List of World War II firearms of Germany

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Note: Weapons listed were either made by Germany or for Germany but do not include weapons made from captured equipment or captured weapons later utilized by German forces.

Pistols[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Astra 300 Astra 300 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.65×17mm SR
9×17mm Kurz
Luftwaffe 85,390 delivered from 1941 to 1944.[1] [2]
Astra 400 Astra 400 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 9×23mm Largo - 6,000 purchased in 1941.[1] [3]
Astra 600 Astra 600 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 9×19mm Parabellum - 10,450 Astra 600s had been delivered to Germany until German occupation of France ceased.[4] The remainder of the German order, consisting of 28,000 pistols, was intercepted by Allied forces in September 1944.[1] [3]
Astra 900 Astra 900 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.63×25mm Mauser - 1,050 delivered in March 1943. [1]
Browning Hi-Power Browning Hi-Power Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
319,000 manufactured under German occupation. Designated Pistole 640(b) in German service. [5]
Dreyse Model 1907 Dreyse M1907 Rheinmetall 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Volksturm
- [6]
Dreyse Model 1907 FÉG 37M Fémárú, Fegyver- és Gépgyár 7.65×17mm SR Luftwaffe Examples produced for German use included a manual safety, which was absent from the Hungarian-issue version. Designated Pistole 37(u) in German service. [7]
FN Model 1910 IMG 3065.jpg
FN Model 1910 Fabrique Nationale de Herstal 7.65×17mm Browning Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
The FN M1910 was produced under the German occupation. Designated "Pistole 621" in German service. -
Kongsberg Colt.jpg Kongsberg Colt Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk 11.43x23mm ACP Wehrmacht 8200 where produced under German occupation. Designated "Pistole 657" in German service. -
Luger P08 Luger P08 pistol Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken
Mauser-Werke
9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
The Luger P08's production was taken over by Mauser after World War I.[8] [9]
Mauser HSc Mauser HSc Mauser-Werke 7.65×17mm SR Kriegsmarine
Heer
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Originally produced as a commercial pistol, The Mauser HSc was fully adopted by the German Navy and Air force.[10] [11]
Mauser HSc Mauser C96 Mauser-Werke 7.63×25mm Mauser
9×19mm Parabellum
Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
- [11]
wz.35 Vis Radom wz.35 Vis Łucznik Arms Factory, Radom 9×19mm Parabellum Fallschirmjäger
Feldgendarmerie
Designated Pistole 645(p) in German service. [12]
Steyr M1912 Steyr M1912 Steyr Mannlicher 9×19mm Parabellum
9×23mm Steyr
Wehrmacht When the Austrian Army was absorbed, existing Steyr M1912 pisols were rechambered to fire 9mm Parabellum rounds.[10] Designated Pistole 12(ö) in German service. [13]
Sauer 38H Sauer 38H Sauer & Sohn 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
The manual safety on the Sauer 38H was excluded on pistols produced between 1944 and 1945.[10] [14]
Star Model B Star Model B Star Bonifacio Echeverria 9×19mm Parabellum Luftwaffe 25,000 delivered prior to liberation of France. [1]
- Volkspistole Mauser-Werke
Carl Walther GmbH
9×19mm Parabellum Volksturm An emergency weapon production can be traced to Mauser and Walther but full identification is still uncertain.[15] [16]
Walther P38 Walther P38 Carl Walther GmbH
Mauser-Werke
Spreewerke GmbH
9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
480,000 Walther P38s were made by 1945 for the German military.[17] [18]
Walther PP Walther PP Carl Walther GmbH 7.65×17mm SR Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Panzergrenadier
Waffen-SS
- [18]
Walther PPK Walther PPK Carl Walther GmbH 7.65×17mm SR
9×17mm Kurz
Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
- [18]

