List of million-selling game consoles

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Sony's PlayStation 2 is currently the best-selling home console with over 155 million units worldwide.[1]

A video game console is a boxlike standardized computing device tailored for video gaming that requires a monitor or television set as an output.[2] Handheld controllers are commonly used as input devices. Video game consoles may use one or more storage mediums like hard disk drives, optical discs, and memory cards for content. They weigh between 2 and 9 pounds on average and their compact size allows them to be easily used in a variety of locations with an electrical outlet.[3] Each are usually developed by a single business organization.[2] Dedicated consoles can only play built-in games.[4] Gaming consoles in general are also described as "dedicated" in distinction from the more versatile personal computer and other consumer electronics.[5][6][7]

A handheld game console is a lightweight device with a built-in screen, games controls, speakers,[8] and has greater portability than a standard video game console.[3] It is capable of playing multiple games unlike tabletop and handheld electronic game devices. Tabletop and handheld electronic game devices of the 1970s and 1980s are the precursors of handheld game consoles.[9] Mattel introduced the first handheld electronic game with the 1977 release of Auto Race.[10] Later, several companies—including Coleco and Milton Bradley—made their own single-game, lightweight tabletop or handheld electronic game devices.[11] The oldest handheld game console with interchangeable cartridges is the Milton Bradley Microvision in 1979.[12] Nintendo is credited with popularizing the handheld console concept with the Game Boy's release in 1989[9] and continues to dominate the handheld console market.[13][14]

Game consoles[edit]

The following tables contain video game consoles and handheld game consoles that have sold at least 1 million units worldwide either through to consumers or inside retail channels. Dedicated consoles are marked with an asterisk (*) next to the platform's name, while current generation consoles are marked with a cross (†). The years correspond to when the video game console or handheld game console was first released. Each year links to the corresponding "year in video gaming". Manufacturers with a brown, green, red, blue, or violet background and the name Atari, Microsoft, Nintendo, Sega, or Sony, respectively have more than two consoles listed; those with a white background do not.

  Atari    Microsoft    Nintendo    Sega    Sony    Other 

The Nintendo DS product line are the best-selling handheld consoles, selling 153.98 million units worldwide. The original (left) sold 18.79 million units. The majority of sales came from the DS Lite (right) at 93.86 million units.[15]
The last two members of the DS product line, the DSi (left) and DSi XL (right) helped to further drive sales, moving 41.33 million units combined.[15]
Platform Manufacturer Released Units sold Ref.
PlayStation 2 Sony 2000 >155 million [i]
Nintendo DS Nintendo 2004 153.98 million [15]
Game Boy (includes color model) Nintendo 1989 118.69 million [ii]
PlayStation Sony 1994 102.49 million [25]
Wii Nintendo 2006 100.90 million [15]
Xbox 360 Microsoft 2005 82.9 million [iii]
Game Boy Advance Nintendo 2001 81.51 million [15]
PlayStation 3 Sony 2006 >80 million [i]
PlayStation Portable Sony 2004 >80 million [i]
Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1983 61.91 million [15]
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1990 49.10 million [15]
Nintendo 3DS Nintendo 2011 42.74 million [15]
Sega Genesis Sega 1988 40 million [iv]
Nintendo 64 Nintendo 1996 32.93 million [15]
Atari 2600 Atari 1977 30 million [v]
Xbox Microsoft 2001 24 million [47]
GameCube Nintendo 2001 21.74 million [15]
Master System Sega 1986 13–14.8 million [vi]
Sega Game Gear Sega 1990 11 million [53]
Dreamcast Sega 1998 10.6 million [54]
TurboGrafx-16 NEC 1987 10 million [55]
Sega Saturn Sega 1994 9.5 million [54]
PlayStation 4 Sony 2013 6 million [56]
Wii U Nintendo 2012 5.86 million [15]
PlayStation Vita Sony 2011 >4 million [i]
Atari 7800 Atari 1986 >3.77 million [vii]
Xbox One Microsoft 2013 3–3.9 million [iii]
WonderSwan (includes color model) Bandai 1999 3.2–3.5 million [viii]
Color TV Game *[64] Nintendo 1977 3 million [65]
Intellivision Mattel 1980 3 million [66]
N-Gage Nokia 2003 3 million [53]
ColecoVision Coleco 1982 >2 million [ix]
3DO Interactive Multiplayer Panasonic 1993 2 million [70]
Magnavox Odyssey² Magnavox/Philips 1978 2 million [71]
Neo Geo Pocket (includes color model) SNK 1998 2 million [53]
TurboExpress NEC 1990 1.5 million [53]
Atari Lynx Atari 1989 >1 million [x]
Atari 5200 Atari 1982 1 million [74]
Sega Nomad Sega 1995 1 million [75]
Telstar *[64] Coleco 1976 1 million [76]

