List of candidates in the United States presidential election, 2004

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The following are lists of candidates in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. Candidates who were not on any state ballots, withdrew from the race, suspended their presidential campaign, or failed to earn their party's nomination are listed separately.

Party nominees[edit]

All candidates in the table below were on the ballot in multiple states. Those who were on the ballot in enough states to win a majority in the U.S. Electoral College are marked in bold. Candidates who were on the ballot in no more than one state are listed in the next section.

Presidential candidate Running mate Party
Gene Amondson Leroy Pletten Prohibition
Michael Badnarik Richard Campagna Libertarian
Walt Brown Mary Alice Herbert Socialist
George W. Bush (winner) Richard Cheney Republican
Róger Calero Arrin Hawkins Socialist Workers
David Cobb Pat LaMarche Green
Earl F. Dodge Howard Lydick Prohibition
John Kerry John Edwards Democratic
Ralph Nader Peter Camejo Independent, Reform
John Parker Teresa Gutierrez Workers World
Michael Peroutka Chuck Baldwin Constitution
Bill Van Auken Jim Lawrence Socialist Equality

Ballot access[edit]

The two major parties in the United States are the Democratic and the Republican parties which are on the ballot in all fifty States and the District of Columbia.

The table below shows which third-party candidates were able to gain ballot access in each State. In some States, these candidates were on the ballot as independents, or on the ballot lines of different parties (for example, in Michigan the Socialist Party USA candidate received the Natural Law Party's ballot line.)

The Socialist Workers Party's official ticket could not be listed on the ballot in some states because Calero and Hawkins were both ineligible to be President, as Calero was not a native-born citizen and Hawkins was too young. In such states the party used their 2000 ticket of James Harris and Margaret Trowe (JH).

The Prohibition Party suffered a schism in 2003. Long-time Presidential candidate Earl Dodge was the nominee of one faction, while Gene Amondson was the nominee of the other. Both factions were on the ballot in Colorado, with only Amondson on the ballot in Louisiana.

Candidates who had enough potential electoral votes to win the presidency
  Electoral Votes Libertarian (Badnarik) Green (Cobb) Nader Constitution (Peroutka)
States 51 49 (50) 25 (43) 35 (48) 34 (42)
Electoral votes (EV) 538 527 (531) 267 (479) 278 (507) 341 (430)
Percent of EV 100% 97.9% (98.7%) 49.6% (89%) 51.7% (94.2%) 63.3% (79.9%)
Alabama 9   (write-in)   (write-in)
Alaska 3       (write-in)
Arizona 10   (write-in) (write-in)
Arkansas 6        
California 55     (write-in)  
Colorado 9        
Connecticut 7        
Delaware 3        
Florida 27        
Georgia 15   (write-in) (write-in) (write-in)
Hawaii 4    
Idaho 4   (write-in) (write-in)  
Illinois 21   (write-in) (write-in) (write-in)
Indiana 11   (write-in) (write-in)
Iowa 7        
Kansas 6   (write-in)    
Kentucky 8      
Louisiana 9        
Maine 4      
Maryland 10        
Massachusetts 12   (write-in)
Michigan 17        
Minnesota 10        
Mississippi 6        
Missouri 11   (write-in)  
Montana 3        
Nebraska 5        
Nevada 5        
New Hampshire 4 (write-in) (write-in)   (write-in)
New Jersey 15        
New Mexico 5        
New York 31   (write-in)  
North Carolina 15   (write-in) (write-in)
North Dakota 3      
Ohio 20   (write-in)  
Oklahoma 7
Oregon 7     (write-in)  
Pennsylvania 21     (write-in)  
Rhode Island 4        
South Carolina 8        
South Dakota 3      
Tennessee 11   (write-in)    
Texas 34   (write-in) (write-in) (write-in)
Utah 5   (write-in)    
Vermont 3   (write-in)   (write-in)
Virginia 13   (write-in) (write-in)  
Washington 11        
West Virginia 5   (write-in)  
Wisconsin 10       (write-in)
Wyoming 3   (write-in)    
District of Columbia 3   (write-in)  
Other third party candidates
  Electoral Votes Prohibition (Amondson) Socialist (Brown) Socialist Workers (Calero) Workers World (Parker) Socialist Equality (Van Auken)
States 51 2 8 (19) 14 (17) 3 (4) 5 (8)
EV 538 18 98 (218) 151 (247) 18 (73) 52 (93)
Percent of EV 100% 3.3% 18.2% (40.5%) 28% (45.9%) 3.3% (13.6%) 9.6% (17.3%)
Alabama 9
Alaska 3
Arizona 10
Arkansas 6
California 55 (write-in) (write-in)
Colorado 9 (also Dodge)   (JH)  
Connecticut 7
Delaware 3  
Florida 27   (JH)
Georgia 15
Hawaii 4
Idaho 4 (write-in)
Illinois 21 (write-in)
Indiana 11 (write-in)
Iowa 7 (JH)  
Kansas 6 (write-in) (write-in)
Kentucky 8 (write-in)
Louisiana 9     (JH)
Maine 4 (write-in)
Maryland 10
Massachusetts 12
Michigan 17  
Minnesota 10 (write-in)  
Mississippi 6 (JH)
Missouri 11
Montana 3 (write-in)
Nebraska 5  
Nevada 5
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey 15      
New Mexico 5
New York 31   (write-in)
North Carolina 15 (write-in)
North Dakota 3
Ohio 20 (write-in)
Oklahoma 7
Oregon 7
Pennsylvania 21
Rhode Island 4  
South Carolina 8  
South Dakota 3
Tennessee 11 (write-in)
Texas 34 (write-in)
Utah 5 (write-in) (JH)
Vermont 3    
Virginia 13 (write-in)
Washington 11 (JH)    
West Virginia 5
Wisconsin 10   (JH)
Wyoming 3
District of Columbia 3 (JH)
Other candidates