Rifles[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 Rheinmetall-Borsig
Heinrich Krieghoff Waffenfabrik
L. O. Dietrich
7.92×57mm Mauser Fallschirmjäger Approximately 2,000 produced of first variation, 5,000 of second and third variations.
Gewehr 24(t) Gewehr 24(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Modification of Czechoslovak vz. 24 rifle to more closely conform with standard-issue Karabiner 98k. 330,050 produced in occupied Czechoslovakia from 1938 to 1943.
- Gewehr 33/40(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Adaptation of Czechoslovak vz. 33. 131,503 produced from 1940 to 1942 for German use.
Gewehr 41(M) Gewehr 41(M) Mauser-Werke 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Mauser self-loading rifle design tested in 1941, not accepted for service.
Gewehr 41(W) Gewehr 41(W) Carl Walther GmbH 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Walther self-loading rifle adopted as standard in 1942 but superseded by improved Gewehr 43.
Gewehr 43/Karabiner 43 Gewehr 43/Karabiner 43 Carl Walther GmbH 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Modification of Gewher 41(W) to gas operation, later renamed Karabiner 43.
Infanteriegewehr m-1888 - Tyskland - kaliber 7,92mm - Armémuseum.jpg Gewehr 88 Ludwig Loewe Steyr-Mannlicher various others M/88, 7.92×57mm Mauser Volksturm The Gewehr 88 was the first rifle adopted by Germany that used Smokeless powder.
Gewehr 98 Gewehr 98 Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
SS
Volkssturm
Standard German infantry rifle of World War I. Saw limited use in World War II, including issue to Adolf Hitler's SS bodyguard unit.
- Gewehr 98/40 Fémárú, Fegyver- és Gépgyár 7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Adaptation of Hungarian 35M rifle to fire 7.92×57mm Mauser ammunition and to mount German bayonets. 138,400 produced from 1941 to 1944. [19]
Karabiner 98a Karabiner 98a Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Karabiner 98b Karabiner 98b Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Karabiner 98k Karabiner 98k Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Kriegsmarine
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Adopted as standard German infantry rifle in 1935. Over 14 million produced from 1934 until German surrender.
Maschinenkarabiner 42(H) Maschinenkarabiner 42(H) C. G. Haenel 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht Accepted after troop trials in 1943, about 8,000 produced. Served as prototype to MP 43.
- M30 Luftwaffe drilling Sauer & Sohn 9.3x74mmR, 12 Gauge[20] Luftwaffe Issued as survival weapon for Luftwaffe aircrews. [21]
Sturmgewehr 44 Sturmgewehr 44 C. G. Haenel 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Evolved from MKb 42(H). First series completed in July 43, first combat use in Eastern Front. Initially named Maschinenpistole 43 and then Maschinenpistole 44.
Sturmgewehr 45 reproduction.png Sturmgewehr 45(M) Mauser-Werke 7.92×33mm Kurz Wehrmacht Experimental lightweight selective-fire weapon, with roller-locked retarded blowback system, only prototypes built prior to end of war. Forefunner of the Spanish CETME 58.
Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 - 7.92×33mm Kurz Volkssturm Intended as a cheap and mass-produced self-loading weapon. First series completed in late 1944.

Machine guns[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Maschinengewehr 08 Maschinengewehr 08 DWM
Spandau
Erfurt
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht Standard machine gun of World War I. Saw limited use in World War II.
Maschinengewehr 30 Maschinengewehr 30 Steyr-Daimler-Puch 7.92×57mm Mauser Luftwaffe
Wehrmacht
Rejected by the Reichswehr but accepted by the Luftwaffe for aircraft use. Later transferred to Wehrmacht ground units.
Maschinengewehr 30(t) Maschinengewehr 30(t) Československá Zbrojovka Brno 7.92×57mm Mauser Waffen-SS Czechoslovak ZB vz. 30 produced under German occupation for Waffen-SS use.
Maschinengewehr 34 Maschinengewehr 34 Mauser-Werke
various others
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Kriegsmarine
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Adapted from MG30 and adopted as standard machine gun in 1934. Issued to German troops starting in 1935.
Maschinengewehr 42 Maschinengewehr 42 Mauser-Werke
Steyr-Daimler-Puch
Gustloff Werke
7.92×57mm Mauser Wehrmacht
Luftwaffe
Waffen-SS
Successor to MG34, adopted in 1942. Over 400,000 produced prior to German surrender.
n/a MG 45 n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Emergency alternative to the MG42.
n/a Barnitzke machine gun n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Proposed MG42 replacement using an unusual delayed blowback operation.
n/a MG 81 n/a 7.92×57mm Mauser n/a Machine gun used by the Luftwaffe.

Submachine guns[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Astra 903 Astra 903 Astra-Unceta y Cia SA 7.63×25mm Mauser Wehrmacht Select-fire version of the Astra 900, itself a clone of the Mauser C96. Approximately 2,000 delivered in 1943. [1]
Beretta Model 38/42 Beretta Model 38/42 Beretta 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Designated Maschinenpistole 738(i) in German service.
Beretta Model 38/44 Beretta Model 38/44 Beretta 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Designated Maschinenpistole 739(i) in German service.
- Erma EMP Československá Zbrojovka Brno 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Not officially adopted, but used in small numbers by the Waffen-SS. [22]
M712 Schnellfeuer Mauser M712 Schnellfeuer Mauser-Werke 7.63×25mm Mauser Wehrmacht Select-fire, removable-magazine version of the Mauser C96 pistol.
Maschinenpistole 18 Maschinenpistole 18 Bergmann Waffenfabrik 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Maschinenpistole 28 Maschinenpistole 28 Bergmann Waffenfabrik 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht Improved version of MP18.
Maschinenpistole 34 Maschinenpistole 34 Waffenfabrik Steyr 9×19mm Parabellum
9×23mm Steyr
Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Feldgendarmerie
Designed by Rheinmetall but produced in Austria by Steyr to evade Treaty of Versailles restrictions. After the Anschluss, produced from 1938 to 1940 for the Waffen-SS. Pre-Anschluss Austrian examples designated Maschinenpistole 34(ö) in German service.
Maschinenpistole 35 Maschinenpistole 35 Bergmann 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Produced from 1935 to 1944. Used primarily by the Waffen-SS.
Maschinenpistole 38 Maschinenpistole 38 Erma Werke 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Maschinenpistole 40 Maschinenpistole 40 Erma Werke 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Fallschirmjäger
Improved version of MP38, utilizing stamped metal parts for easier mass production.
Maschinenpistole 41 Maschinenpistole 41 Haenel 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Combined the receiver, operating mechanism, and magazine housing of the MP40 and the stock, trigger and fire selector of the MP28.
Maschinenpistole 3008 Maschinenpistole 3008 - 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht
Volkssturm
Based on British Sten Mk II, designed as an easy to manufacture last-ditch weapon. Approximately 10,000 produced in 1945.
Suomi KP/-31 Suomi KP/-31 Tikkakoski Oy 9×19mm Parabellum Wehrmacht 3,042 purchased from Finland.
- ZK-383 Československá Zbrojovka Brno 9×19mm Parabellum Waffen-SS Produced in occupied Czechoslovakia for Waffen-SS use. [23]

