List of World War II firearms of Germany

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Note: Weapons listed were either made by Germany or for Germany but do not include weapons made from captured equipment or captured weapons later utilized by German forces.

Pistols[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Astra 300 Astra 300 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.65×17mm SR
9×17mm Kurz
Luftwaffe 85,390 delivered from 1941 to 1944.[1] [2]
Astra 400 Astra 400 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 9×23mm Largo - 6,000 purchased in 1941.[1] [3]
Astra 600 Astra 600 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 9×19mm Parabellum - 10,450 Astra 600s had been delivered to Germany until German occupation of France ceased.[4] The remainder of the German order, consisting of 28,000 pistols, was intercepted by Allied forces in September 1944.[1] [3]
Astra 900 Astra 900 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.63×25mm Mauser Wehrmacht 1,050 delivered in March 1943. [1]
Browning Hi-Power Browning Hi-Power Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
319,000 manufactured under German occupation. Designated Pistole 640(b) in German service. [5]
Dreyse Model 1907 Dreyse M1907 Rheinmetall 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Volksturm
- [6]
Dreyse Model 1907 FÉG 37M Fémárú, Fegyver- és Gépgyár 7.65×17mm SR Luftwaffe Examples produced for German use included a manual safety, which was absent from the Hungarian-issue version. Designated Pistole 37(u) in German service. [7]
FN Model 1910 IMG 3065.jpg
FN Model 1910 Fabrique Nationale de Herstal 7.65×17mm Browning Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
The FN M1910 was produced under the German occupation. Designated "Pistole 621" in German service. -
FN1922.jpg FN Model 1922 Fabrique Nationale de Herstal 7.65×17mm Browning
9×17mm Browning
Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
The FN M1922 was mainly produced for the Luftwaffe, but oddly enough was still sold commercially up until 1942. -
Kongsberg Colt.jpg Kongsberg Colt Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk 11.43x23mm ACP Wehrmacht 8200 where produced under German occupation. Designated "Pistole 657" in German service. -
Luger P08 Luger P08 pistol Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken
Mauser-Werke
9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
The Luger P08's production was taken over by Mauser after World War I.[8] [9]
Mauser HSc Mauser HSc Mauser-Werke 7.65×17mm SR Kriegsmarine
Heer
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Originally produced as a commercial pistol, The Mauser HSc was fully adopted by the German Navy and Air force.[10] [11]
Mauser HSc Mauser C96 Mauser-Werke 7.63×25mm Mauser
9×19mm Parabellum
Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
- [11]
wz.35 Vis Radom wz.35 Vis Łucznik Arms Factory, Radom 9×19mm Parabellum Fallschirmjäger
Feldgendarmerie
Designated Pistole 645(p) in German service. [12]
Steyr M1912 Steyr M1912 Steyr Mannlicher 9×19mm Parabellum
9×23mm Steyr
Wehrmacht When the Austrian Army was absorbed, existing Steyr M1912 pisols were rechambered to fire 9mm Parabellum rounds.[10] Designated Pistole 12(ö) in German service. [13]
Sauer 38H Sauer 38H Sauer & Sohn 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
The manual safety on the Sauer 38H was excluded on pistols produced between 1944 and 1945.[10] [14]
Star Model B Star Model B Star Bonifacio Echeverria 9×19mm Parabellum Luftwaffe 25,000 delivered prior to liberation of France. [1]
- Volkspistole Mauser-Werke
Carl Walther GmbH
9×19mm Parabellum Volksturm An emergency weapon production can be traced to Mauser and Walther but full identification is still uncertain.[15] [16]
Walther P38 Walther P38 Carl Walther GmbH
Mauser-Werke
Spreewerke GmbH
9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
480,000 Walther P38s were made by 1945 for the German military.[17] [18]
Walther PP Walther PP Carl Walther GmbH 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Panzergrenadier
Waffen-SS
- [18]
Walther PPK Walther PPK Carl Walther GmbH 7.65×17mm SR
9×17mm Kurz
Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
- [18]

