List of birds

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Neornithes 
 Paleognathae 

Struthioniformes




Rheiformes



Tinamiformes




Casuariiformes



Apterygiformes





 Neognathae 

Neoaves


 Galloanserae 

Anseriformes



Galliformes





Neoaves 
 Mirandornithes 

Podicipediformes



Phoenicopteriformes




Phaethontiformes



Pteroclidiformes



Mesitornithiformes



Columbiformes



Eurypygiformes


 Cypselomorphae 

Caprimulgiformes




Apodiformes



Aegotheliformes





Opisthocomiformes




Gruiformes



Cuculiformes



Musophagiformes



Aequornithes





Charadriiformes



"Higher Landbirds"




Aequornithes 

Gaviiformes





Sphenisciformes



Procellariiformes





Ciconiiformes




Suliformes



Pelecaniformes






"Higher Landbirds

Accipitriformes



Strigiformes



Coliiformes




Leptosomatiformes



Trogoniformes


 Picocoraciae 

Bucerotiformes




Coraciiformes



Piciformes






Cariamiformes


 Eufalconimorphae 

Falconiformes


 Psittacopasserae 

Psittaciformes



Passeriformes





A phylogenetic tree of the modern bird orders, based on recent studies.[1][2][3] Note the polytomies.
This is a list relating to extant species of birds. For a list of birds in history and fiction, see List of historical and fictional birds. For extinct birds, please see List of extinct birds, Prehistoric birds and Fossil birds.

This page lists living orders and families of birds. The links below should then lead to family accounts and hence to individual species.

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. In particular see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for a very different classification.

Paleognathae[edit]

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae or "old jaws", one of the two evolutionary superorders.

Struthioniformes[edit]

Africa and Australasia; 2 species.

Rheiformes[edit]

South America; 2 species.

Tinamiformes[edit]

South America; 45 species.

Casuariiformes[edit]

Australasia; 4 species.

Apterygiformes[edit]

Australasia; 5 species.

Neognathae[edit]

Nearly all living birds belong to the superorder of Neognathae or "new jaws". With their keels, unlike the ratites, they are known as carinatae. The passerines alone account for well over 5000 species.totally there are almost 8640 species of birds worldwide

Anseriformes[edit]

Worldwide; 150 species.

Galliformes[edit]

Worldwide; 250 species.

Podicipediformes[edit]

Worldwide; 19 species; sometimes grouped with Phoenicopteriformes.

Phoenicopteriformes[edit]

Worldwide; 6 species.

Mesitornithiformes[edit]

Madagascar, Neotropics, New Caledonia; 5 species.

Pteroclidiformes[edit]

Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species; sometimes grouped with Columbiformes.

Columbiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 300 species.

Phaethontiformes[edit]

Oceanic; 3 species.

Caprimulgiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 90 species.

Apodiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 400 species.

Aegotheliformes[edit]

Oceania; 10 species; sometimes grouped with Apodiformes.

Cuculiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 126 species.

Opisthocomiformes[edit]

South America; 1 species.

Musophagiformes[edit]

Africa; 23 species.

Gruiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 191 species.

Gaviiformes[edit]

North America, Eurasia; 5 species.

Sphenisciformes[edit]

Antarctic and southern waters; 17 species.

Procellariiformes[edit]

Pan-oceanic; 120 species.

Ciconiiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 19 species.

Pelecaniformes[edit]

Worldwide; 108 species.

Suliformes[edit]

Worldwide; 59 species.

Charadriiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 350 species

Accipitriformes[edit]

Worldwide; 200 species.

Strigiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 130 species.

Coliiformes[edit]

Sub-Saharan Africa; 6 species.

Trogoniformes[edit]

Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species.

Coraciiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 144 species.

Bucerotiformes[edit]

Old World, New Guinea; 64 species.

Leptosomatiformes[edit]

Madagascar; 1 species.

Piciformes[edit]

Worldwide except Australasia; 400 species.

Falconiformes[edit]

Worldwide; 60 species.

Cariamiformes[edit]

South America; 2 species.

Psittaciformes[edit]

Pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species.

Passeriformes[edit]

Worldwide; 5000 species.

See also[edit]

For regions smaller than continents see:

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Phylogenomic Study of Birds Reveals Their Evolutionary History. Shannon J. Hackett, et al. Science 320, 1763 (2008).
  2. ^ Metaves, Mirandornithes, Strisores and other novelties – a critical review of the higher-level phylogeny of neornithine birds. Gerald Mayr. J Zool Syst Evol Res (2010).
  3. ^ Alexander Suh et al. (2011-08-23). "Mesozoic retroposons reveal parrots as the closest living relatives of passerine birds". Nature Communications 2 (8). doi:10.1038/ncomms1448. PMC 3265382. PMID 21863010.