List of birds of Morocco

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This is a list of the bird species recorded in Morocco. The avifauna of Morocco include a total of 454 species (Bergier & Thévenot 2006), of which five have been introduced by humans and 156 are rare or accidental. Five species listed are extirpated in Morocco and are not included in the species count. Fifteen species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of the West Palearctic List Committee. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Morocco.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. Not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

  • (A) Accidental - a species that only rarely occurs in Morocco; records of these species require formal acceptance by the Commission d’Homologation Marocaine (Moroccan Rare Birds Committee)
  • (I) Introduced - a species introduced to Morocco as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions
  • (Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Morocco although populations exist elsewhere


Table of contents

See also        References        External links

Ostriches[edit]

Order: Struthioniformes   Family: Struthionidae

The ostrich is a flightless bird native to Africa. It is the largest living species of bird. It is distinctive in its appearance, with a long neck and legs and the ability to run at high speeds. It became extinct in Morocco some time before 1990 (Snow & Perrins 1998); a re-introduction programme is in progress (National Environment Observatory of Morocco 2001).

Swans, geese and ducks[edit]

Order: Anseriformes   Family: Anatidae

Anatidae includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as swans and geese.

Pheasants and partridges[edit]

Order: Galliformes   Family: Phasianidae

Phasianidae are a family of terrestrial birds which consists of quails, partridges, francolins and pheasants. In general, they are plump (although they vary in size) and have broad, relatively short wings.

Guineafowl[edit]

Order: Galliformes   Family: Numididae

Guineafowl are a group of African birds that resemble partridges, but with featherless heads and spangled grey plumage.

Divers[edit]

Order: Gaviiformes   Family: Gaviidae

Divers are a group of aquatic birds found in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere.

Grebes[edit]

Order: Podicipediformes   Family: Podicipedidae

Grebes are small to medium-large freshwater diving birds.

Albatrosses[edit]

Order: Procellariiformes   Family: Diomedeidae

The albatrosses are among the largest of flying birds, and the great albatrosses from the genus Diomedea have the largest wingspans of any extant birds.

Shearwaters and petrels[edit]

Order: Procellariiformes   Family: Procellariidae

The procellariids are the main group of medium-sized "true petrels", characterised by united nostrils with medium septum and a long outer functional primary.

Storm petrels[edit]

Order: Procellariiformes   Family: Hydrobatidae

The storm petrels are relatives of the petrels and are the smallest seabirds.

Gannets and boobies[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Sulidae

The sulids comprise the gannets and boobies. Both groups are seabirds that plunge-dive for fish.

Cormorants[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Phalacrocoracidae

Phalacrocoracidae is a family of medium to large coastal, fish-eating seabirds that includes cormorants and shags.

Darters[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Anhingidae

Darters are water birds with a distinctive long slender neck and bill.

Pelicans[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Pelecanidae

Pelicans are large water birds with a distinctive pouch under their beak.

Bitterns, herons and egrets[edit]

Order: Ciconiiformes   Family: Ardeidae

The Ardeidae family contains the bitterns, herons and egrets.

Storks[edit]

Order: Ciconiiformes   Family: Ciconiidae

Storks are large, long-legged, long-necked, wading birds with long, stout bills. Their nests can be large and may be reused for many years. Many species are migratory.

Ibises and spoonbills[edit]

Order: Ciconiiformes   Family: Threskiornithidae

Threskiornithidae is a family of large terrestrial and wading birds which includes the ibises and spoonbills.

Flamingos[edit]

Order: Phoenicopteriformes   Family: Phoenicopteridae

Flamingos are gregarious wading birds, usually 3 to 5 feet (0.9 to 1.5 m) tall, found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres.

Kites, hawks and eagles[edit]

Order: Falconiformes   Family: Accipitridae

The Accipitridae is a family of birds of prey, which includes hawks, eagles, kites, harriers and Old World vultures. The lammergeier, dark chanting goshawk and tawny eagle are all close to being extirpated in Morocco.