The tickets below were on the ballot in no more than one state. Those who appeared on a single state's ballot are in bold, all others were write-in candidates. Those without party labels were independents. Some did not have vice-presidential candidates.

  • A. J. Albritton (American Republican Party—Mississippi)
  • Sterling Allan (Providential Party—Utah)
  • Stanford E. "Andy" Andress/Irene M. Deasy (Colorado)
  • Lawson M. Bone (Tennessee)
  • Kenneth M. Bonnell (Mississippi)
  • Robert A. Boyle II (Maryland)
  • Harry Braun (Arizona)
  • Theodis "Ted" Brown, Sr. (Missouri)
  • Michael Massa/Ned Stanley(Chaminade Party-Missouri)
  • Fred Cook (Georgia)
  • Eric J. Davis (Michigan)
  • Robert DiGiulio (Children's Party—Vermont)
  • Bob Dorn (Washington)
  • Lonnie D. Frank (California)
  • Ronald "John Galt Jr." Gascon (Pennsylvania)
  • Jack Grimes (United Fascist Union—Pennsylvania)
  • Michael Halpin (New York)
  • Thomas Harens/Jennifer Ryan (Christian Freedom Party—Minnesota)
  • Larry D. Hines (Texas)
  • Georgia Hough (Georgia)
  • Charles Jay/Marilyn Chambers (Personal Choice—Utah)
  • Keith Judd (Massachusetts)
  • Darren E. Karr (Party X—Oregon)
  • Samuel Keegan (Rhode Island)
  • John Joseph Kennedy (Georgia)
  • Tom Laughlin
  • Joseph Martyniuk Jr. (Illinois)
  • David Mevis (Mississippi)
  • Muadin (E-Democratic Party—Massachusetts)
  • Leonard Peltier/Janice Jordan (Peace and Freedom—California)
  • Jeffrey Peters (We the People Party—New Hampshire)
  • Andrew M. Rotramel (Texas)
  • Joseph "Average Joe" Schriner (Ohio)
  • Dennis P. Slatton (United America Party—North Carolina)
  • Dan Snow (Texas)
  • Brian B. Springfield (Virginia)
  • Diane Templin (American Party—California)
  • Lawrence Rey Topham (Utah)
  • Lemuel Tucker (Michigan)
  • Da Vid (Light Party—California)
  • Tom Wells (Family Values Party—Florida)
  • A. J. Wildman (Virginia)

Although Guam has no votes in the Electoral College, they have held a straw poll for their presidential preferences since 1980. In 2004, the results were Bush 21,490 (64.1%), Kerry 11,781 (35.1%), Nader 196 (0.58%) and Badnarik 67 (0.2%).[1]

Primary and convention candidates[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2004 Presidential Vote". Ballot-Access.org. 2004-12-12. Retrieved 2008-09-17. 

External links[edit]