Papers.
  4. ^ Expenses paid on the Road ... April 1776. from the George Washington Papers.
  5. ^ Expense Account of Journey to and from Philadelphia from National Archives.
  6. ^ Varnum Lansing Collins, The Continental Congress at Princeton (University Library, 1908), p. 126.
  7. ^ William H. Benedict, "Early Taverns in New Brunswick," Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, vol. 3, no. 3 (July 1918), p. 137.
  8. ^ Queen's College (now Rutgers University) held classes at the tavern from 1771 to 1774. They were suspended when the only teacher, Frederick Frelinghuysen, joined the Continental Army. See Frederick Frelinghuysen from Founders Online.
  9. ^ Expense Account of Journey to and from Philadelphia from National Archives.
  10. ^ Petition of Samuel Fraunces to the U.S. Congress, March 5, 1785. — "That he [Fraunces] was the Person that first discovered the Conspiracy which was formed in the Year 1776 against the Life of his Excellency General Washington ..." "Memorials Addressed to Congress, 1775-88," Papers of the Continental Congress, Record Group 360, M.247, Reel 49, National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  11. ^ Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House from Westchester County Historical Society.
  12. ^ Washington to John Hancock, 16 November 1776 from the National Archives.
  13. ^ Peter Zabriskie House from Revolutionary War New Jersey.
  14. ^ William W. Scott, "Passaic's Victory Day" from Passaic County Historical Society.
  15. ^ Washington to Gen. William Heath, 29 November 1776 from the National Archives.
  16. ^ John Fenner House from Historic American Buildings Survey.
  17. ^ Washington to John Hancock, 5 January 1777 from the National Archives.
  18. ^ Pluckemin, Washington's Headquarters from Rutgers University.
  19. ^ General Orders, 29 May 1777 from the National Archives.
  20. ^ Gen. George Weedon to John Page, 31 May 1777 from the National Archives.
  21. ^ General Orders, 24 June 1777 from the National Archives.
  22. ^ Gen. Stirling to Washington, 3 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  23. ^ Washington to Gen. John Sullivan, 12 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  24. ^ Washington to Gen. John Sullivan, 12 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  25. ^ General Orders, 14 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  26. ^ Washington to John Hancock, 14 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  27. ^ Washington to Gen. Israel Putnam, 15 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  28. ^ John P. Galloway Jr., George Galloway: A Loyalist's Story (2012).[1]
  29. ^ General Orders, 21 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  30. ^ General Orders, 25 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  31. ^ Washington to Col. Theodorick Bland, 26 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  32. ^ General Orders, 26 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  33. ^ Washington to Gen. Israel Putnam, 28 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  34. ^ Washington to Christopher Ludwick, 25 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  35. ^ John Holcombe House
  36. ^ General Orders, 27 July 1777 from the National Archives.
  37. ^ Washington to Gen. Nathanael Greene, 1 August, 1777 from the National Archives.
  38. ^ General Orders, 5 August, 1777 from the National Archives.
  39. ^ Washington to John Hancock, 10 August, 1777 from the National Archives.
  40. ^ Washington to Col. Daniel Morgan, 10 August, 1777 from the National Archives.
  41. ^ Jacob Rudolph was listed as a tavernkeeper in Lower Darby Township in 1774. Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd series, vol. 12 (J. Severns & Company, 1897), p. 10. In 1777, he was a captain in the Pennsylvania Militia. During the retreat from Brandywine, he was captured by the British at Darby on September 12. Decennial Register of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution (F.B. Lippincott, 1898), p. 403.
  42. ^ General Orders, 24 August, 1777 from the National Archives.
  43. ^ Washington to Capt. Benjamin Pollard, 6 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  44. ^ Bill for Expenses of George Washington's Staff from the National Archives.
  45. ^ Bill for Expenses of George Washington's Staff from the National Archives.
  46. ^ General Orders, 6 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  47. ^ Bill for Expenses of George Washington's Staff from the National Archives.
  48. ^ General Orders, 13 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  49. ^ Buck Tavern from Lower Merion Historical Society.
  50. ^ "Upgrades coming to historic Parker Ford Tavern," The Pottstown Mercury News, January 26, 2009.[2]
  51. ^ General Orders, 19 September, 1777 from the National Archives.
  52. ^ Washington to Gen. Philemon Dickinson, 22 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  53. ^ General Orders, 22 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  54. ^ Washington to Gen. Israel Putnam, 23 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  55. ^ General Orders, 23 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  56. ^ Washington to Samuel Kennedy, 26 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  57. ^ Washington to Dr. Samuel Kennedy, 26 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  58. ^ General Orders, 30 September 1777 from the National Archives.
  59. ^ General Orders, 2 October 1777 from the National Archives.
  60. ^ Washington to John Gill, 6 October 1777 from the National Archives.
  61. ^ General Orders, 5 October 1777 from the National Archives.