Home game consoles[edit]

Only the PlayStation (top) and Wii (bottom) join the PlayStation 2 in home consoles surpassing 100 million units sold.
Platform Manufacturer Released Units sold Ref.
PlayStation 2 Sony 2000 >155 million [i]
PlayStation Sony 1994 102.49 million [25]
Wii Nintendo 2006 100.90 million [15]
Xbox 360 Microsoft 2005 82.9 million [iii]
PlayStation 3 Sony 2006 >80 million [i]
Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1983 61.91 million [15]
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1990 49.10 million [15]
Sega Genesis Sega 1988 40 million [iv]
Nintendo 64 Nintendo 1996 32.93 million [15]
Atari 2600 Atari 1977 30 million [v]
Xbox Microsoft 2001 24 million [47]
GameCube Nintendo 2001 21.74 million [15]
Master System Sega 1986 13–14.8 million [vi]
Dreamcast Sega 1998 10.6 million [54]
TurboGrafx-16 NEC 1987 10 million [55]
Sega Saturn Sega 1994 9.5 million [54]
PlayStation 4 Sony 2013 6 million [56]
Wii U Nintendo 2012 5.86 million [15]
Atari 7800 Atari 1986 >3.77 million [vii]
Xbox One Microsoft 2013 3–3.9 million [iii]
Color TV Game *[64] Nintendo 1977 3 million [65]
Intellivision Mattel 1980 3 million [66]
ColecoVision Coleco 1982 >2 million [ix]
3DO Interactive Multiplayer Panasonic 1993 2 million [70]
Magnavox Odyssey² Magnavox/Philips 1978 2 million [71]
Atari 5200 Atari 1982 1 million [74]
Telstar *[64] Coleco 1976 1 million [76]

Handheld game consoles[edit]

Sony's PlayStation Portable signified the company's debut in the handheld market. Forbes editor Penelope Patsuris noted "The competition marks the first time that a company with real clout has challenged the lock that Nintendo has had on handheld gaming for 15 years."[13]
Platform Manufacturer Released Units sold Ref.
Nintendo DS Nintendo 2004 153.98 million [15]
Game Boy (includes color model) Nintendo 1989 118.69 million [ii]
Game Boy Advance Nintendo 2001 81.51 million [15]
PlayStation Portable Sony 2004 >80 million [i]
Nintendo 3DS Nintendo 2011 42.74 million [15]
Sega Game Gear Sega 1990 11 million [53]
PlayStation Vita Sony 2011 >4 million [i]
WonderSwan (includes color model) Bandai 1999 3.2–3.5 million [viii]
N-Gage Nokia 2003 3 million [53]
Neo Geo Pocket (includes color model) SNK 1998 2 million [53]
TurboExpress NEC 1990 1.5 million [53]
Atari Lynx Atari 1989 >1 million [x]
Sega Nomad Sega 1995 1 million [75]

Million-selling game consoles by manufacturer[edit]

Total amount of every console with at least 1 million units sold.

Manufacturer Home
console sales
Handheld
console sales
Total sales
Nintendo 275.44 million 396.92 million 672.36 million
Sony >343.49 million >84 million >427.49 million
Microsoft 109.9–110.8 million 109.9–110.8 million
Sega 73.1–74.9 million 12 million 85.1–86.9 million
Atari >34.77 million >1 million >34.77 million
NEC 10 million 1.5 million 11.5 million
Bandai 3.2–3.5 million 3.2–3.5 million
Coleco >3 million >3 million
Mattel 3 million 3 million
Nokia 3 million 3 million
SNK 2 million 2 million
Magnavox/Philips 2 million 2 million
Panasonic 2 million 2 million

