List of accidents and incidents involving airliners in the United Kingdom

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This list of accidents and incidents on airliners in the United Kingdom summarizes airline accidents that occurred within the territories claimed by the United Kingdom, with information on airline company with flight number, date, and cause.

This list is a subset of the list of accidents and incidents involving airliners by location.

It is also available grouped

This list is dynamic and by no means complete!

For alternative, more exhaustive lists, see:

1910–1919[edit]

1919
  • 1 May – an Aircraft Transport and Travel Airco DH.9 crashed at Portsdown Hill near Portsmouth in fog while operating from Hendon to Bournemouth on the first commercial flight in the United Kingdom; two occupants were killed.[1][2]
  • 20 October – an Aircraft Transport and Travel Airco DH.4A cabin biplane registered G-EAHG crashed into the English Channel in bad weather.[3]
  • 11 December – G-EAHF, an Aircraft Transport and Travel Airco DH.4A, crashed at Caterham near Surrey on a flight from Hounslow to Le Bourget. The pilot and passenger were killed.[3]

1920–1929[edit]

Blériot 155 F-AICQ Clement Ader, which crashed following the first mid-air fire on an airliner
1920
1921
  • 25 January – a Belgian Airco DH.4 registered O-BAIN crashed near the Valiant Sailor pub at Dover Road, in Folkestone.
  • 20 August – G-EARI, an Aircraft Transport and Travel de Havilland DH.18 force-landed and was wrecked at Wallington, Surrey following engine failure.
  • 15 November – a Handley Page Type O suffered engine failure shortly after passing Lympne on a flight from Paris to Croydon, resulting in the loss of a propeller. The aircraft made a forced landing at Lympne, damaging the undercarriage in the process.[9]
1923
1924
1925
  • 8 February – a Farman F.60 Goliath of Air Union crashed whilst attempting to land at Lympne. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Paris to Croydon when an engine failed over the Channel.[12][13]
1926
  • 18 August – Air Union Blériot 155 F-AIEB, named Wilbur Wright, crashed at Hurst, Kent whilst attempting a forced landing due to engine failure. Of the 15 passengers and crew on board, the pilot and two passengers were killed.
  • 2 October – Air Union Blériot 155 F-AICQ, named Clement Ader, crashed at Leigh, Kent following a mid-air fire. All seven passengers and crew were killed.
1927
  • 22 August – a KLM Fokker F.VIII, registration H-NADU, was on a flight from Croydon to Amsterdam when control of the aircraft was lost after the failure of the tailfin. The aircraft crashed into a tree at Underriver, Kent killing one of the eleven people on board.
1928
  • 13 July – Vickers Vulcan G-EBLB of Imperial Airways, conducting a test flight from Croydon Airport with a pilot and five passengers on board, crashed near Purley, Surrey, with the loss of four passengers. As a result of the crash Imperial Airways stopped the flying of staff (so called joy rides) on test flights.
1929
  • 19 May – Air Union Farman F.63bis Goliath F-GEAI,[14] crashed at Keylands Sidings near Paddock Wood railway station, Kent while operating a flight from Croydon to Paris. It stopped yards from the signal box and was destroyed by fire; the pilot and mechanic escaped with minor injuries.[15]
  • 17 June – Imperial Airways' City of Ottawa, a Handley Page W.10 registered G-EBMT, crashed into the English Channel near Dungeness killing seven out of 13.
  • 31 July – Compagnie des Grands Express Aériens Farman Goliath F-GEAB, on a flight from London to Paris carrying gold bullion, was damaged in a forced landing near Smarden in Kent. A hedge stopped the aircraft entering the River Beult although some of the gold bullion it was carrying ended up in the river; the bullion was recovered by spectators.[13][16]
  • 6 November – a Luft Hansa Junkers G 31 registered D-903 and named Oberschlesien crashed into trees at Godstone, Surrey. Six of the seven people on board were killed, including Prince Eugen of Schaumburg-Lippe, who was a member of the crew; aviator and race-car driver Glen Kidston was the only survivor. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled flight from Croydon to Amsterdam.