Rifles[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 Rheinmetall-Borsig
Heinrich Krieghoff Waffenfabrik
L. O. Dietrich
7.92×57mm Mauser Fallschirmjäger Approximately 2,000 produced of first variation, 5,000 of second and third variations.
Gewehr 24(t) Gewehr 24(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Modification of Czechoslovak vz. 24 rifle to more closely conform with standard-issue Karabiner 98k. 330,050 produced in occupied Czechoslovakia from 1938 to 1943.
- Gewehr 33/40(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Adaptation of Czechoslovak vz. 33. 131,503 produced from 1940 to 1942 for German use.
Gewehr 41(M) Gewehr 41(M) Mauser-Werke 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Mauser self-loading rifle design tested in 1941, not accepted for service.
Gewehr 41(W) Gewehr 41(W) Carl Walther GmbH 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Walther self-loading rifle adopted as standard in 1942 but superseded by improved Gewehr 43.
Gewehr 43/Karabiner 43 Gewehr 43/Karabiner 43 Carl Walther GmbH 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Modification of Gewehr 41(W) to gas operation, later renamed Karabiner 43.
Infanteriegewehr m-1888 - Tyskland - kaliber 7,92mm - Armémuseum.jpg Gewehr 88 Steyr-Mannlicher
various others
M/88
7.92×57mm Mauser
Volksturm The Gewehr 88 was the first rifle adopted by Germany that used Smokeless powder.
Gewehr 98 Gewehr 98 Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
SS
Volkssturm
Standard German infantry rifle of World War I. Saw limited use in World War II, including issue to Adolf Hitler's SS bodyguard unit.
- Gewehr 98/40 Fémárú, Fegyver- és Gépgyár 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Adaptation of Hungarian 35M rifle to fire 7.92×57mm Mauser ammunition and to mount German bayonets. 138,400 produced from 1941 to 1944. [19]
Karabiner 98a Karabiner 98a Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Karabiner 98b Karabiner 98b Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Karabiner 98k Karabiner 98k Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Kriegsmarine
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Adopted as standard German infantry rifle in 1935. Over 14 million produced from 1934 until German surrender.
Maschinenkarabiner 42(H) Maschinenkarabiner 42(H) C. G. Haenel 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht Accepted after troop trials in 1943, about 8,000 produced. Served as prototype to MP 43.
- M30 Luftwaffe drilling Sauer & Sohn 9.3x74mmR, 12 Gauge[20] Luftwaffe Issued as survival weapon for Luftwaffe aircrews. [21]
Sturmgewehr 44 Sturmgewehr 44 C. G. Haenel 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Evolved from MKb 42(H). First series completed in July 43, first combat use in Eastern Front. Initially named Maschinenpistole 43 and then Maschinenpistole 44.
Sturmgewehr 45 reproduction.png Sturmgewehr 45(M) Mauser-Werke 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht Experimental lightweight selective-fire weapon, with roller-locked retarded blowback system, only prototypes built prior to end of war. Forefunner of the Spanish CETME 58.
Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 - 7.92×33mm Kurz Volkssturm Intended as a cheap and mass-produced self-loading weapon. First series completed in late 1944.

Machine guns[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Maschinengewehr 08 Maschinengewehr 08 DWM
Spandau
Erfurt
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Standard machine gun of World War I. Saw limited use in World War II.
Munster MG15 (dark1).jpg MG 15 Rheinmetall 7.92×57mm Mauser Luftwaffe
Wehrmacht
The MG 15 was at the beginning of the war mainly used on aircraft of the Luftwaffe. After being replaced by other machine guns many MG 15s were modified for use by ground forces.
Maschinengewehr 30 Maschinengewehr 30 Steyr-Daimler-Puch 7.92×57mm Mauser Luftwaffe
Wehrmacht
Rejected by the Reichswehr but accepted by the Luftwaffe for aircraft use. Later transferred to Wehrmacht ground units.
Maschinengewehr 30(t) Maschinengewehr 30(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Waffen-SS Czechoslovak ZB vz. 30 produced under German occupation for Waffen-SS use.
Maschinengewehr 34 Maschinengewehr 34 Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Kriegsmarine
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Adapted from MG30 and adopted as standard machine gun in 1934. Issued to German troops starting in 1935.
Maschinengewehr 42 Maschinengewehr 42 Mauser-Werke
Steyr-Daimler-Puch
Gustloff Werke
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Successor to MG34, adopted in 1942. Over 400,000 produced prior to German surrender.
n/a MG 45 n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Emergency alternative to the MG42.
n/a Barnitzke machine gun n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Proposed MG42 replacement using an unusual delayed blowback operation.
n/a MG 81 n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Machine gun used by the Luftwaffe.

Submachine guns[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Astra 903 Astra 903 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.63×25mm Mauser Wehrmacht Select-fire version of the Astra 900, itself a clone of the Mauser C96. Approximately 2,000 delivered in 1943. [1]
Beretta Model 38/42 Beretta Model 38/42 Beretta 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Designated Maschinenpistole 738(i) in German service.
Beretta Model 38/44 Beretta Model 38/44 Beretta 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Designated Maschinenpistole 739(i) in German service.
- Erma EMP Československá Zbrojovka Brno 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Not officially adopted, but used in small numbers by the Waffen-SS. [22]
M712 Schnellfeuer Mauser M712 Schnellfeuer Mauser-Werke 7.63×25mm Mauser Wehrmacht Select-fire, removable-magazine version of the Mauser C96 pistol.
Maschinenpistole 18 Maschinenpistole 18 Bergmann Waffenfabrik 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Maschinenpistole 28 Maschinenpistole 28 Bergmann Waffenfabrik 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht Improved version of MP18.
Maschinenpistole 34 Maschinenpistole 34 Waffenfabrik Steyr 9×19mm Parabellum
9×23mm Steyr
Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Feldgendarmerie
Designed by Rheinmetall but produced in Austria by Steyr to evade Treaty of Versailles restrictions. After the Anschluss, produced from 1938 to 1940 for the Waffen-SS. Pre-Anschluss Austrian examples designated Maschinenpistole 34(ö) in German service.
Maschinenpistole 35 Maschinenpistole 35 Bergmann 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Produced from 1935 to 1944. Used primarily by the Waffen-SS.
Maschinenpistole 38 Maschinenpistole 38 Erma Werke 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Maschinenpistole 40 Maschinenpistole 40 Erma Werke 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Improved version of MP38, utilizing stamped metal parts for easier mass production.
Maschinenpistole 41 Maschinenpistole 41 Haenel 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Combined the receiver, operating mechanism, and magazine housing of the MP40 and the stock, trigger and fire selector of the MP28.
Maschinenpistole 3008 - 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Volkssturm
Based on British Sten Mk II, designed as an easy to manufacture last-ditch weapon. Approximately 10,000 produced in 1945.
Suomi KP/-31 Suomi KP/-31 Tikkakoski Oy 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht 3,042 purchased from Finland.
- ZK-383 Československá Zbrojovka Brno 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Produced in occupied Czechoslovakia for Waffen-SS use. [23]