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h As of 2012, Sony stopped divulging individual platform sales in their fiscal reports.[16] PlayStation 2: 138.8 million units sold as of Sony's fiscal quarter ending June 2009 (Q1 FY2009).[17] Sony sold 16.2 million units from the second 2009 fiscal quarter (Q2 FY2009) until March 31, 2012.[18] It was discontinued worldwide on January 4, 2013.[19] PlayStation 3: A Sony press release reported 80 million sold as of November 2, 2013.[20] PlayStation Portable: 52.9 million units sold as of Sony's fiscal quarter ending June 2009 (Q1 FY2009).[17] Sony sold 23.4 million units from the second 2009 fiscal quarter (Q2 FY2009) until March 31, 2012.[21] A November 27, 2013 article by Metro gives a rounded sales figure of 80 million.[22] PlayStation Vita: 4 million reported by The Guardian on January 4, 2013.[19]
  2. ^ a b Nintendo only provided a combined sales total.[23] Before Game Boy Color's release in late-1998,[24] previous models sold 64.42 million units combined worldwide.[15]
  3. ^ a b c d Microsoft report figures sold inside retail channels. Xbox 360: 78.2 million sold by the end of Microsoft's 2013 fiscal year (June 2013).[26] By the next two fiscal quarters ending September 2013 and December 2013, Microsoft sold 1.2 million[27] and 3.5 million units respectively.[28] Xbox One: By December 2013, 3.9 million shipped to retailers,[28] but 3 million sold to customers.[29]
  4. ^ a b Sega sold approximately 40 million units worldwide.[30][31] According to Man!ac magazine, the Sega Genesis sold 29 million units with 14 million of those in North America by the end of 1994.[32] Famitsu reported 3.58 million in Japan and 25 million for the United States and Europe by the end of March 1996.[33] A November 1996 article reported 8 million sold in Europe.[34] The 29 million figure was later published by other sources, including IGN and Wired.[35][36] However, Sega continued to sell the Genesis worldwide through 1997.[37][38] Reports of the Genesis reaching 20 million units sold in the United States started as early as 1998.[39][40][41] Different console variations, including those by Tectoy, were later sold.[42][43]
  5. ^ a b 30 million according to Atari Flashback developer AtGames and IGN's Levi Buchanan.[44][45] Roberto Dillon's 2011 The Golden Age of Video Games: The Birth of a Multibillion Dollar Industry stated approximately 20 to 22 million units sold worldwide by the time it was discontinued (January 1, 1992), but exact figures are unknown since Atari never released them. Dillon suggested the 30 million figure is likely to include sales of the 5200, 7800, and XEGS.[46]
  6. ^ a b 13 million according to a 2009 article by IGN's Levi Buchanan[35] and Roberto Dillon's 2011 The Golden Age of Video Games: The Birth of a Multibillion Dollar Industry.[48] Screen Digest wrote in a 1995 publication that the Master System's active installed user base in Western Europe peaked at 6.25 million in 1993. Those countries that peaked are France at 1.6 million, Germany at 700 thousand, the Netherlands at 200 thousand, Spain at 550 thousand, the United Kingdom at 1.35 million, and other Western European countries at 1.4 million. However, Belgium peaked in 1991 with 600 thousand, and Italy in 1992 with 400 thousand. Thus it is estimated approximately 6.8 million units were purchased in this part of Europe.[49] 1 million were sold in Japan as of 1986.[50] 2 million were sold in the United States.[51] 5 million were sold by Tectoy in Brazil as of 2012.[52]
  7. ^ a b United States sales only.[57] It was released in Europe the following year.[58]
  8. ^ a b Bandai released three WonderSwan iterations.[59] A March 2003 Famitsu article reported the original (March 1999)[60] and color (December 2000)[60] versions sold approximately 3 million units combined,[61] while the SwanCrystal (July 2002)[59] sold over 200 thousand units.[61] Bandai announced the transition from hardware to third-party development in February 2003 due to declining sales and will supply software to the competitor's Game Boy Advance by March 2004.[62] Average weekly sales during the transition were only a couple hundred units,[§] and the SwanCrystal went build to order starting in autumn 2003.[61] WonderSwan hardware designer Koto claimed over 3.5 million were sold.[63]
  9. ^ a b The ColecoVision reached 2 million units sold by the spring of 1984. Console quarterly sales dramatically decreased at this time, but it continued to sell modestly[67][68] with most inventory gone by October 1985.[69]
  10. ^ a b The Wall Street Journal reported in November 1992 approximately 1 million were sold.[72] Around June 1994, Atari shifted its focus from the Lynx to its Jaguar console.[73]

References[edit]

