List of accidents and incidents involving the Vickers Viscount

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This aircraft, D-ANEF, later crashed while landing on 28 January 1972[1]

As World War II came to a close the British government realised that it was going to have to drastically change its air manufacture industry to avoid becoming dependent on American aircraft companies. To address this issue the Brabazon Committee was formed in 1943 to investigate the future needs of the British Empire's civilian airliner market. As a direct result of the specifications spelled out by the Brabazon Committee the Vickers Viscount was created. A medium-range turboprop airliner first flown in 1948 by Vickers-Armstrongs, making it the first such aircraft to enter service in the world. It would go on to be one of the most successful of the first-generation post-war transports, with 445 being built.

Of that relatively large number of 445 aircraft there have been over 150 accidents and incidents, including 144 hull losses. An accident or incident can involve anything from slight damage to total write-off and crash with all people on board killed. The first incident was on 27 August 1952 when G-AHRF, operated by the UK Ministry of Supply crashed at the Khartoum International Airport.[2] Eventually, with many newer aircraft designs available, the Viscount was phased out of operations by industrial nations but one remains airworthy (as of April 2010) in the undeveloped world, and another remains flyable in the United States. In April 2003, 9Q-CGL of Trans Intair was damaged on landing at a gravel strip in the Congo. The pilots attempted to take off with damaged engines but as the aircraft was gaining altitude a second engine failed and the aircraft crashed into some trees becoming a total write-off.[3]

1950s[edit]

G-ALWE at Ringway in 1953
  • On 23 October 1957, G-AOJA of British European Airways was damaged beyond economic repair when it crashed on approach to Nutts Corner Airport, Belfast, killing all seven on board.[14]
G-AOHJ of BEA, sister aircraft to G-AOHP
  • On 17 November 1957, G-AOHP of British European Airways crashed at Ballerup after the failure of three engines on approach to Copenhagen Airport. The cause was a malfunction of the anti-icing system on the aircraft.[15]
  • On 12 November 1958, ZK-BRD of National Airways Corporation, New Zealand, belly landed by mistake when touching down at Whenuapai Airport. The pilot was flying in the righthand seat and inavertly pulled the undercarriage lever instead of the flaps lever on 'touchdown'. Moderate damage was done to the airframe, but repaired and put back into service.[25]
  • On 14 August 1959, AP-AJE of Pakistan International Airlines crashed at Karachi International Airport while attempting an overshoot with two engines inoperative on a training flight. Two of the three people on board were killed.[33]
  • On 2 October 1959, a Viscount of Cubana de Aviación was hijacked on a flight from Havana to Antonio Maceo Airport, Santiago. The aircraft landed at Miami International Airport.[34]
  • On 3 November 1959, CF-TGY of Trans-Canada Air Lines was written off when it landed short of the runway at Toronto-Malton Airport.[35]
  • On 21 December 1959, I-LIZT of Alitalia crashed short of the runway at Ciampino Airport, Rome on a training flight exercise in landing with two engines inoperative. Both people on board were killed.[36]
  • On 22 December 1959, a VASP Vickers Viscount 827 registration PP-SRG while on approach to land at Rio de Janeiro-Galeão was involved in a mid-air collision with the Brazilian Air Force Fokker S-11 (T-21) registration FAB0742 in the vicinity of Manguinhos Airport. All 32 people on board the Viscount were killed, as were a further ten on the ground. The T-21 pilot parachuted to safety. This accident eventually led to the closure of Manguinhos Airport[37][38][39]

1960s[edit]