1930–1939[edit]

1930
1931
  • 17 January – Breguet 280T F-AIVU of Air Union crashed whilst attempting to land at Lympne.[19][20] The aircraft caught the boundary fence and crashed onto the airfield, damaging the forward fuselage and undercarriage.[21] Of the eight people on board, one of the crew was injured.[19]
  • 8 August – Handley Page HP.42 G-AAGX Hannibal made a forced landing at Tatlingbury Farm, Five Oak Green following the failure of the port lower engine whilst on a flight from Croydon to Le Bourget, Paris. The tail of the aircraft was ripped off when it struck a telegraph pole.[22]
1932
  • 17 September – Lioré et Olivier LeO 212 F-AIFE of Air Union crashed at Selsdon Park near Croydon on a Paris to London mail flight, pilot killed.[23][24]
  • 29 October – Junkers W 33 D-2017 Marmara of Luft Hansa was on a freight flight from Croydon to Cologne when it crashed off the Kent coast.[25]
1934
1935
1936
1937
  • 9 December – Handley Page H.P.45 G-AAXD Horatius of Imperial Airways was struck by lightning whilst flying across the Channel from Paris to Croydon. A precautionary landing was made at Lympne where it was found that minor damage had been done to a wing.[35]
  • 13 December – British Airways Lockheed 14 G-AEPP landed at Croydon in a snowstorm and hit a hangar and was destroyed. All four people on board survived with slight injuries.[35]
1938
1939
  • 19 June – Short S.30 Empire flying boat G-AFCW Connemara of Imperial Airways burnt out and sank at Hythe, Hampshire during refuelling. Fire started on the refuelling barge and spread to the flying boat, one of the engineers from the barge was killed.[42]
  • 20 November – Airspeed Oxford G-AFFM being operated by British Airways crashed at Gosport, Hampshire after it hit a barrage balloon cable, two crew killed.[41]

1940–1949[edit]

1940
  • 15 January – A Lockheed 14 G-AFMO of British Airways crashed on take-off at Heston Aerodrome, aircraft destroyed but those on board unhurt.[41][43]
  • 22 April – A Lockheed 14 G-AFKD of BOAC crashed at Beinn Uird, near Loch Lomond, Scotland. Three crew killed.[41][44]
  • 23 May – BOAC Armstrong Whitworth Ensign G-ADTA Euryalus crash-landed at Lympne and was damaged. The aircraft was one of six that escaped after a Luftwaffe raid on Merville Airfield, France. The intended destination was Croydon. Approaching the English coast, first she lost her port inner engine and the pilot set course for Hawkinge. A short time later her starboard inner engine also had to be shut down. The pilot changed course for Lympne. On landing, the starboard undercarriage was not fully down, causing the wing to scrape the ground and the aircraft to go through a fence as no braking was attempted. Euryalus was flown to RAF Hamble in June, but it was decided to cannibalise her to repair G-ADSU Euterpe which had been damaged in an accident at Bonnington on 15 December 1939. Euryalus was officially written off on 15 November 1941 and scrapped in September 1942.[45]
1941
1942
1943
1946
  • 6 November – KLM Douglas DC-3 PH-TBO crashed into trees at Shere, Surrey on approach to Croydon Airport,[51] no fatalities but three slight injuries.[52]
  • 19 December – A Scottish Airways DC-3 G-AGZA crashed into houses on departure from RAF Northolt, Middlesex. There were no injuries amongst the five people on board, or the occupants of the houses. The pilot had taken off with wings contaminated by ice and snow.[53][54]
1947
1948
1949

1950–1959[edit]

Douglas DC-3 EI-ACF, which crashed at Spernall, Warwickshire in 1953.
Vickers Viscount G-ALWE, which crashed at Ringway Airport, Manchester in 1957.
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1956
1957
1958
1959

