List of bats of Madagascar

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Bats are one of the major components of the indigenous mammalian fauna of Madagascar, in addition to tenrecs, lemurs, euplerid carnivores, and nesomyine rodents. Forty-six bat species have so far been recorded on Madagascar, of which thirty-five occur only on the island. However, new species continue to be discovered, causing the number of species to rise rapidly; for example, Nick Garbutt's Mammals of Madagascar (2007) listed only 36 species.[1] Most Malagasy bats have their origins in nearby mainland Africa, but on at least three occasions—Pipistrellus raceyi, Pteropus rufus, and the species pair Emballonura atrataE. tiavato—bats have colonized Madagascar from Asia.[2]

Taxonomic classification[edit]

The following bat genera and families include species found on Madagascar (all species counts are for Madagascar only):

Key[edit]

Scientific name Scientific name of the species
Classified Year when the species was formally described and classified, as well as the binomial authority of the species
Distribution Geographic distribution of the species. Abbreviations used are S, south; N, north; E, east; W, west; C, central; SW, southwest; etcetera.
Forearm Range in forearm length of adult members of the species, in metric and English units
Conservation status Conservation status of the species, per IUCN as of 2008, except as indicated. "Not evaluated" is used to indicate that no IUCN status assessment is available.

Family Pteropodidae[edit]

Pteropodidae are a diverse family, with 186 species recognized in 2005,[3] which occurs across the tropical regions of the Old World. They include the largest bats, but also some smaller species, and are mostly diurnal and frugivorous. Three species are known from Madagascar; each is classified in its own genus and is most closely related to species from outside Madagascar.[4]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Eidolon dupreanum[Note 1] 1866, Pollen Madagascar only 115 to 130 mm (4.5 to 5.1 in) Vulnerable [6]
Pteropus rufus 1803, E. Geoffroy Madagascar only 155 to 175 mm (6.1 to 6.9 in) Vulnerable [7]
Rousettus madagascariensis[Note 2] 1928, G. Grandidier Madagascar only; absent in SW 65 to 75 mm (2.6 to 3.0 in) Near Threatened [9]

Family Hipposideridae[edit]

Hipposideridae are a moderately diverse family—81 species were listed in 2005[3]—and occur across the Old World tropics. Insectivorous, cave-roosting, and characterized by an elaborate noseleaf, they have often been united with the horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus; absent from Madagascar) into a single family Rhinolophidae, but are currently classified separately. Six species, all endemic, are known from Madagascar, of which four are extant. Hipposideros commersoni is the largest non-pteropodid bat of Madagascar and the extinct Hipposideros besaoka was even larger. The other species belong to the closely related genera Triaenops and Paratriaenops; the latter was split from Triaenops in 2009 and is restricted to Madagascar and the western Seychelles.[10]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Hipposideros besaoka 2007, Samonds Anjohibe, NW Madagascar only Extinct[Note 3] [11]
Hipposideros commersoni 1813, E. Geoffroy Madagascar only 83 to 97 mm (3.3 to 3.8 in) Near Threatened [12]
Paratriaenops auritus[Note 4] 1912, G. Grandidier N and NW Madagascar only 44 to 51 mm (1.7 to 2.0 in) Vulnerable[Note 5] [14]
Paratriaenops furculus[Note 4] 1906, Trouessart W and SW Madagascar only 42 to 49 mm (1.7 to 1.9 in) Least Concern[Note 6] [15]
Triaenops goodmani 2007, Samonds Anjohibe, NW Madagascar only Extinct[Note 3] [16]
Triaenops menamena[Note 7] 2009, Goodman and Ranivo N, W, and S Madagascar only 46 to 56 mm (1.8 to 2.2 in) Least Concern[Note 8] [18]

Family Emballonuridae[edit]

