List of charities accused of ties to terrorism

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During the "war on terror" the names of charities accused of ties to terrorism have been published. Some detainees have been captured largely because they volunteered or worked for these charities.

On August 23, 2007 the Bush Administration announced plans to implement enhanced security checking of the employees of American charities, which receive funds from U.S. Agency for International Development, looking for those who might have ties to terrorism.[1] Charities which are turned down will not be offered an explanation, or an avenue to appeal the decisions.

Charities accused of ties to terrorism[edit]

Name Headquarters Accusers Alleged Ties
Afghan Support Committee[2][3] Pakistan U.S. State Department
  • Alleged to have funneled support to fighters in Afghanistan.
Al-Haramain Foundation[4] Saudi Arabia U.S. State Department
Al Kifah Refugee Center[3] United States Spanish police
Al Wafa al Igatha al Islamia[4] Afghanistan U.S. State Department
Benevolence International Foundation United States Federal Bureau of Investigation
Bosanska Idealna Futura Bosnia Federal Bureau of Investigation
Global Relief Foundation United States Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Bosnian offices shut down on US request in 2002
  • Commission of the European Union froze assets in 2006[6]
Health and Education Project International[7] Canada Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development[8][9] United States United States
  • On November 10, 2004, convicted by US federal court of funding Hamas, and liable for damages in teen's death.
Human Appeal International[10] United Kingdom U.S. State Department
  • employed Guantanamo detainee Boudella el Hajj - now cleared of all wrongdoing, American authorities have admitted that he was wrongly detained for over 6 years, and has been released.
Human Concern International[11] Canada U.S. military
International Islamic Relief Organization[3] Saudi Arabia U.S. State Department
  • being sued by families of the victims of the September 11 attacks
Interpal[12] United Kingdom

United States Treasury Department

Internationale Humanitäre Hilfsorganisation e.V.[16][17] Germany German Interior Ministry
  • Outlawed in Germany since it has financially supported Hamas, while presenting activities to donors as humanitarian help.[17]
Jamaat al Dawa al Quran[18] Afghanistan JTF-GTMO
  • American counter-terrorism analysts at Guantanamo assert this group is an extremist militant group.
Jamat al Tabligh[19] Pakistan U.S. State Department
  • "The Jamat al Tabligh, a Pakistani-based Islamic Missionary organization, is being used as a cover to mask travel and activities of terrorists including members of al-Qaeda"
Maktab al-Khidamat[20] Afghanistan U.S. 9-11 commission
Muslim Aid[3] London Spanish police,[21] Israel,[22] Government of Bangladesh[23][24][25]
Society of the Revival of Islamic Heritage[26] Kuwait U.S. State Department
Sanabal Charitable Committee[26] United Kingdom
Tamils Rehabilitation Organisation(TRO)[27] Canada FBI

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walter Pincus (August 23, 2007). "Foreign Aid Groups Face Terror Screens". Washington Post. Retrieved 2007-08-23. 
  2. ^ a b Terrorist Exclusion List, US State Department, November 15, 2002
  3. ^ a b c d Spain charity terror link alleged, CNN, December 8, 2002
  4. ^ a b Dossier (.pdf) of Jamal Muhammad Alawi Mar'i, Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  5. ^ a b c d Complete 911 Timeline, Cooperative Research
  6. ^ Commission Regulation 76/2006
  7. ^ National Post Apologizes to Human Concern International, South Asia Partnership Canada
  8. ^ Charities Held Liable in Teen Death, Wildman Harrold Attorneys and Counselors
  9. ^ Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, NY Times
  10. ^ Dossier (.pdf) of Boudella el Hajj, Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  11. ^ Burnett, et al. v. al Baraka Investment and Development Corp., et al., Jan. 18, 2005, Findlaw
  12. ^ "U.S. Designates Five Charities Funding Hamas and Six Senior Hamas Leaders as Terrorist Entities", United States Department of the Treasury, August 22, 2003.
  13. ^ Matthew Levitt, Dennis Ross, Hamas: Politics, Charity, And Terrorism in the Service of Jihad, Yale University Press, 2007, p. 158, ISBN 0300122586, 9780300122589
  14. ^ Dominic Casciani, Islamic charity cleared of Hamas link, BBC, 24 September 2003.
  15. ^ Niki May Young (27 July 2010). "Interpal wins High Court case against Sunday Express claims of terror links". Civil Society Media. Retrieved 19 August 2010. 
  16. ^ Germany outlaws IHH over claimed Hamas links, Haaretz 12.07.10
  17. ^ a b Germany bans group accused of Hamas links, Ynet 07.12.10
  18. ^ Summarized transcripts (.pdf), from Sahib Rohullah Wakil's Combatant Status Review Tribunal - pages 16-25
  19. ^ Combatant Status Review Board Letters, final release (.pdf), Department of Defense Freedom of Information Office -- see page 4 of the .pdf
  20. ^ National Commission on Terrorist Attack Upon the United States: appendix a common abbreviations, 911 Commission
  21. ^ http://edition.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/europe/12/08/spain.alqaeda/
  22. ^ http://www.mfa.gov.il/mfa/pressroom/2008/pages/defense%20minister%20signs%20order%20banning%20hamas-affiliated%20charitable%20organizations%207-jul-2008.aspx
  23. ^ http://archive.thedailystar.net/newDesign/news-details.php?nid=80287
  24. ^ http://www.dhakatribune.com/politics/2014/apr/06/hasina-no-vote-rigging-al-backed-candidates
  25. ^ http://www.dhakatribune.com/law-amp-rights/2013/aug/21/government-mulls-banning-10-islamist-outfits
  26. ^ a b c Summary of Evidence (.pdf) from pages 25-26 of Mohammed Fenaitel Mohamed Al Daihani's Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  27. ^ 'Charities' back terror, Ottawa Sun