List of accidents and incidents involving the Convair CV-240 family

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List of accidents and incidents involving the Convair CV-240 family
Convair-240-color.jpg
A restored Convair CV-240 in Western Air Lines livery, at the Planes of Fame Museum in Chino, California

The Convair CV-240 was an American airliner produced by Convair from 1947 to 1954, initially as a possible replacement of the ubiquitous Douglas DC-3. While featuring a more modern design, the 240 series was able to make some inroads as a commercial airliner and also had a long development cycle which resulted in a number of civil and military variants. Although reduced in numbers through attrition, the "Convairliners" in various forms continue to fly into the 21st century.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Like every other major type in long service and operation, accidents and incidents have been recorded that have substantially reduced the numbers flying. The following list is typical of such a record of operational use.

Convair CV-240/CV-300/T-29/C-131[edit]

  • January 22, 1952: American Airlines Flight 6780, a CV-240-0, crashed in downtown Elizabeth, New Jersey in the first fatal accident after a record 840,000 safe flying hours. All 23 occupants on board (20 passengers and 3 crew) plus 7 people on the ground were killed in the crash and ensuing fire; because of insufficient evidence, the cause was not determined.
  • September 16, 1953: American Airlines Flight 723, a CV-240-0, struck radio towers and crashed near Albany, New York. All 28 on board were killed.
  • January 20, 1954: American Airlines Flight 767, a CV-240-0, crashed during takeoff from Buffalo Niagara International Airport. It suffered engine failure and landed 200 yards south of 2478 George Urban Boulevard, Depew, New York. Several injuries were reported but no deaths as the plane failed to gain altitude after the left engine failed. No fire was reported but the presence of fuel made the muddy, shallow swamp a fire hazard. The plane remained mostly intact, coming to rest against a small clump of large trees. The flight was en route to Detroit, Michigan after starting the day in Albany, New York.
  • June 19, 1954: A Swissair CV-240-4 ditched in the English Channel near Folkestone due to fuel starvation; all nine on board were able to escape, but three drowned.
  • March 20, 1955: American Airlines Flight 711, a CV-240-0, struck the ground during final approach in Springfield, Missouri. Of the 35 people aboard, there were 22 survivors.
  • August 4, 1955: American Airlines Flight 476, a CV-240-0 (N94221), crashed near Forney AAF, Missouri due to an engine fire caused by an uncontained engine failure and resultant wing separation, killing all 30 passengers and crew on board.
  • January 6, 1957: An American Airlines CV-240-0 (N94247) crashed near Tulsa International Airport due to crew error, killing one of 10 on board.
  • July 25, 1957: Saul Brinstock, a retired North Hollywood jeweler, committed suicide by detonating a bomb in the rear lavoratory of Western Airlines Flight 39. Binstock had purchased two insurance policies totaling $125,000. The plane landed safely. Only Brinstock was killed.
  • May 15, 1958: Pakistan International Airlines Flight 205, a CV-240-7 (AP-AEH), crashed on climbout from Palam Airport due to pilot error, killing 21 of 38 on board and two on the ground.
  • January 22, 1959: Air Jordan Flight 601, a Convair CV-240-2 (JY-ACB), crashed in a field in Wadi es Sir near Amman, Jordan, killing 10 of 15 on board.
  • July 31, 1960: A Deutsche Flugdienst CV-240-4 (D-BELU) crashed short of the runway at Rimini Airport due to double engine failure, killing one of 34 on board.
  • May 9, 1962: A Cruzeiro do Sul CV-240-0 registration PP-CEZ on final approach to Vitória struck a tree at a height of 40m, 1,860m short of the runway. It should have been at 150m. Of the 31 passengers and crew aboard, 28 died.[1][2]
  • December 22, 1962: a Varig Convair CV-240-2 (PP-VCQ) flying from Rio de Janeiro to Brasília via Belo Horizonte-Pampulha descended below the prescribed altitude while on final approach to Brasília, struck trees, skidded and fell to one side. One crew member died.[3]
  • January 15, 1963: a Cruzeiro do Sul CV-240-0 registration PP-CEV on approach to São Paulo-Congonhas crashed into houses in the neighborhood of Jabaquara after an engine failed. Of the 45 passengers and crew aboard, 6 died. Six persons on the ground were also killed.[4][5]
  • February 27, 1964: Fujita Airlines Flight 902, a CV-240-0, overran the runway on landing at Oita Airport and crashed in the dried-up Urakawa River, killing 20 of 42 on board.
  • January 25, 1970: A CV-240-2 from the Mexican Government carrying journalists crashed into a hill, killing all but one of the 20 people on board.
  • January 9, 1975: USAF T-29D (CV-240) 52-5826 operating as Flight M32 collided in mid-air with a Cessna 150H (N50430) over the Atlantic Ocean off Newport News, Virginia, killing all nine on board both aircraft.
  • October 20, 1977: Six persons were killed, including three members of the southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd when Convair CV-300 N55VM crashed near a forest in Gillsburg, Mississippi. The probable cause of the crash was fuel exhaustion and total loss of power from both engines. The pilot, co-pilot and the band's assistant road manager were among the dead. Some 20 other passengers survived, some with terrible injuries.