With 51 species (2005),[3] Emballonuridae are a moderately diverse family. Found in tropical and subtropical regions across the world, they are characterized by a tail that extends beyond the uropatagium (tail membrane), but may be retracted into a sheath. Four species are known from Madagascar, of which two are endemic and two others are shared with mainland Africa.[19]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Coleura afra 1852, Peters Ankarana, N Madagascar; Sub-Saharan Africa; Yemen 45 to 55 mm (1.8 to 2.2 in) Least Concern [20]
Emballonura atrata 1836, Eydoux and Gervais E Madagascar only c. 37 to 40 mm (1.5 to 1.6 in) Least Concern [21]
Emballonura tiavato 2006, Goodman et al. N and W Madagascar only 35 to 41 mm (1.4 to 1.6 in) Least Concern [22]
Taphozous mauritianus 1818, E. Geoffroy Madagascar and other W Indian Ocean islands; Sub-Saharan Africa 58 to 64 mm (2.3 to 2.5 in) Least Concern [23]

Family Nycteridae[edit]

Nycteridae is a small family of 16 species (2005)[3] in a single genus found in Africa and east to the Sunda Islands. They are characterized by a groove on their face and are insectivorous. A single, poorly known species has been recorded from Madagascar.[24]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Nycteris madagascariensis[Note 9] 1937, G. Grandidier N Madagascar only 50 to 52 mm (about 2.0 in) Data Deficient [26]

Family Myzopodidae[edit]

This family, characterized by suction disks on the hand and feet, is unique to Madagascar. (It does, however, have a fossil record in Africa extending from the late Eocene to the Pleistocene.[27]) A single species has historically been recognized, but eastern and western populations were classified as separate species in 2007.[28]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Myzopoda aurita 1878, Milne-Edwards and Grandidier E Madagascar only 46 to 49 mm (1.8 to 1.9 in) Least Concern [29]
Myzopoda schliemanni 2007, Goodman et al. W Madagascar only 45 to 49 mm (1.8 to 1.9 in) Least Concern [30]

Family Molossidae[edit]

This diverse family of 100 species (2005)[3] occurs across the world in tropical regions. The tail conspicuously projects from the uropatagium and the wings are long. Eight species are known from Madagascar, four of which are endemic.[31]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Chaerephon atsinanana[Note 10] 2010, Goodman et al. E Madagascar 37 to 42 mm (1.5 to 1.7 in) [33]
Chaerephon jobimena 2004, Goodman and Cardiff Madagascar only 45 to 48 mm (1.8 to 1.9 in) Least Concern[Note 11] [34]
Chaerephon leucogaster 1870, A. Grandidier W Madagascar; Sub-Saharan Africa; Mayotte 33 to 38 mm (1.3 to 1.5 in) Not evaluated[Note 12] [36]
Mops leucostigma 1918, G.M. Allen Madagascar only 42 to 45 mm (1.7 to 1.8 in) Least Concern[Note 13] [37]
Mops midas 1843, Sundevall Madagascar; Sub-Saharan Africa; Saudi Arabia 62 to 63 mm (2.4 to 2.5 in) Least Concern[Note 14] [38]
Mormopterus jugularis 1865, Peters Madagascar only 37 to 40 mm (1.5 to 1.6 in) Least Concern [39]
Otomops madagascariensis[Note 15] 1953, Dorst Madagascar only 59 to 65 mm (2.3 to 2.6 in) Least Concern [41]
Tadarida fulminans 1903, Thomas Madagascar; Sub-Saharan Africa north to Kenya 57 to 60 mm (2.2 to 2.4 in) Least Concern [42]

Family Miniopteridae[edit]