  62. ^ General Orders, 15 October, 1777 from the National Archives.
  63. ^ General Orders, 16 October 1777 from the National Archives.
  64. ^ General Orders, 11 December 1777 from the National Archives.
  65. ^ Revolutionary War Journals of Henry Dearborn, 1775–1783, Lloyd A. Brown & Howard H. Peckham, eds. (New York: 1939, reprinted 1971), p. 118.
  66. ^ General Orders, 19 June 1778 from the National Archives.
  67. ^ Judith A. Meier, An Historic District within the Boundaries of the Norristown State Hospital (East Norriton Township, 2000).
  68. ^ General Orders, 20 June 1778 from the National Archives.
  69. ^ There is a dispute over whether the Hopewell headquarters was at the house of John Hunt or John Hart.
  70. ^ Washington to Gen. Charles Lee, 22 June 1778 from the National Archives.
  71. ^ Gen. Lafayette to Washington, 25 June 1778 from the National Archives.
  72. ^ "July 1st. We Left Rockey hill and Marched and come to Brumsick where Head Quarters was pitched our tents." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  73. ^ McHenry, p. 22.
  74. ^ "It was about 6 o'clock in the (15 July) morning when we bade adieu to the Hermitage —" McHenry, p. 23.
  75. ^ Alexander Hamilton to Capt. Patrick Dennis, 16 July 1778 from the National Archives.
  76. ^ Washington to Gen. Horatio Gates, 19 July 1778 from the National Archives.
  77. ^ Gen. Charles Scott to Washington, 20 September 1778 from the National Archives.
  78. ^ "The 20th. [A]fter twelve miles March we Come to Mr. Right's mills on the age [edge] of the White Planes." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  79. ^ "The 27th. Head Quarters moved Down to the White Planes" Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  80. ^ This may be the house of Lieutenant Ephraim Raymond of the New York Militia, who was from Bedford.
  81. ^ "Sept. 16. We Left the White planes and Marching through North Castel and after sixteen miles March we Come to Mr. Rayemand in Bedford." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  82. ^ "The 18th. We Left Bedford and Marched and Come to Fredrexburg, after the March of fifteen miles and Pitched our tents." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  83. ^ The Ferris property appears on a 1778 map, prepared for Washington's use by Robert Erskine, geographer with the Continental Army. A detail of the map was published in Rev. Warren H. Wilson, Quaker Hill in the Nineteenth Century (Quaker Hill Conference Association, 1907), frontispiece. [3]
  84. ^ "The 19th. We Left Fredericksburg and after thirteen miles march we pitched our tents at Mr. Reed [Ferris]'s field in Oblong." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  85. ^ The 26th. Head Quarters and likewise the guard Left Oblong and come to Mr. Cain's, in Fredrexburg four miles and pitched tents." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  86. ^ Washington to Gen. Johann DeKalb, 22 September 1778 from the National Archives.
  87. ^ "The 30th. His Exelency with his adde-camps went to Fishkill." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  88. ^ Washington to Gen. Charles Scott, 8 October 1778 from the National Archives.
  89. ^ '"The 8th. His Exelency and Addecamp returned from Fishkill to Mr. Cane's." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  90. ^ "Nov. 28th. His Exelency and also his Gard Left Fredericksburg and Marched for the Jarseys [New Jersey]" Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  91. ^ Washington to Maj. John Bigelow, 29 November 1777 from the National Archives.
  92. ^ "Nov. 28th. [A]t Night we Pitched our tents by Clane's tavern in Philipsepatten [Philipsburg] after the March of sixteen miles." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  93. ^ "Dec. 1st. The guard Left Fishkill and Crossed at King's farrey Marched on to Col. Hazes and Encampt after Marching two and three is five miles." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  94. ^ "The 2d. We left Col. Hazes and after seventeen miles March we Come to Mr. Jones Baggat in Romepawe [Ramapo] and Picht our tents." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  95. ^ "The 3d. We left Romepawe and after twenty miles March we Come to Mr. Goods in Prequannackit [Pequannock]." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  96. ^ "The 4th. We Left Mr. Goods and after twenty miles March we Come to Mr. Lott's in Troy and Pitcht our tents." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  97. ^ "The 5th. We left Troy and Marched and Come to Morristown." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  98. ^ "The 6th. We left Morristown and after twenty-three miles March we Come to Mr. Wallase, where His Exelency had his winter Quarters" Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  99. ^ "His Excellency's stay was rendered the more agreeable by the company of his lady, and the domestic retirement which he enjoyed at the house of the Honorable Henry Laurens, Esquire, with whom he resided." —Pennsylvania Packet, February 4, 1779.
  100. ^ General Orders, 6 February 1779 from the National Archives.
  101. ^ Alexander Hamilton to Gen. Arthur St. Clair, 5 June 1779 from the National Archives.