Anti-tank weapons[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Cartridge Primary User Note References
Granatbüchse 39 Granatbüchse 39 Gustloff Werke - Wehrmacht Conversion of Panzerbüchse 39 to launch rifle grenades.
- Panzerbüchse 38 Gustloff Werke 7.92×94mm Wehrmacht
Panzerbüchse 39 Panzerbüchse 39 Gustloff Werke 7.92×94mm Wehrmacht Improved version of Panzerbüchse 38.
Panzerfaust Panzerfaust - 100mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Volksturm
Disposable single-shot rocket launcher.
Raketenpanzerbüchse 43 Raketenpanzerbüchse 43 - 88mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Popularly referred to as Panzerschreck. Enlarged version of American M1A1 Bazooka.
Raketenpanzerbüchse 54 Raketenpanzerbüchse 54 - 88mm rocket Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Improved version of the Raketenpanzerbüchse 43, adding a blast shield.
Solothurn S-18/1000 Solothurn S-18/1000 Solothurn 20×138mmB Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
- Solothurn S-18/1100 Solothurn 20×138mmB Wehrmacht
Waffen-SS
Full-automatic version of the Solothurn S-18/1000.
Sturmpistole Sturmpistole - - Wehrmacht Modification of standard flare guns to launch grenades.

Other Weapons[edit]

Picture Name Manufacturer Primary User Note References
Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1808-15A, Nordfrankreich, Soldat mit Flammenwerfer.jpg Flammenwerfer 35 Various Wehrmacht Later succeed by improved Flammenwerfer 41 -
- Einstossflammenwerfer 46 Various Fallschirmjäger Cheap produced variant produced for the Volkssturm or the Werwolf movements. -

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

General
  • Fowler, Anthony North; Stronge, Charles (2007), Pistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns, JG Press, ISBN 1-57215-595-7 
  • Hogg, Ian; Weeks, John (2000). Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition. Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-824-7. 
  • Hogg, Ian; Walter, John (2004). Pitols of the World 4th Edition. Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87349-460-1. 
  • Kinard, Jeff (2003). Pistols: an illustrated history of their impact. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1-85109-470-9. 
  • McNab, Chris (2004). The Great Book of Guns. Thunder Bay Press. ISBN 1-59223-304-X. 
Inline
  1. ^ a b c d e f Walter, John, Guns of the Third Reich (2004) pp. 110-111
  2. ^ Hogg, Ian Pistols of the World (2004) pp.111
  3. ^ a b Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.136
  4. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 355
  5. ^ Walter, John, Guns of the Third Reich (2004) p. 105
  6. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 265
  7. ^ Kokalis, Peter. Hungarian Small Arms in Germany's Service. Shotgun News, 2005, Vol 59 Issue 36 p. 12-13.
  8. ^ McNab, Chris, The Great Book of Guns (2004) p. 130
  9. ^ Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 41
  10. ^ a b c Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 46
  11. ^ a b Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.160
  12. ^ Bishop, Chris (2006). The Encyclopedia of Small Arms and Artillery. Grange Books. pp. 13–14. ISBN 978-1-84013-910-5. 
  13. ^ Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.179
  14. ^ McNab, Chris, The Great Book of Guns (2004) p. 159
  15. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 148
  16. ^ Hogg, Ian, Military Small Arms of the 20th Century 7th Edition (2000) p. 47
  17. ^ Hogg, Ian, Pistols of the World 4th Edition (2004) p. 365
  18. ^ a b c Fowler, AnthonyPistols, Revolvers, and Submachine Guns (2007) pp.162
  19. ^ "Mannlicher Gew.98/40 German Infantry Rifle". Manowar's Hungarian Weapons. Retrieved June 10, 2012. 
  20. ^ Fjestad, S.P. (2009). Blue Book of Gun Values 2009. Blue Book Publications. p. 1318. ISBN 1-886768-87-0. 
  21. ^ Kokalis, Peter (May 10, 2009). "Luftwaffe Drilling". Shotgun News. pp. 26–30. 
  22. ^ "Modern Firearms - EMP.35 Erma". world.guns.ru. Retrieved 2012-06-11. 
  23. ^ "Modern Firearms - Zk-383". world.guns.ru. Retrieved 2012-06-11.