This family contains a single genus, Miniopterus, with 19 species recognized in 2005,[43] which was classified in Vespertilionidae until recently.[44] Insectivorous and characterized by long fingers, the species are all quite similar, leading to a confused classification. On Madagascar, four species were recognized as recently as 2007, but systematic research has led the number to increase to eleven, of which nine are restricted to Madagascar and two shared with the Comoros.[45]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Miniopterus aelleni 2009, Goodman et al. N and W Madagascar; Anjouan, Comoros 35 to 41 mm (1.4 to 1.6 in) Not evaluated [46]
Miniopterus brachytragos 2009, Goodman et al. N and W Madagascar only 35 to 38 mm (1.4 to 1.5 in) Not evaluated [47]
Miniopterus egeri 2011, Goodman et al. E Madagascar only 37 to 40 mm (1.5 to 1.6 in) Not evaluated [48]
Miniopterus gleni 1995, Peterson et al. Madagascar only, except S 47 to 50 mm (1.9 to 2.0 in) Least Concern [49]
Miniopterus griffithsi 2009, Goodman et al. S Madagascar only 48 to 50 mm (1.9 to 2.0 in) Not evaluated [50]
Miniopterus griveaudi 1959, Harrison N and W Madagascar; Comoros 35 to 38 mm (1.4 to 1.5 in) Data Deficient [51]
Miniopterus mahafaliensis 2009, Goodman et al. S Madagascar only 35 to 40 mm (1.4 to 1.6 in) Not evaluated [52]
Miniopterus majori 1906, Thomas Madagascar only[Note 16] 43 to 47 mm (1.7 to 1.9 in) Least Concern [54]
Miniopterus manavi 1906, Thomas Central Highlands, Madagascar only 38 to 39 mm (1.5 to 1.5 in) Least Concern [55]
Miniopterus petersoni 2008, Goodman et al. SE Madagascar only 38 to 43 mm (1.5 to 1.7 in) Data Deficient [56]
Miniopterus sororculus 2007, Goodman et al. Central Highlands, Madagascar only 42 to 45 mm (1.7 to 1.8 in) Least Concern [57]

Family Vespertilionidae[edit]

With 407 species (2005; including Miniopterus, which is now classified in its own family), Vespertilionidae is the largest bat family.[3] Characterized by a tail contained in the uropatagium, they occur around the world in many habitats and are insectivorous.[58] Madagascar hosts an endemic species of the extremely widespread genus Myotis, four species (three endemic) of the house bat Scotophilus, and at least six (four endemic) of small vespertilionids ("pipistrelles") in the genera Hypsugo, Eptesicus, Neoromicia, and Pipistrellus.[59] The classification of the "pipistrelles" is confused, leading to many changing identifications.[60] In addition to the six "pipistrelles" listed here, the African Neoromicia nanus has also been recorded from Madagascar, but the identification of the Madagascar records needs to be confirmed.[61]