1960–1969[edit]

British Midland Airways Canadair C-4 Argonaut G-ALHG, which crashed at Stockport on 4 June 1967
BKS Air Transport Airspeed Ambassador G-AMAD, which crashed on landing at Heathrow on 3 July 1968
1960
  • 7 January – BEA Vickers Viscount G-AOHU was damaged beyond economic repair when the nose wheel collapsed on landing at Heathrow Airport. A fire then developed and burnt out the fuselage. There were no casualties among the 59 people on board.[104]
  • 8 March – Skyways Handley Page Hermes G-ALDH starboard undercarriage collapsed during landing at London Heathrow Airport, resulting in the aircraft being written off. None of the six crew were injured in the incident.[105]
  • 9 October – Falcon Airways Handley Page Hermes G-ALDC overran the runway on landing at London Southend Airport ending up across the Shenfield to Southend railway line. The aircraft was written off but all 76 people on board survived.[106]
1961
1962
1963
1965
1966
1967
1968
  • 8 April – BOAC Boeing 707-465 G-ARWE sustained an engine fire on take-off from Heathrow Airport. The engine fell off in flight but the fire could not be extinguished. An emergency landing was made at Heathrow, but four people were killed in the subsequent fire. Stewardess Barbara Jane Harrison was awarded a posthumous George Cross for her actions in the accident. As of 2014, this remains the only George Cross ever awarded directly to a woman in peacetime.
  • 3 July – BKS Air Transport Airspeed Ambassador G-AMAD crashed on landing at Heathrow Airport, London. The crashing aircraft collided with de Havilland Tridents G-ARPI and G-ARPT before ending up embedded in Terminal 1, which was then under construction. G-ARPT was damaged beyond economic repair. G-ARPI was repaired and returned to service, only to be lost in an accident in June 1972.
1969

1970–1979[edit]

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
  • 18 April – Court Line Flight 95, operated by BAC One-Eleven G-AXMJ was involved in a ground collision with Piper PA-23 Aztec G-AYDE during take-off from Luton Airport, Bedfordshire. The Aztec had entered the active runway without permission. The pilot of the Aztec was killed and his passenger was injured. The One-Eleven aborted its take-off and an emergency evacuation was performed with all 93 people on board escaping uninjured. The Aztec was written off and the substantially damaged One-Eleven was repaired and returned to Service.
  • 4 October – Delta Air Transport Douglas DC-6 :OO-VGB was taking off on London Southend Airport runway 24 for a flight to Antwerp International Airport in Belgium when the nose gear collapsed, causing damage and fire to one of the engines. The aircraft stopped before the flight could overrun the runway. All 105 passengers and crew were uninjured in the accident and the DC-6 was written off.[119]
  • 24 December – British Island Airways Handley Page Herald G-BBXJ was written off in a landing accident at Jersey Airport. All 53 people on board escaped uninjured.[120]
1975
1977
1979

1980–1989[edit]

1980
1981
1982
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
  • 21 December – Pan Am Flight 103, operated by Boeing 747-100 N739PA en route from London Heathrow Airport to John F. Kennedy International Airport was blown up just after crossing the England-Scotland border. The terrorist attack was conducted by Libyan Abdelbaset al-Megrahi. All 243 passengers and 16 crew members on board the aircraft were killed as well as 11 residents of Lockerbie – the town on which a large percentage of the debris fell - which leaves a total of 270 deaths. As of 2014, this remains the deadliest terrorist attack in the United Kingdom.
1989

1990–1999[edit]

1990
1992
1994
1995
1996
1997
  • 5 November – a Virgin Atlantic Airways Airbus A340-311 suffered a partial undercarriage failure while being prepared for a landing at London Heathrow Airport. After numerous attempts to free the jammed left main undercarriage, an emergency landing was made. The aircraft suffered substantial damage. Seven of the 114 people on board were slightly injured in the subsequent emergency evacuation.[137] The aircraft was repaired and returned to service.[138]
  • 7 December – Air UK Fokker F-27 Mk 500 G-BNCY overran the runway on landing at Guernsey Airport and was damaged beyond economic repair. There were no injuries amongst the 54 people on board.[139]
1998
1999