Osprey[edit]

Order: Falconiformes   Family: Pandionidae

The Pandionidae family contains only one species, the osprey, a medium large bird of prey with a worldwide distribution.

Falcons[edit]

Order: Falconiformes   Family: Falconidae

Falconidae is a family of diurnal birds of prey. They differ from hawks, eagles and kites in that they kill with their beaks instead of their talons.

Buttonquails[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Turnicidae

The buttonquails are small, drab, running birds which resemble the true quails. They are close to being extirpated in Morocco.

Rails, crakes, gallinules and coots[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Rallidae

Rallidae is a large family of small to medium-sized birds which includes the rails, crakes, coots and gallinules.

Cranes[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Gruidae

Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds. The demoiselle crane has been extirpated since 1985.

Bustards[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Otididae

Bustards are large terrestrial birds mainly associated with dry open country and steppes in the Old World. The Arabian bustard has been extirpated from Morocco since about 1985, and the houbara bustard is close to being extirpated.

Painted-snipe[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Rostratulidae

Painted-snipes are short-legged, long-billed birds similar in shape to the true snipes, but more brightly coloured.

Oystercatchers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Haematopodidae

The oystercatchers are large and noisy plover-like birds, with strong bills used for smashing or prising open molluscs.

Avocets and stilts[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Recurvirostridae

Recurvirostridae is a family of large wading birds, which includes the avocets and stilts.

Thick-knees[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Burhinidae

The thick-knees are a group of largely tropical waders in the family Burhinidae. Despite being classed as waders, most species have a preference for arid or semi-arid habitats.

Pratincoles and coursers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Glareolidae

Glareolidae is a family of wading birds comprising the pratincoles, which have short legs, long pointed wings and long forked tails, and the coursers, which have long legs, short wings and long, pointed bills which curve downwards.

Plovers and lapwings[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Charadriidae

The family Charadriidae includes the plovers, dotterels and lapwings. They are small to medium-sized birds with compact bodies, short, thick necks and long, usually pointed, wings.

Sandpipers and allies[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Scolopacidae

Scolopacidae is a large diverse family of small to medium-sized waders including the sandpipers, curlews, godwits, shanks, woodcocks, snipes, dowitchers and phalaropes. The majority of these species eat small invertebrates picked out of the mud or soil. Variation in length of legs and bills enables multiple species to feed in the same habitat, particularly on the coast, without direct competition for food.

Skuas[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Stercorariidae

The family Stercorariidae are, in general, medium to large birds, typically with grey or brown plumage, often with white markings on the wings.

Gulls[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Laridae

Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds, the gulls and kittiwakes.

Terns[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Sternidae

Terns are a group of generally medium to large seabirds typically with grey or white plumage, often with black markings on the head.

Skimmers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Rynchopidae

Skimmers are a small family of tropical tern-like birds.

Auks[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Alcidae

Auks live on the open sea, only deliberately coming ashore to nest.

Sandgrouse[edit]

Order: Pterocliformes   Family: Pteroclididae

Sandgrouse have small, pigeon like heads and necks, but sturdy compact bodies.

Pigeons and doves[edit]

Order: Columbiformes   Family: Columbidae

Pigeons and doves are stout-bodied birds with short necks and short slender bills with a fleshy cere.

Parrots[edit]

Order: Psittaciformes   Family: Psittacidae

Parrots are small to large birds with a characteristic curved beak shape.

Cuckoos[edit]

Order: Cuculiformes   Family: Cuculidae

The cuckoos are birds are of variable size with slender bodies, long tails and strong legs.

Barn owls[edit]

Order: Strigiformes   Family: Tytonidae

Barn owls are medium to large owls with large heads and characteristic heart-shaped faces.

Typical owls[edit]

Order: Strigiformes   Family: Strigidae

The typical owls are small to large solitary nocturnal birds of prey.

Nightjars[edit]

Order: Caprimulgiformes   Family: Caprimulgidae

Nightjars are medium-sized nocturnal birds with long wings, short legs and very short bills.

Swifts[edit]

Order: Apodiformes   Family: Apodidae

Swifts are small birds which spend the majority of their lives flying.