Scientific name Classified Distribution Forearm Conservation status References
Hypsugo anchietae[Note 17] 1900, Seabra SW Madagascar; southern Africa 28 to 31 mm (1.1 to 1.2 in) Least Concern[Note 18] [62]
Myotis goudoti 1834, A. Smith Madagascar only 32 to 41 mm (1.3 to 1.6 in) Least Concern [63]
Neoromicia malagasyensis[Note 19] 1995, Peterson et al. Isalo, SC Madagascar only 30 to 32 mm (1.2 to 1.3 in) Endangered[Note 20] [64]
Neoromicia matroka[Note 21] 1905, Thomas and Schwann E Madagascar only 31 to 33 mm (1.2 to 1.3 in) Least Concern[Note 22] [65]
Neoromicia robertsi[Note 23] 2012, Goodman et al. E Madagascar only 34 to 38 mm (1.3 to 1.5 in) Not evaluated [66]
Pipistrellus hesperidus[Note 24] 1840, Temminck W Madagascar; Sub-Saharan Africa 29 to 31 mm (1.1 to 1.2 in) Least Concern [67]
Pipistrellus raceyi 2006, Bates et al. W and E Madagascar only 28 to 31 mm (1.1 to 1.2 in) Least Concern [68]
Scotophilus cf. borbonicus[Note 25] 1803, E. Geoffroy Sarodrano, SW Madagascar; Réunion 51 to 52 mm (about 2.0 in) Data Deficient [69]
Scotophilus marovaza 2006, Goodman et al. W Madagascar only 41 to 45 mm (1.6 to 1.8 in) Least Concern [70]
Scotophilus robustus 1881, Milne-Edwards Madagascar only 62 to 65 mm (2.4 to 2.6 in) Least Concern [71]
Scotophilus tandrefana 2005, Goodman et al. W Madagascar only 44 to 47 mm (1.7 to 1.9 in) Data Deficient [72]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sometimes included in the mainland African species Eidolon helvum.[5]
  2. ^ Sometimes included in the mainland African species Rousettus lanosus.[8]
  3. ^ a b Not in IUCN Red List.
  4. ^ a b Previously placed in the genus Triaenops as Triaenops auritus and Triaenops furculus, but now classified in Paratriaenops.[13]
  5. ^ As Triaenops auritus.
  6. ^ As Triaenops furculus.
  7. ^ Populations now included in this species have previously also been included in Triaenops persicus, which is now restricted to the Middle East, but are more conventionally known as Triaenops rufus. This name is, however, in fact a synonym of T. persicus; therefore, the new name menamena was introduced for the Madagascan populations in 2009.[17]
  8. ^ As Triaenops rufus.
  9. ^ Sometimes included in the mainland African species Nycteris macrotis.[25]
  10. ^ Previously included in the mainland African Chaerephon pumilus (or Tadarida pumila).[32]
  11. ^ As Tadarida jobimena.
  12. ^ Included in Tadarida pumila.[35]
  13. ^ As Tadarida leucostigma.
  14. ^ As Tadarida midas.
  15. ^ Previously included in the mainland African Otomops martiensseni.[40]
  16. ^ Although often cited for the Comoros, its occurrence there is questionable.[53]
  17. ^ Previously placed in the genus Pipistrellus as Pipistrellus anchietae.
  18. ^ As Pipistrellus anchietae.
  19. ^ Previously included in Eptesicus, as Eptesicus malagasyensis and/or considered a subspecies of Neoromicia somalicus (=Eptesicus somalicus) from mainland Africa.
  20. ^ As Eptesicus malagasyensis.
  21. ^ Previously included in Eptesicus or Pipistrellus and/or considered a subspecies of Neoromicia capensis (=Eptesicus capensis; Pipistrellus capensis).
  22. ^ As Eptesicus matroka.
  23. ^ Specimens identified as this species were previously called Neoromicia melckorum, and they have also been included in the genus Eptesicus or Pipistrellus.
  24. ^ Previously included in the European species Pipistrellus kuhlii.
  25. ^ It is uncertain whether the single known specimen from Madagascar belongs to this species, otherwise known from Réunion by a single specimen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Garbutt, 2007, p. 59
  2. ^ Bates et al., 2006, p. 321
  3. ^ a b c d e f Wilson and Reeder, 2005, p. xxix
  4. ^ Nowak, 1994, pp. 48–49; Garbutt, 2007, p. 59
  5. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 321
  6. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 321; Garbutt, 2007, p. 62; Andriafidison et al., 2008a
  7. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 343; Garbutt, 2007, p. 60; Andriafidison et al., 2008b
  8. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 348
  9. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 348; Garbutt, 2007, p. 64; Andriafidison et al., 2008c
  10. ^ Nowak, 1994, p. 110; Garbutt, 2007, pp. 68–69; Samonds, 2007; Benda and Vallo, 2009
  11. ^ Samonds, 2007, pp. 49ff., 62
  12. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 369; Garbutt, 2007, p. 69; Andriafidison et al., 2008f
  13. ^ Benda and Vallo, 2009, p. 34
  14. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 378; Ranivo and Goodman, 2007, p. 964, appendix 2; Benda and Vallo, 2009, p. 34; Andriafidison et al., 2008o
  15. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 378; Ranivo and Goodman, 2007, p. 964, appendix 2; Benda and Vallo, 2009, p. 34; Andriafidison et al., 2008p
  16. ^ Samonds, 2007, pp. 46ff., 62