  • On 5 January 1960, G-AMNY of British European Airways was damaged beyond economic repair at Luqa Airport when it departed the runway after landing following a loss of hydraulic pressure.[40] Unable to brake or steer, the aircraft struck the limestone tower, trapping the pilot. There were no fatalities, but the fuselage was substantially damaged. The cause was a malfunctioning check valve in the hydraulic system.
  • On 7 January 1960, G-AOHU of British European Airways was damaged beyond economic repair when the nose wheel collapsed on landing at Heathrow Airport. A fire then developed and burnt out the fuselage. There were no casualties among the 59 people on board.[41]
  • On 29 September 1960, SU-AKW of United Arab Airlines broke up in mid-air and crashed 27.5 kilometres (17.1 mi) north of Elba. All 23 people on board were killed.[46]
  • On 16 March 1962, SU-AID of United Arab Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair when it crash landed 3 miles (4.8 km) short of Wadi Haifa Airport due to fuel exhaustion.[53]
  • On 10 October 1962, CF-THA of Trans-Canada Air Lines was involved in a ground collision with CF-101 Voodoo 17452 of the Royal Canadian Air Force at Sept-Îles Airport. The Voodoo had been given clearance to take-off before the Viscount had cleared the runway. It collided with the tail of the Viscount, killing a flight attendant and a passenger. The crew of the Voodoo ejected as the aircraft had been set on fire as a result of the collision. The Viscount was substantially damaged but it was repaired and returned to service.[55]
  • On 19 November 1962, JA8202 of All Nippon Airways crashed at Nagoya while on a training flight, killing all four people on board.[56]
  • On 29 January 1963, N242V of Continental Air Lines crashed at Kansas City Downtown Municipal Airport when pitch control was lost due to ice accretion on the horizontal stabilizer. All eight people on board were killed.[59]
  • On 1 February 1963, OD-ADE of Middle East Airlines was in a mid-air collision with C-47 CBK28 of the Turkish Air Force. Both aircraft crashed in Ankara, killing all 14 on board the Viscount, all three on board the C-47 and a further 87 people on the ground.[60]
  • On 17 February 1963, Vickers 807 Viscount, ZK-BWO, "City of Dunedin" of the National Airways Corporation overran the southern end of the runway at Wellington New Zealand, sliding down onto Moa Point Road. Minor damage sustained.[61]
  • On 12 August 1963, F-BGNV of Air Inter was damaged beyond economic repair when it crashed on approach to Lyon-Bron Airport in a storm. Fifteen of the 16 people on board were killed. One person on the ground was also killed.[63]
  • On 11 September 1963, VT-DIO of Indian Airlines crashed 51 kilometres (32 mi) south of Agra, killing all 18 people on board.[64]
  • On 21 April 1964, OD-ACX of Middle East Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair at El Arish.[67]
  • On 4 September 1964, PP-SRR of VASP crashed into Pico da Caledonia, Nova Friburgo. The aircraft was 35 kilometres (22 mi) off course at the time. All 39 people on board were killed.[70][71]
A Viscount of Cambrian Airways
  • On 20 August 1965, SP-LVA of LOT Polskie Linie Lotnicze crashed at Jeuk after entering a thundercell. All four people on board were killed.[76]
  • On 19 January 1967, N7431 of United Air Lines was damaged beyond economic repair when it collided with a snow tractor on the runway at Norfolk International Airport.[79]
A Viscount of Aer Lingus
  • On 21 September 1967, EI-AKK of Aer Lingus was damaged beyond economic repair when it made a wheels-up landing at Bristol Lulsgate Airport.[84]
  • On 8 December 1967, FAB2100 of Força Aérea Brasiliera was written off at Rio de Janeiro Santos Dumont Airport when the undercarriage malfunctioned.[86]
  • On 11 December 1967, N7429 of United Air Lines was damaged beyond economic repair when it overran the runway at Akron-Canton Airport.[87]
  • On 24 March 1968, EI-AOM, operating Aer Lingus Flight 712 broke up in mid-air and crashed into the Irish Sea, killing all 61 on board. Speculation that the aircraft had been shot down by the Royal Air Force was finally ruled out in 2002, with a structural failure of the port tailplane identified as a likely cause.[88]
  • On 4 May 1968, G-APPU of Channel Airways overran the runway on landing at Southend Airport having landed at too high a speed. The aircraft was written off.[89]
A Viscount of British Eagle
  • On 11 September 1968, a Viscount of Air Canada was reported to have been hijacked by a Cuban passenger.[91]
  • On 15 September 1968, PP-SRE of VASP crashed at São Paulo while on a crew training flight. One of the two crew was killed.[92]
  • On 28 December 1968, OD-ACT of Middle East Airlines was destroyed in a raid by Israeli Commandos at Beirut International Airport.[93]
  • On 20 March 1969, G-AVJA of British Midland Airways crashed on take-off at Ringway Airport, Manchester. Three of the four people on board were killed.[97]
  • On 7 April 1969, CF-THK of Air Canada was damaged beyond economic repair by a fire which occurred on take-off from Sept-Îles Airport. The aircraft landed back at Sept-Îles but one passenger was killed in the fire.[98]
  • On 16 September 1969, a Viscount of Turk Hava Yollari was hijacked and landed in Sofia.[100]