Convair CV-340[edit]

  • March 16, 1954: Continental Airlines Flight 46, a CV-340-35 (N90853), belly-landed in a field near Midland, Texas after takeoff due to loss of control caused by improper maintenance; all 11 passengers and crew survived, but the aircraft was written off.[6]
  • July 17, 1955: Braniff International Airways Flight 560, a CV-340-32 (N3422), struck a gas station sign while on final approach to Chicago Midway Airport. The aircraft then crashed through the airport boundary fence and came to rest upside down. A total of 22 of the 43 people on board died.[7]
  • October 10, 1955: A JAT Yugoslav Airlines CV-340-58 (YU-ADC) crashed on approach to Schwechat International Airport after descending too low, killing seven of 29 on board.[8]
  • December 22, 1956: A JAT Yugoslav Airlines CV-340-58 (YU-ADA) crashed on approach to Riem Airport due to excessive descent, killing three of 30 on board.[9]
  • June 24, 1960: A Real Transportes Aéreos Convair CV-340-62 (PP-YRB) crashed into Guanabara Bay. All five crew and 49 passengers were killed. The cause was undetermined.[10][11]
  • December 17, 1960: USAF C-131D Samaritan (CV-340) 55-0291 crashed due to fuel contamination shortly after take-off from Munich-Riem Airport downtown Munich, Germany killing all 20 on board as well as 32 on the ground in an accident known as the 1960 Munich Convair 340 crash.
  • May 3, 1963: A Cruzeiro do Sul CV-340-59 registration PP-CDW flying from São Paulo-Congonhas to Rio de Janeiro-Santos Dumont had to return to São Paulo after no. 2 engine caught fire. When on finals to touchdown, the aircraft nosed up 45°, stalled and struck a house. Of the 50 passengers and crew aboard, 37 died.[12][13]
  • July 8, 1968: A Saudia CV-340-68 crashed at Dhahran International Airport after repeating landing attempts due to poor visibility caused by blowing dust, killing all 11 on board.
  • September 26, 1975: US Navy C-131F (CV-340) 141012 crashed on climbout from El Toro MCAS after a loss of altitude after takeoff, killing four of six on board.
  • April 30, 1983: US Navy C-131F (CV-340) 141010 crashed off Jacksonville NAS after reporting an engine fire; of the 15 on board, only a passenger survived.
  • March 15, 2012: A Jet One Express Convair CV-340 (N153JR) operating as a cargo flight crashed shortly after takeoff from Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport after reporting a "Type 2 Emergency". Both crew members died in the accident. The crash was in "Laguna La Torrecilla" Carolina, Puerto Rico.[14]

Convair CV-440[edit]

  • July 15, 1956: A CV-440-11 (HB-IMD) was being delivered to Swissair when it crashed at Shannon Airport due to pilot error, killing the four crew.
  • September 18, 1957: A Real Transportes Aéreos CV-440-62 registration PP-AQE belonging to Transportes Aéreos Nacional, flying from Porto Alegre to Montevideo had an accident during touch down operations in Montevideo. While on a night landing procedure under fog, the aircraft undershot the runway by 1,030m, causing the left and middle gear to hit an earth bank bordering a highway. The right wing touched the ground and further on, the aircraft lost both propellers. The right wing then broke off. One crew member died.[15]
  • June 16, 1958: Cruzeiro do Sul, a Convair CV-440-59 registration PP-CEP flying from Florianópolis to Curitiba-Afonso Pena was on final approach procedures to land at Curitiba in bad weather when it was caught in windshears. The aircraft descended and struck the ground. Of the 27 passengers and crew aboard, 24 died.[16][17]
  • October 12, 1962: An Iberia CV440-62 (EC-ATB), c/n 443, crashed on approach to Sevilla (Spain) killing all 14 passengers and four crew on board.
  • November 20, 1964: Linjeflyg Flight 267V, a Convair CV-440, crashed during an approach at Ängelholm. In instrument conditions, the crew abandoned the set procedure and began the landing too soon. The reason for this must have been that the crew allowed themselves to be misled by an arrangement of lights peculiar to the airfield with which, apart from certain information received during the approach, they were not acquainted. A total of 31 of 43 people were killed in Sweden's worst-ever air disaster.
  • March 31, 1965: An Iberia CV-440-62 (EC-ATH), c/n 388, crashed 11 mi off Tangier Airport for reasons unknown, killing 48 passengers and five crew. There were four survivors.
  • January 28, 1966: Lufthansa Flight 005, a CV-440-0, crashed on landing after an approach in low visibility to Bremen, Germany. All 46 passengers and crew on board lost their lives.
  • February 10, 1967: A Swissair CV-440-11 (HB-IMF) struck Mount Lägern during a training flight, killing the four crew.
  • March 13, 1974: A film crew for Wolper Productions filming a National Geographic history of Australopithecus at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area was killed when the Sierra Pacific Airlines CV-440 (operating as Flight 802) exploded on take off from Eastern Sierra Regional Airport in Bishop, California killing 36 on board including 31 Wolper crew members, although not Wolper himself. The filmed segment was recovered in the wreckage and was broadcast in the television show Primal Man. The National Transport Safety Board (US) has never been able to determine the cause of the crash.[18]
  • October 27, 1975: A Transporte Aéreo Militar (TAM) CV-440-12 (TAM-44) crashed in the Cerro Colorado mountains after failing to gain height due to overloading, killing all 67 on board in the worst-ever accident involving the Convair 440.
  • May 20, 1981: An Aero Léon CV-440-11 (XA-HEK) struck Pinarete Mountain en route to Oaxaca from Puerto Escondido, killing all 24 on board.
  • August 21, 1992: A Servicios Aéreos Santa Ana (SASA) CV-440-80 (CP-1961) struck Mount Chacaltaya at 15,000 feet while descending for La Paz, killing all 10 on board.
  • July 12, 2004: A Dodita Air Cargo CV-440 (N4826C) ditched 34 mi off Beef Island, British Virgin Islands due to an unexplained in-flight fire, killing the pilot; the co-pilot survived.