2000–2009[edit]

The crash-landing of British Airways Flight 38 on 17 January 2008 received worldwide media attention despite there being only minor injuries among the occupants.
2000
2001
2002
2005
2006
  • 15 June – TNT Airways Flight 325N was operated by Boeing 737-301F OO-TND on a scheduled international cargo flight from Liège, Belgium to London Stansted Airport, Essex. On arrival at Stansted, the visibility was too poor to allow a landing. The aircraft diverted to East Midlands Airport, Leicestershire where it landed heavily on the grassed area to the left of the runway. A go-around was initiated but the starboard undercarriage was ripped off when it touched down off the runway. A further diversion was made to Birmingham Airport, West Midlands where a successful emergency landing was made. The aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair but both crew escaped uninjured.[150]
2007
  • 18 August – Swiss European Air Lines Flight 444, a scheduled international passenger flight from Geneva, Switzerland to London, was operated by Avro RJ100 HB-IYU. The aircraft was substantially damaged in a hard landing at London City Airport. All 93 people on board escaped uninjured. The aircraft was repaired and returned to service.[151]
2008
  • 17 January – British Airways Flight 38 operated by Boeing 777-236 G-YMMM, was a scheduled international passenger flight from Beijing, China to London. It suffered a double engine failure on approach to Heathrow, landing short of the threshold. The aircraft was written off, the first for a Boeing 777. There were 47 injuries amongst the 152 people on board. The double engine failure was caused by ice in the fuel blocking the fuel-oil heat exchangers on both engines.
2009
  • 13 February – BA CityFlyer Flight 8456 was a scheduled international passenger flight from Amsterdam to London City Airport. It was operated by Avro RJ100 G-BXAR. On landing a London City, the nose gear collapsed. All 72 people on board evacuated by the emergency escape slides. The aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair.[152]

Since 2010[edit]

There have been no accidents or incidents in the United Kingdom sufficiently notable to be added to this list so far.

Notes[edit]

  1. This article only lists accidents and incidents involving civilian or privately chartered aircraft (i.e. excluding military crashes).
  2. Where flight numbers were not used or are not available, the aircraft tail number is listed instead.
  3. For the purpose of this article, airports involved in airliner accidents and incidents are listed by the title they went by when the incident occurred.
  4. As the article heading states, only accidents and incidents on United Kingdom soil or within British airspace are listed; flights associated with UK airports are not included (i.e. accidents and incidents on aircraft that have left the UK's airports or were bound for them).
  5. Links in italics are links to an article on the accident or incident.
  6. Accidents and incidents highlighted in bold resulted in 50+ fatalities.
  7. For the purposes of this article, the term "United Kingdom" shall include the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. It shall also include the Republic of Ireland for any accident occurring before 1923, when the 26 counties formed part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations
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  18. ^ Humphreys 2001, pp. 82–83.
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  69. ^ Poole 1999, pp. 123–24.
  70. ^ Poole 1999, pp. 124–25.
  71. ^ "One Saved as Plane Plunges in Mersey". Ottawa Citizen, 11 November 1948. p.18.
  72. ^ "One Man Survives Crash of Plane". St. Petersburg Times, 13 November 1948, p.3
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  74. ^ "Civil Aviation News: Rapide Accident Report". Flight, 25 August 1949, p. 229.
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  79. ^ "G-AHJJ Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
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  82. ^ "G-AHPN Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  83. ^ Civil Aviation Authority 1974, p. 5/51
  84. ^ Poole 1999, pp. 126–27.
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  102. ^ Civil Aviation Authority 1974, p. 21/58
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  150. ^ "OO-TND Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  151. ^ "HB-IYU Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  152. ^ "G-BXAR Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
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