  102. ^ Alexander Hamilton to Gen. Arthur St. Clair, 5 June 1779 from the National Archives.
  103. ^ "The 21st. We Left Smith's Clove and after fourteen miles march we Come to Mr. Ellis in New Winsor where the Gen. had his Quarters" Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  104. ^ "The 20th. After putting all the baggage aboard the sloop we left New Winsor at four in the Afternoon and went by water to West Point and staid aboard that Night twelve miles." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  105. ^ Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  106. ^ Henry Doremus House from Revolutionary War New Jersey.
  107. ^ Washington to Henry Lee, 24 August 1780 from the National Archives.
  108. ^ "The 17th. Gen. Washington and Gen. Nocks [Knox] and Gen. DeMarkee [Lafayette] with there Addes set out from Head Quarters for Hartford to meet the French troops that was a coming to jine our army." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  109. ^ "The 20th. The whole army had orders to March, the gard was beat, the tents loded into wagons and at ten in the morning the army left Strumpee and after Eleven miles march we come to Oringetown or Tappan and Encampt." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  110. ^ Conference at Hartford, 22 September 1780 from the National Archives.
  111. ^ "The 7th. The army left Oringtown the genl. [general ] was beat at seven of the Clock in the morning and we Marched at Nine and after twelve miles march we Come to Puramas at half past ten in the Evening" Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  112. ^ The 9th. We left Puramas and Come to Quackit [Kakiat] and Encampt." Elijah Fisher's Journal.
  113. ^ Washington to Jonathan Trumbull, 28 October, 1780 from the National Archives.
  114. ^ Washington to Board of War, 7 December 1780 from the National Archives.
  115. ^ Gideon Morgan
  116. ^ "Cogswell Tavern, New Preston, Connecticut." Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, vol. 23, no. 5 (November 1903), pp. 360-62.[4]
  117. ^ Joseph Appleby House from the National Archives.
  118. ^ Joshua Hett Smith House, Treason Hill from Hudson River Valley Heritage.
  119. ^ Washington's Diary, 8 September 1781 from the National Archives.
  120. ^ Washington to Thomas McKean, 12 September 1781 from the National Archives.
  121. ^ Washington Diary, 17 September 1781 from the National Archives.
  122. ^ Washington to Gen. Charles Lee, 30 March 1782 from the National Archives.
  123. ^ Washington to Gen. Charles Lee, 30 March 1782 from the National Archives.
  124. ^ Benjamin Walker to Gen. William Heath, 31 March 1782 from the National Archives.
  125. ^ "I have always entertained a great desire to see the Northern part of this State before I returned to the Southward ... I have therefore concerted with Governor Clinton to make a Tour to reconnoitre those places where the most remarkable Posts were established, and the ground which became famous by being the theatre of Action in 1777—" Washington to Philip J. Schuyler 15 July 1783] from the National Archives.
  126. ^ Washington to Elias Boudinot, 16 July 1783 from the National Archives.
  127. ^ Washington to Philip J. Schuyler, 15 July 1783 from the National Archives.
  128. ^ "I wrote to you from Saratoga on the 26th Ulto" Washington to Timothy Pickering, 6 August 1783 from the National Archives.
  129. ^ Olde Bryan Inn - History
  130. ^ Fort Schenectady from New York State Military Museum.
  131. ^ Fort Plain from New York State Military Museum.
  132. ^ Leslie W. Devereux, March 1, 1932 presentation. Quoted by A.J. Berry, "Washington's Mohawk Valley Tour," Three Rivers: Hudson-Mohawk-Schoharie.[5]
  133. ^ Washington to William Duer, 26 July 1783 from the National Archives.
  134. ^ Fort Plain from New York State Military Museum.
  135. ^ Washington to Baron Von Steuben, 3 August 1783 from the National Archives.
  136. ^ Washington to Elias Boudinot, 8 August 1783 from the National Archives.
  137. ^ "I returned to this place yesterday afternoon from a tour of Nineteen days through the Northern & Westwern parts of this State." Washington to William Stephens Smith, 6 August, 1783 from the National Archives.
  138. ^ Washington to the Marquis de Chastellux, 12 October 1783 from the National Archives.

Sources[edit]

  • The Papers of George Washington, Washington's Revolutionary War Itinerary and the Location of His Headquarters, 1775-1783, University of Virginia.[6]
  • William Spohn Baker, Itinerary of General Washington from June 15, 1775, to December 23, 1783, (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1892).[7]
  • Elijah Fisher's Journal while in the War for Independence, William B. Lapham, ed. (Augusta, Maine: Press of Badger and Manley, 1880).[8] Fisher joined Washington's life-guards March 30, 1778, while at Valley Forge.
  • Bernard Christian Steiner, The Life and Correspondence of James McHenry: Secretary of War under Washington and Adams (Burrow Brothers Company, 1907).

External links[edit]