List of Wichita State Shockers head football coaches

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Wichita State Shockers football program was a college football team that represented Wichita State University until the school discontinued football. The team had 32 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1897. The last head coach for the team was Ron Chismar who first took the position for the 1984 season.[1]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

# Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs Awards/Notes
01 T. H. Morrison 1897 1 1 0 0 1.000
No Coach 1898 1 0 1 0 .000
02 Harry Hess 1899–1901 22 10 10 2 .500
03 Guy Peverly 1902 8 4 3 1 .563
No Coach 1903 6 2 0 .750
04 A. F. Holste 1904 9 4 5 0 .444
05 Willis S. "Billy" Bates 1905–1908 39 28 8 3 .756
06 Roy K. Thomas 1909–1911 25 15 8 2 .640
07 E. V. Long 1912–1913 17 6 11 0 .353
08 H. C. Buck 1914–1915 16 6 8 2 .438
09 Coach Banbury 1918 5 1 4 0 .200
10 H. K. Cassidy 1919 8 1 5 2 .250
11 Wilmer D. Elfrink 1920 9 3 4 2 .444
12 Lamar Hoover 1916–1922 36 18 14 4 .556
13 Leonard J. Umnus 1925–1927 23 12 7 4 .609
14 Sam H. Hill 1923–1929 33 14 14 5 .500
15 Albert J. "Al" Gebert 1930–1941 114 68 40 6 .623
16 Melvin J. "Mel" Binford 1944–1945 18 11 6 1 .639
17 Ralph M. Graham 1942–1947 30 17 13 0 .567
18 James W. "Jim" Trimble 1948–1950 30 13 14 3 .483
19 Robert S. "Bob" Carlson 1951–1952 19 5 13 1 .289
20 Jack Mitchell 1953–1954 19 13 5 1 .711
21 Pete Tillman 1955–1956 20 11 8 1 .575
22 Chalmer E. "Woody" Woodard 1957–1959 30 10 18 2 .367
23 Henry "Hank" Foldberg 1960–1961 21 16 5 0 .762
24 Marcelino "Chelo" Huerta 1962–1964 29 14 15 0 .483
25 George Karras 1965–1966 19 4 15 0 .211
26 Boyd Converse 1967 10 2 7 1 .250
27 Eddie Kriwiel 1968 10 0 10 0 .000
28 Ben Wilson 1969–1970 19 2 17 0 .105 Was killed in the Wichita State University football team plane crash on October 2, 1970
29 Bob Seaman 1971–1973 33 13 20 0 .394
30 Jim Wright 1974–1978 55 17 37 1 .318
31 Willie E. Jeffries 1979–1983 55 21 32 2 .400 First African American head coach of a NCAA Division I-A football program
Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.[5]
32 Ron Chismar 1984–1986 33 8 25 0 .242

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[2]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[3]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ DeLassus, David. "Wichita State Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved November 12, 2010. 
  2. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  4. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  5. ^ ESPN.com "College Football" May 11, 2010