  17. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 379; Goodman and Ranivo, 2009, p. 54; Benda and Vallo, 2009, p. 34
  18. ^ Ranivo and Goodman, 2007, appendix 3; Goodman and Ranivo, 2009, p. 54; Benda and Vallo, 2009, p. 34; Andriafidison et al., 2008q
  19. ^ Walker, 1994, pp. 87–88; Garbutt, 2007, p. 64
  20. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 386; Garbutt, 2007, p. 66; Goodman et al., 2008a; Mickleburgh et al., 2008c
  21. ^ Goodman et al., 2006a; Garbutt, 2007, p. 65; Jenkins et al., 2008a
  22. ^ Goodman et al., 2006a; Garbutt, 2007, p. 66; Jenkins et al., 2008b
  23. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 384; Garbutt, 2007, p. 67; Hutson et al., 2008c
  24. ^ Walker, 1994, pp. 101–102; Garbutt, 2007, p. 68
  25. ^ Simmons, 2005, pp. 392–393
  26. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 393; Garbutt, 2007, p. 68; Hutson et al., 2008a
  27. ^ Gunnell, G. F.; Simmons, N. B.; Seiffert, E. R. (2014-02-04). "New Myzopodidae (Chiroptera) from the Late Paleogene of Egypt: Emended Family Diagnosis and Biogeographic Origins of Noctilionoidea". PLoS ONE 9 (2): e86712. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086712. Retrieved 2014-02-05.  edit
  28. ^ Garbutt, 2007, p. 72; Goodman et al., 2007
  29. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 394; Garbutt, 2007, p. 72; Goodman et al., 2007; Jenkins et al., 2008c
  30. ^ Garbutt, 2007, p. 73; Goodman et al., 2007; Jenkins et al., 2008d
  31. ^ Garbutt, 2007, pp. 80–84
  32. ^ Mickleburgh et al., 2008; Goodman et al., 2010c, pp. 1–2
  33. ^ Goodman et al., 2010c, pp. 1–2, table 2
  34. ^ Goodman and Cardiff, 2004, table 1; Garbutt, 2007, p. 82; Andriafidison et al., 2008m
  35. ^ Mickleburgh et al., 2008b
  36. ^ Goodman and Cardiff, 2004, p. 227; Simmons, 2005, p. 434; Mickleburgh et al., 2008b; Ratrimomanarivo et al., 2009, table 1; Goodman et al., 2010b, p. 128
  37. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 442; Garbutt, 2007, p. 83; Andriafidison et al., 2008n
  38. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 442; Garbutt, 2007, p. 83; Jenkins et al., 2008e
  39. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 445; Garbutt, 2007, p. 80; Andriafidison et al., 2008j
  40. ^ Andriafidison et al., 2008k
  41. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 447; Garbutt, 2007, p. 84; Andriafidison et al., 2008k
  42. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 450; Garbutt, 2007, p. 81 Cotterill et al., 2008
  43. ^ Simmons, 2005, pp. 519–522
  44. ^ Miller-Butterworth et al., 2007, p. 1553
  45. ^ Garbutt, 2007, pp. 77–80; subsequent revisions cited below
  46. ^ Goodman et al., 2009, p. 6, table 3
  47. ^ Goodman et al., 2009, fig. 1, table 3
  48. ^ Goodman et al., 2011, p. 1, table 5
  49. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 519; Andriafidison et al., 2008g; Goodman et al., 2010a, fig. 1, table 1
  50. ^ Goodman et al., 2010a, fig. 1, table 1
  51. ^ Juste, 2008; Goodman et al., 2009, p. 5, table 3
  52. ^ Goodman et al., 2009, fig. 1, table 3
  53. ^ Goodman et al., 2010b, p. 132
  54. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 520; Jenkins and Rakotoarivelo, 2008a; Goodman et al., 2010b, p. 132
  55. ^ Goodman et al., 2009, p. 5, table 3; Andriafidison et al., 2008h
  56. ^ Goodman et al., 2008b, fig. 1, table 1; 2009, p. 5; Jenkins and Rakotoarivelo, 2008b
  57. ^ Goodman et al., 2008b, fig. 1, table 1; Jenkins et al., 2008f
  58. ^ Garbutt, 2007, p. 73
  59. ^ Garbutt, 2007, pp. 73–77; Bates et al., 2006, p. 299
  60. ^ Bates et al., 2006, pp. 299–300
  61. ^ Bates et al., 2006, p. 320; Hutson et al., 2008b
  62. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 489; Bates et al., 2006, table 1, fig. 7, p. 319; Jacobs et al., 2008
  63. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 508; Garbutt, 2007, p. 74; Andriafidison et al., 2008i
  64. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 495; Bates et al., 2006, table 1, pp. 313, 315; Andriafidison et al., 2008d
  65. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 456; Bates et al., 2006, table 1, fig. 7, pp. 312–313; Andriafidison et al., 2008e
  66. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 494; Bates et al., 2006, table 1, fig. 7, pp. 315–316; Goodman et al., 2012
  67. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 474; Bates et al., 2006, table 1, fig. 7, pp. 317–318; Mickleburgh et al., 2008a
  68. ^ Bates et al., 2006, table 1, fig. 7; Jenkins et al., 2008g
  69. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 465; Goodman et al., 2005, table 1, pp. 871–873; Garbutt, 2007, p. 76; Andriafidison et al., 2008k
  70. ^ Goodman et al., 2006b, p. 21, table 1; Jenkins et al., 2008h
  71. ^ Simmons, 2005, p. 467; Goodman et al., 2005, table 1, pp. 873–875; Garbutt, 2007, p. 76; Andriafidison et al., 2008l
  72. ^ Goodman et al., 2005, table 1, p. 875; Garbutt, 2007, p. 76; Jenkins et al., 2008i

