List of Yamaha motorcycles

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List of motorcycles manufactured by Yamaha Motor Company


First bikes[edit]

Yamaha YA-1
  • YA-1 built August 1954, produced January 1955. The first bike manufactured by Yamaha was actually a copy of the German DKW RT 125; it had an air-cooled, two-stroke, single cylinder 125 cc engine[1]
  • YC-1 (1956) was the second bike manufactured by Yamaha; it was a 175 cc single cylinder two-stroke.[1]
  • YD-1 (1957) Yamaha began production of its first 250 cc, two-stroke twin, the YD1.[1]
  • MF-1 (1958) 50 cc, two-stroke, single cylinder, step through street bike[1]
  • YDS-3 (1964) 246 cc, two-stroke, parallel-twin, it used the world’s first oil injection lubrication system in a 2-stroke engine.[2]
  • DT-1 (1968) Yamaha's first true off-road motorcycle.[1]
  • XS-1 (1970) Yamaha's first four-stroke engine motorcycle (650 cc twin).[3]
  • Yamaha YZ Monocross (1975) First production motocross bike with a single rear shock.[3]
  • Yamaha YZ400F (1998) First mass-produced four-stroke motocross motorcycle.[3]

Road bikes[edit]

Two-stroke[edit]

Four-stroke[edit]

Step-throughs, scooters, maxi-scooters (Two- and four-stroke)[edit]

Modified Yamaha BW 125 in Girardot, Colombia.

Some of these step-throughs and scooters are made for Southeast Asian markets, where they are known as underbones.

  • Lagenda series (Asia)
  • Yamaha LC50 (Asia)
  • Yamaha MJ50 (Asia)
  • Yamaha V50m(U.K,Europe and Asia)
  • Yamaha C3 50cc (U.S.)
  • Yamaha Lexam (Vietnam)
  • Yamaha Nouvo (Asia)
  • Yamaha Mio (Asia)
  • Yamaha Sirius (Asia)
  • Yamaha X-1 (Asia)
  • Yamaha X-1R (Thailand)
  • Chappy
  • Yamaha Aerox R 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Aerox TY race replica 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Beluga
  • Yamaha BJ 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha BW's NBA 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BW's 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BWs Naked 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BW's 12 inch 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BW's Next Generation 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Force one/ss
  • Yamaha F1ZR/ss two (asia)
  • Yamaha Giggle 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha JogR 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha JogRR 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha JogRR MotoGP 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Jog Deluxe 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Jog ZR 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Jog Poche 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Neo's 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Neo's 4-Stroke 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Slider Naked 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Why 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Vino Classic 50 cc (U.S.)
  • Yamaha Rex 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Zest 50 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Zuma 50 cc (U.S.)
  • Yamaha Vox 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Vino 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Molte Vino 50 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha U7E
  • Yamaha RX-Z 135
  • Y125Z (Asia)
  • Vino 125 (U.S.)
  • Zuma 125 (U.S.)
  • Y135LC/Spark 135/Sniper (Asia)

Maxi-scooters (four-stroke)[edit]

Large scooters with more than 125 cc, and a large chassis and protection from the elements, are very popular in the E.U., Japan, and the US.

One of the smallest of Yamaha's maxi-scooters: Majesty 125
  • Yamaha Axis Grand 100 cc(Japan)
  • Yamaha CygnusX 125 cc (E.U./Japan)
  • Yamaha CygnusX SR 125 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Majesty 125 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Vity 125 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha X-City 125 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BLACK X-MAX 125 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha X-MAX 125 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha X-City 250 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha BLACK X-MAX 250 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha X-MAX 250 cc (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Maxam 250 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha Morphous 250 (CP250VL) (U.S.)
  • Yamaha Majesty 125 cc
  • Yamaha Majesty 250 cc (Japan)
  • YP400 Majesty / ABS (E.U./U.S.)
  • Yamaha X-MAX 400 cc / ABS   (E.U.)
  • Yamaha Grand Majesty 400 cc (Japan)
  • Yamaha TMAX / ABS (E.U./U.S.)
  • Yamaha BLACK TMAX / ABS (E.U.)

Motorcycles (racing)[edit]

Two-Stroke[edit]

Four-Stroke[edit]

Off-road bikes[edit]

A Yamaha motocross bike on display at Phillip Island
Former World Enduro Champion Stefan Merriman on a Yamaha

Trail bike (road oriented)[edit]

Two-stroke[edit]

Four-stroke[edit]

Trail bike (dirt oriented)[edit]

Trials[edit]

Two-stroke[edit]

Four-stroke[edit]

Enduro[edit]

Two-stroke[edit]

Four-stroke[edit]

Trials[edit]

Motocross[edit]

A Yamaha kids bike for beginners.
A Yamaha kids bike for slightly bigger kids.

Two-stroke[edit]

Four-stroke[edit]

Electric motorcycles and scooters[edit]

Concept/prototype motorcycles[edit]

A Yamaha FC-me

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i http://www.starmotorcycles.com/star/company/historyhome/home.aspx
  2. ^ "Yamaha Sports YDS-3". 240 Landmarks of the Japanese Automotive Industry. Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc. Retrieved 10 August 2013. "The Yamaha Autolube system employed a plunger pump as a method for allowing minute amounts of oil to spread over the lubricated surfaces of each engine part." 
  3. ^ a b c http://www.yamaha-motor.com/corporate/historytimeline.aspx, Yamaha website timeline, accessed October 2, 2011
  4. ^ Robert Smith (July–August 2007). "1982 Yamaha XJ650RJ Seca". Motorcycle Classics. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  5. ^ a b Yamaha's folding seated electric scooter, Treehugger.com, May 17, 2005, retrieved 2009-09-07 
  6. ^ Paul Crowe (2007-10-16), Yamaha XS-V1 Sakura for Tokyo Motor Show, The Kneeslider, retrieved 2009-09-07 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ last UK unrestricted moped, and last moped required to have pedals (1977)
  2. ^ built August 1954, produced January 1955. The first bike manufactured by Yamaha; it had an air-cooled, two-stroke, single cylinder 125 cc engine.
  3. ^ (1956) was the second bike manufactured by Yamaha; it was a 175 cc single cylinder two-stroke.
  4. ^ (1957) Yamaha began production of its first 250 cc, two-stroke twin, the YD1.
  5. ^ (1965) single cylinder 80 cc two-stroke)