Kingfishers[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Alcedinidae

Kingfishers are medium-sized birds with large heads, long, pointed bills, short legs and stubby tails.

Bee-eaters[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Meropidae

The bee-eaters are a group of near passerine birds in the family Meropidae.

Rollers[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Coraciidae

Rollers resemble crows in size and build, but are more closely related to the kingfishers and bee-eaters.

Hoopoes[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Upupidae

Hoopoes have black, white and orangey-pink colouring with a large erectile crest on their head.

Woodpeckers and allies[edit]

Order: Piciformes   Family: Picidae

Woodpeckers are small to medium-sized birds with chisel-like beaks, short legs, stiff tails and long tongues.

Larks[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Alaudidae

Larks are small terrestrial birds, mostly fairly dull in appearance.

Swallows and martins[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Hirundinidae

The Hirundinidae family is a group of passerines adapted to aerial feeding.

Wagtails and pipits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Motacillidae

The Motacillidae is a family of small passerine birds with medium to long tails. They include the wagtails and pipits.

Bulbuls[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Pycnonotidae

Bulbuls are medium-sized songbirds.

Dippers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cinclidae

Dippers are a group of perching birds which specialise in feeding in running water.

Wrens[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Troglodytidae

The wrens have short wings and thin down-turned bills.

  • Wren, Troglodytes troglodytes

Accentors[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Prunellidae

The accentors are in the only bird family which is completely endemic to the Palearctic.

Thrushes and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Turdidae

Cisticolas and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cisticolidae

The Cisticolidae are warblers found mainly in warmer regions of the Old World.

Streaked scrub warbler[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Scotocercidae

Cettid warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cettiidae

Grassbirds and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Locustellidae

Reed warblers and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Acrocephalidae

Leaf warblers and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Phylloscopidae

Old World warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Sylviidae

The family Sylviidae is a group of small insectivorous passerine birds.

Kinglets[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Regulidae

The kinglets, also called crests, are a small group of birds often included in the Old World warblers, but frequently given family status.

Old World flycatchers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Muscicapidae

Old World flycatchers are a group of small passerine birds native to the Old World. There 274 species worldwide, of which 5 species occur in Morocco.

Bearded reedling[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Panuridae

Babblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Timaliidae

The babblers, or timaliids, are somewhat diverse in size and colouration, but are characterised by soft fluffy plumage.

Long-tailed tits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Aegithalidae

Long-tailed tits are a group of small passerine birds with medium to long tails.

Tits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Paridae

The Paridae are mainly small stocky woodland species with short stout bills.

Nuthatches[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Sittidae

Nuthatches are small woodland birds.

Wallcreeper[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Tichodromidae

The wallcreeper is a small bird, with crimson, grey and black plumage, related to the nuthatches.

Treecreepers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Certhiidae

Treecreepers are small woodland birds, brown above and white below.

Penduline tits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Remizidae

The penduline tits are a group of small passerine birds related to the true tits.

Old World orioles[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Oriolidae

The Old World orioles are colourful passerine birds, not related to the New World orioles.

Bushshrikes[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Malaconotidae

Bushshrikes are similar in habits to shrikes, hunting insects and other small prey from a perch on a bush.

Shrikes[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Laniidae

Shrikes are passerine birds known for their habit of catching other birds and small animals and impaling the uneaten portions on thorns.

Crows, ravens, jays and magpies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Corvidae

Corvidae includes crows, ravens, jays, choughs and magpies.

Starlings[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Sturnidae

Starlings are small to medium-sized passerine birds.

Sparrows[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Passeridae

Sparrows are small passerine birds.

Waxbills[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Estrildidae

The estrildid finches are small passerine birds of the Old World tropics and Australasia.

Vireos[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Vireonidae

The vireos are a group of small to medium-sized passerine birds mostly restricted to the New World.

Finches[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Fringillidae

Finches are seed-eating passerine birds.

Snow buntings and longspurs[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Calcariidae

Buntings[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Emberizidae

The buntings are a large family of passerine birds.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]