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  12. ^ a b Patsuris, Penelope (June 7, 2004). "Sony PSP Vs. Nintendo DS". Forbes. Retrieved November 4, 2013. 
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  27. ^ a b "Earnings Release FY14 Q2". Microsoft. January 23, 2014. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
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  29. ^ Retro Gamer staff (2013). "Sonic Boom: The Success Story of Sonic the Hedgehog". The Mega Drive/SNES Book (Imagine Publishing): 31. ASIN B00FRKX2F8. "The game and its star became synonymous with Sega and helped propel the Mega Drive to sales of around 40 million, only 9 million short of the SNES—a minuscule gap compared to the 47 million that separated the Master System and NES." 
  30. ^ Horowitz, Ken (February 7, 2013). "Interview: Joe Miller". Sega-16. Retrieved November 17, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Videospiel-Algebra". Man!ac Magazine (in German). May 1995. 
  32. ^ "Yearly market report". Famitsu Weekly (in Japanese) 306: ~4. June 21, 1996. 
  33. ^ Lomas, Ed (November 1996). "News: Over 1 Million Saturns In Europe By March!". Computer and Video Games (180): 10. ISSN 0261-3697. ""But that doesn't distract us from our mission to convert our MegaDrive owners into Saturn owners." Which by their figures, adds up to 8 million potential Saturn upgraders!" 
  34. ^ a b Buchanan, Levi (March 20, 2009). "Genesis vs. SNES: By the Numbers". IGN. Retrieved October 31, 2013. "Nintendo moved 49.1 million Super NES consoles over the course of the generation and beyond, far surpassing the Genesis, which sold a still impressive 29 million units. [...] The Master System sold an anemic 13 million to the NES count of 62 million." 
  35. ^ Orlando, Greg (May 15, 2007). "Console Portraits: A 40-Year Pictorial History of Gaming". Wired. p. 21. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Sega tops holiday, yearly sales projections; Sega Saturn installed base reaches 1.6 million in U.S., 7 million worldwide". Business Wire. January 13, 1997. Retrieved October 13, 2013. "Sega hit its projections on the mark, selling 1.1 million hardware units and 3 million Sega Genesis games. While the company recently announced it will dispose of all remaining 16-bit peripheral inventory, specifically the Genesis 32X and Sega CD products, it will continue to sell Genesis hardware and software in the coming years." 
  37. ^ "Sega farms out Genesis". Consumer Electronics. March 2, 1998. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 9, 2012. 
  38. ^ Strom, Stephanie (March 14, 1998). "Sega Enterprises Pulls Its Saturn Video Console From the U.S. Market". The New York Times. p. D2. Retrieved January 13, 2014. "After the company sold some 20 million 16-bit Genesis consoles in the United States alone [...]" 
  39. ^ Snider, Mike (September 8, 1999). "Sega shoots to be a player again Dreamcast gets jump to regain market". USA Today. p. 4D. "Its 16-bit Genesis hit the market before the Super Nintendo; both systems eventually sold about 20 million units." 
  40. ^ "Sega pulls back from consoles". Electronics Times: 14. March 23, 1998. ISSN 0142-3118. "The Saturn only managed to sell two million units in the US compared with 20 million units of the Genesis 16bit version in the early 1990s." 
  41. ^ "Cartridge Console With 15 Sega Megadrive Games". Blaze Europe. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 
  42. ^ "Mega Drive Guitar Idol - 87 jogos" (in Portuguese). Tectoy. Archived from the original on August 26, 2009. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 
  43. ^ "AtGames to Launch Atari Flashback 4 to Celebrate Atari's 40th Anniversary!" (Press release). PR Newswire. November 12, 2012. Archived from the original on November 27, 2012. Retrieved April 11, 2014. 
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  46. ^ a b "Gamers Catch Their Breath as Xbox 360 and Xbox Live Reinvent Next-Generation Gaming". Xbox.com. May 10, 2006. Archived from the original on July 9, 2007. Retrieved September 5, 2007. 
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  48. ^ "Sega Consoles: Active installed base estimates". Screen Digest. Screen Digest. March 1995. p. 60.  (cf. here [1], here [2], and here [3])
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  73. ^ a b Schrage, Michael (May 22, 1984). "Atari Introduces Game In Attempt for Survival". The Washington Post: C3. Retrieved July 29, 2009. (subscription required (help)). "The company has stopped producing its 5200 SuperSystem games player, more than 1 million of which were sold." 
  74. ^ a b Snow, Blake (July 30, 2007). "The 10 Worst-Selling Handhelds of All Time". GamePro. p. 2. Archived from the original on October 31, 2007. Retrieved July 5, 2008. 
  75. ^ a b Herman, Leonard (1997). Phoenix: The Fall & Rise of Videogames (2nd ed.). Rolenta Press. p. 20. ISBN 9780964384828. Retrieved February 16, 2012. "Like Pong, Telstar could only play video tennis but it retailed at an inexpensive $50 that made it attractive to most families that were on a budget. Coleco managed to sell over a million units that year." 
§ WonderSwan Famitsu sources