1970s[edit]

  • On 9 August 1971, VT-DIX of Indian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair when it overran the runway at Jaipur Airport. The aircraft was landed with a tailwind on a wet runway.[110]
  • On 20 October 1971, a Viscount of SAETA was hijacked by six people. It landed at Cuenca Airport.[111]
D-ANEF at Köln-Bonn in 1960
  • On 5 April 1972, a Viscount of Merpati Nusantara Airlines was the subject of an attempted hijacking. The hijacker was killed.[116]
  • On 27 October 1972, F-BMCH of Air Inter crashed into the Pic du Picon, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) west of Noirétable, Loire. Sixty of the 68 people on board were killed.[118]
  • On 15 May 1973, PP-SRD of VASP was damaged beyond economic repair when it departed the runway on landing at Salvador Airport and the undercarriage collapsed.[121]
  • On 8 June 1974, HK-1058 of Aerolíneas TAO crashed at Monte San Isidoro after the structural failure of the port tailplane in flight. All 44 people on board were killed.[124]
  • On 1 February 1975, PK-RVM of Mandala Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair when it overran the runway at Taipei Songshan Airport.[127]
  • On 31 July 1975, B-2029 of Far Eastern Air Transport crashed at Taipei Songshan Airport killing 27 of the 75 people on board.[131]
  • On 29 December 1977, HC-BEM of SAN Ecuador crashed into a hill near Cuenca. All 24 people on board were killed.[137]
  • On 3 September 1978, VP-WAS operating Air Rhodesia Flight 825 was shot down by a SAM-7 missile killing 28 of the 56 people on board. A further ten people were killed by ZIPRA guerillas. The accident site was in the Whamira Hills.[139]
  • On 12 February 1979, VP-YND, operating Air Rhodesia Flight 827 was shot down by a SAM-7 missile and crashed in the Vuti African Purchase Area near Kariba killing all 59 people on board. ZIPRA guerilla were responsible for the shoot-down.[140]
A Viscount in Alidair livery
  • On 25 October 1979, G-BFYZ of Alidair was damaged beyond economic repair when the aircraft departed the runway at Kirkwall Airport after #4 propeller struck the runway. The nosewheel collapsed when the aircraft reached an intersecting runway.[142]

1980s[edit]

  • On 17 July 1980, G-ARBY of Alidair crashed at Ottery St Mary when all four engines failed due to fuel exhaustion. All 62 people on board survived.[144]
  • On 26 August 1980, PK-IVS of Far Eastern Air Transport suffered an in-flight failure of the starboard elevator and crashed 26 kilometres (16 mi) north east of Jakarta killing all 37 people on board.[145]
  • On 28 August 1980, VT-DJC of Huns Air was damaged beyond economic repair when the nosewheel collapsed after the aircraft bounced three times on landing at Vijayawada Airport.[146]
  • In July 1984, Z-YNI of Air Zimbabwe was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident on the ground at Harare International Airport. It was withdrawn from use as a result and passed to the airports fire department for use as a training aid.[152][153]

1990s[edit]

  • On 27 July 1992, XA-SCM of Aero Eslava flew into Cerro Xocotlihuipa at an altitude of 10,130 feet (3,090 m), killing all four people on board. The aircraft had been authorised to descend to 12,000 feet (3,700 m).[164]
  • On 25 February 1994, G-OHOT of British World Airways crashed 7.5 kilometres (4.7 mi) south west of Uttoxeter after suffering multiple engine failures in icing conditions. One of the two crew was killed.[166]
  • On 26 September 1994, PK-IVU of Bouraq Indonesia Airlines was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Pontianak Airport. The aircraft was repaired and returned to service.[167]
  • On 6 June 1997, 9Q-CWL of Bazair suffered an onboard fire and crashed at Irumu, killing all 23 people on board.[169]

2000s[edit]

  • On 24 July 2001, 3D-OHM of Transtel was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at N'Djamena International Airport when the aircraft departed the runway, damaging the engines and propellors.[170] Although written off by the insurers, the aircraft was repaired. Repairs were almost complete when a soldier accidentally discharged his firearm, puncturing a fuel tank.[171]
  • In April 2003, 9Q-CGL of Trans Intair was damaged on landing at a gravel strip in the Congo. A take-off with only three engines operable was attempted but a second engine failed and the aircraft crashed into some trees. The aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair.[3]

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