List of charges in United States v. Manning

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United States v. Manning is the court-martial case involving United States Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (now known as Chelsea Manning), who delivered U.S. government documents to those not entitled to receive them in 2009 and 2010. Media reports alleged that the receiver was Julian Assange of WikiLeaks. Manning was arrested in May 2010[1] and the court-martial on the charges was held in June–August 2013. The charges were related to events which occurred "at or near" Contingency Operating Station Hammer, Iraq, in 2009 and 2010.

Charges[edit]

Listed by alleged code violation[edit]

The charges can be broken down as follows:

  • UCMJ 104 (Aiding the enemy): 1 count. This charge carries a potential death penalty.
  • UCMJ 92 (Failure to obey a lawful order or regulation): 9 counts. Mostly related to computers.[2][3]
    • Army Regulation 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(3): Modifying or installing unauthorized software to a system, using it for 'unintended' purposes.
    • Army Regulation 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(4): Circumventing security mechanisms
    • Army Regulation 25-2, para. 4-6(k): Forbids transferring classified or sensitive information to non-secure systems
    • Army Regulation 380-5: Improper storage of classified information

Total number of counts: 34

Listed by document[edit]

Most of Manning's charges are directly related to the alleged transferral of a specific document to another party. These documents are as follows:

The media has alleged that many of these documents are the same as documents published by Wikileaks, including:

Listed in the order given on the charge sheets[edit]

First set of charges (2010)[edit]

The first set of charges came on July 5, 2010. The Specifications (Spec.) are listed below in the same order as they are listed on the charge sheets. To the right of each specification is a description of the related documents or actions.[10]

Charge 1: Violation of UCMJ Article 92 (Failure to obey a lawful order or regulation)[edit]
  • Spec. 1: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-6(k): The 2007 July 12 Baghdad video
  • Spec. 2: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-6(k): 50 classified US Dept of State cables
  • Spec. 3: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-6(k): A classified Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation
  • Spec. 4: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(3): Adding unauthorized software to SIPRNet
Charge 2: Violation of UCMJ Article 134 (General article)[edit]

Second set of charges (2011)[edit]

The second set of charges came on March 1, 2011, and are as follows:[11]

Additional Charge 1: Violation of UCMJ Article 104 (Aiding the enemy)[edit]
  • Spec. 1: Knowingly giving intelligence to the enemy through indirect means
Additional Charge 2: Violation of UCMJ Article 134 (General article)[edit]
Additional Charge 3: Violation of UCMJ Article 92 (Failure to obey a lawful order or regulation)[edit]
  • Spec. 1: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(4): Bypassing security mechanisms
  • Spec. 2: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(3): Adding unauthorized software to a SIPRNet computer
  • Spec. 3: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(3): Adding unauthorized software to a SIPRNet computer
  • Spec. 4: Army Reg. 25-2, para. 4-5(a)(3): Using an information system for other than its intended purpose
  • Spec. 5: Army Reg. 380-5, para. 7-4: Wrongfully storing classified information

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Hague Academic Coalition, DomCLIC Project (2011). "The United States Army v Bradley Manning". Retrieved 2011-04-13. [dead link]
  2. ^ US Army (2000). "Army Regulation 308-5". Retrieved 2011-04-13. 
  3. ^ US Army (2009). "Army Regulation 2-25". Retrieved 2011-04-13. 
  4. ^ Harold Edgar & Benno C. Schmidt, Jr. (1973). "The Espionage Statutes and Publication of Defense Information". 73 Columbia Law Review 929, 940. Retrieved 2011-04-11.  from the Federation of American Scientists website
  5. ^ Jennifer K. Elsea (2010-01-10). "Criminal Prohibitions on the Publication of Classified Defense Information". Retrieved 2011-04-13.  from the Federation of American Scientists website
  6. ^ US DOJ, Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section , Scott Eltringham, ed. (Feb 2007). "Prosecuting Computer Crimes". Retrieved 2011-04-16.  Chapter 1, Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, pg 14
  7. ^ a b How Manning Stole The Cables by Nick Dubaz on November 30, 2010, conflicthealth.com (website of Christopher Albon) retr Sep 2011
  8. ^ A Narrative Chronology of Bradley Manning’s Alleged Leaks, March 5, 2011, Marcy Wheeler
  9. ^ Video Captures Bradley Manning With Hacker Pals at Time of First Leaks Kim Zetter, Wired.com, May 20, 2011
  10. ^ US Army HHC, 2d BCT, 10th MTN Div (LI) (2010-07-05). "Charge Sheet of Bradley E. Manning". Cryptome. Retrieved 2011-12-23. 
  11. ^ US Army, MDW, OSJA, HQ CMD BN, USA (2011-03-01). "Charge Sheet of Bradley E. Manning (Additional)". Cryptome. Retrieved 2011-12-23. 

External links[edit]