Anti-tank weapons[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Granatbüchse 39 Granatbüchse 39 Gustloff Werke - Wehrmacht Conversion of Panzerbüchse 39 to launch rifle grenades.
- Panzerbüchse 38 Gustloff Werke 7.92×94mm Wehrmacht
Panzerbüchse 39 Panzerbüchse 39 Gustloff Werke 7.92×94mm Wehrmacht Improved version of Panzerbüchse 38.
Panzerfaust Panzerfaust - 100mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Volksturm
Disposable single-shot rocket launcher.
Raketenpanzerbüchse 43 Raketenpanzerbüchse 43 - 88mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Popularly referred to as Panzerschreck. Enlarged version of American M1A1 Bazooka.
Raketenpanzerbüchse 54 Raketenpanzerbüchse 54 - 88mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Improved version of the Raketenpanzerbüchse 43, adding a blast shield.
Solothurn S-18/1000 Solothurn S-18/1000 Solothurn 20×138mmB Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
- Solothurn S-18/1100 Solothurn 20×138mmB Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Full-automatic version of the Solothurn S-18/1000.
Sturmpistole Sturmpistole - - Wehrmacht Modification of standard flare guns to launch grenades.

Other Weapons[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Primary User Note References
Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1808-15A, Nordfrankreich, Soldat mit Flammenwerfer.jpg Flammenwerfer 35 Various Wehrmacht Later succeed by improved Flammenwerfer 41 -
- Einstossflammenwerfer 46 Various Fallschirmjäger Cheap produced variant produced for the Volkssturm or the Werwolf movements. -

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

General
  • Fowler, Anthony North; Stronge, Charles (2007), Pistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns, JG Press, ISBN 1-57215-595-7 
  • Hogg, Ian; Weeks, John (2000). Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition. Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-824-7. 
  • Hogg, Ian; Walter, John (2004). Pitols of the World 4th Edition. Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87349-460-1. 
  • Kinard, Jeff (2003). Pistols: an illustrated history of their impact. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1-85109-470-9. 
  • McNab, Chris (2004). The Great Book of Guns. Thunder Bay Press. ISBN 1-59223-304-X. 
Inline
  1. ^ a b c d e f Walter, John, Guns of the Third Reich (2004) pp. 110-111
  2. ^ Hogg, Ian Pistols of the World (2004) pp.111
  3. ^ a b Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.136
  4. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 355
  5. ^ Walter, John, Guns of the Third Reich (2004) p. 105
  6. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 265
  7. ^ Kokalis, Peter. Hungarian Small Arms in Germany's Service. Shotgun News, 2005, Vol 59 Issue 36 p. 12-13.
  8. ^ McNab, Chris, The Great Book of Guns (2004) p. 130
  9. ^ Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 41
  10. ^ a b c Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 46
  11. ^ a b Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.160
  12. ^ Bishop, Chris (2006). The Encyclopedia of Small Arms and Artillery. Grange Books. pp. 13–14. ISBN 978-1-84013-910-5. 
  13. ^ Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.179
  14. ^ McNab, Chris, The Great Book of Guns (2004) p. 159
  15. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 148
  16. ^ Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 47
  17. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 365
  18. ^ a b c Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.162
  19. ^ "Mannlicher Gew.98/40 German Infantry Rifle". Manowar's Hungarian Weapons. Retrieved June 10, 2012. 
  20. ^ Fjestad, S.P. (2009). Blue Book of Gun Values 2009. Blue Book Publications. p. 1318. ISBN 1-886768-87-0. 
  21. ^ Kokalis, Peter (May 10, 2009). "Luftwaffe Drilling". Shotgun News. pp. 26–30. 
  22. ^ "Modern Firearms - EMP.35 Erma". world.guns.ru. Retrieved 2012-06-11. 
  23. ^ "Modern Firearms - Zk-383". world.guns.ru. Retrieved 2012-06-11.