Literature cited[edit]

General[edit]

Pteropodidae[edit]

  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008a. Eidolon dupreanum. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 26, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D, Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Rabearivelo, A., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008b. Pteropus rufus. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 26, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008c. Rousettus madagascariensis. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 26, 2010.

Hipposideridae[edit]

Emballonuridae[edit]

Nycteridae[edit]

Myzopodidae[edit]

Molossidae[edit]

Miniopteridae[edit]

Vespertilionidae[edit]

  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008d. Eptesicus malagasyensis. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008e. Eptesicus matroka. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008i. Myotis goudoti. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D, Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008k. Scotophilus borbonicus. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
  • Andriafidison, D., Cardiff, S.G., Goodman, S.M., Hutson, A.M., Jenkins, R.K.B., Kofoky, A.F., Racey, P.A., Ranivo, J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Razafimanahaka, H.J. 2008l. Scotophilus robustus. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
  • Bates, P.J.J., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H., Harrison, D.L. and Goodman, S.M. 2006. A description of a new species of Pipistrellus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Madagascar with a review of related Vespertilioninae from the island. Acta Chiropterologica 8(2):299–324.
  • Goodman S.M., Jenkins R.K.B. and Ratrimomanarivo F.H. 2005. A review of the genus Scotophilus (Mammalia, Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) on Madagascar, with the description of a new species. Zoosystema 27(4):867–882.
  • Goodman, S.M., Ratrimomanarivo, F.H. and Randrianandrianina, F.H. 2006b. A new species of Scotophilus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from western Madagascar. Acta Chiropterologica 8(1):21–37.
  • Goodman, S.M., Taylor, P.J., Ratrimomanarivo, F. and Hoofer, S.R. 2012. The genus Neoromicia (family Vespertilionidae) in Madagascar, with the description of a new species (subscription required). Zootaxa 3250:1–25.
  • Hutson, A.M., Racey, P.A., Goodman, S. and Jacobs, D. 2008b. Pipistrellus nanus. In IUCN. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on May 27, 2010.
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