Convair CV-580[edit]

Convair CV-600[edit]

Convair CV-640[edit]

  • September 17, 1969: Pacific Western Airlines Flight 627, a CV-640, crashed near Campbell River Airport after the crew deviated from the approach procedure, killing four of 15 on board in the first fatal accident involving the Convair 640.
  • February 9, 1992: A Gambcrest CV-640 (N862FW) crashed near Diouloulou, Senegal after the pilot mistook the lights of a hotel for runway lights, killing 31 of 59 on board in the worst-ever accident involving the Convair 640.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Accident description PP-CEZ." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: July 16, 2011.
  2. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O velho lutador". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 204–207. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  3. ^ "Accident description PP-VCQ." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: May 16, 2011.
  4. ^ "Accident description PP-CEV". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  5. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Betelgeuse". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 229–232. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  6. ^ Accident description for N90853 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on May 31, 2014.
  7. ^ Accident description for N3422 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on May 31, 2014.
  8. ^ Accident description for YU-ADC at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on May 31, 2014.
  9. ^ Accident description for YU-ADA at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on May 31, 2014.
  10. ^ "Accident description PP-YRB." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: May 16, 2011.
  11. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O mistério da ilha dos Ferros". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 190–193. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  12. ^ "Accident description PP-CDW." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: August 17, 2011
  13. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Esquecimento fatal". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 233–238. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  14. ^ "Crash: Jet One Express CVLP at San Juan on Mar 15th 2012, engine trouble" The Aviation Herald Retrieved: March 15, 2012.
  15. ^ "Accident description PP-AQE." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: July 16, 2011.
  16. ^ "Accident description PP-CEP." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: May 6, 2011.
  17. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Tesoura de vento". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 165–168. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  18. ^ "The 'Primal Man' Crash, Near Bishop, California, March 13, 1974." check-six.com. Retrieved: December 22, 2010.
  19. ^ "Lake Central Airlines CV-580." ntsb.gov. Retrieved: September 1, 2010.
  20. ^ Aviation Safety Network: ASN Aircraft accident Convair 580 N2045 Chicago-O’Hare International Airport
  21. ^ National Transportation Safety Board Report Number NTSB-AAR-70-27 “Aircraft Accident Report North Central Airlines, Inc., Convair 580, N2045, O’Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois, December 27, 1968,” adopted November 12, 1970
  22. ^ Aviation Safety Network: ASN Aircraft accident Convair CV-580 N90858 Appleton, WI
  23. ^ National Transportation Safety Board Report Number NTSB-AAR-73-09 “Aircraft Accident Report North Central Airlines, Inc., Allison Convair 340/440 (CV-580), N90858, and Air Wisconsin, Inc., DHC-6, N4043B, Near Appleton, Wisconsin, June 29, 1972,” adopted April 25, 1973
  24. ^ "NTSB Report: Air Tahoma CV-580 N586P crash." ntsb.gov. Retrieved: September 1, 2010.
  25. ^ "NTSB Report: Air Tahoma CV-580 N587X crash." ntsb.gov. Retrieved: September 1, 2010.
  26. ^ "Accident description C-FKFY Airtanker 48." Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved: May 16, 2011.
Bibliography
  • Frawley, Gerald. "Convair CV-540, 580, 600, 640 & CV5800", The International Directory of Civil Aircraft 1997/98. Fyshwick ACT: Aerospace Publications, 1997. ISBN 1-875671-26-9.
  • Gradidge, Jennifer. The Convairliners Story. Tonbridge, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd, 1997, ISBN 0-85130-243-2.
  • Wegg, John. General Dynamics Aircraft and their Predecessors. London: Putnam, 1990. ISBN 0-85177-833-X.

External links[edit]