List of World Chess Championships

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The following is a list of World Chess Championships including the hosting cities. Qualification path consist of Interzonals (defunct), FIDE Grand Prix, Chess World Cup and Candidates Tournament for the process of selecting a challenger for championship matches.

List of World Chess Championships[edit]

Year Host and venue World Champion Runner-up(s) Won (+) Lost (−) Draw (=) Format
Unofficial World Chess Championships (1834–66)
1834 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland London France Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Alexander McDonnell 45 28 13
1843 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland London France Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Howard Staunton 3 2 1
1843 France Paris United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Howard Staunton France Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant 11 6 4
1846 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Howard Staunton United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Bernhard Horwitz 14 7 3
1858 France Paris United States Paul Morphy Kingdom of Prussia Adolf Anderssen 7 2 2
1866 United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland London Austrian Empire Wilhelm Steinitz Kingdom of Prussia Adolf Anderssen 8 6 0
Official World Chess Championships (1886–1937)
1886 United States New York, Saint Louis, New Orleans Austria-Hungary Wilhelm Steinitz United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Johannes Zukertort 10 5 5 first-to-10 wins
1889 Cuba Havana United States Wilhelm Steinitz Russian Empire Mikhail Chigorin 10 6 1 best-of-20 + tiebreak
1891 United States New York United States Wilhelm Steinitz Austria-Hungary Isidor Gunsberg 6 4 9
1892 Cuba Havana United States Wilhelm Steinitz Russian Empire Mikhail Chigorin 8+2 8 4+1
1894 United States New York, Philadelphia, and Canada Montreal German Empire Emanuel Lasker United States Wilhelm Steinitz 10 5 4 first-to-10 wins
1897 Russian Empire Moscow German Empire Emanuel Lasker United States Wilhelm Steinitz 10 2 5
1907 United States 6 cities[nb 1] of the United States German Empire Emanuel Lasker United States Frank Marshall 8 0 7 first-to-8 wins
1908 German Empire Düsseldorf, Munich German Empire Emanuel Lasker German Empire Siegbert Tarrasch 8 3 5
1910 Austria-Hungary Vienna and German Empire Berlin German Empire Emanuel Lasker Austria-Hungary Carl Schlechter 1 1 8 best of 10; disputed whether challenger had to win by 1 or 2 points;[1][2]
1910 German Empire Berlin German Empire Emanuel Lasker France David Janowski 8 0 3 first-to-8 wins
1921 Cuba Havana Cuba José Raúl Capablanca Weimar Republic Emanuel Lasker 4 0 10 best-of-24;[1] Emanuel Lasker resigned after 14 games
1927 Argentina Buenos Aires France Alexander Alekhine Cuba José Raúl Capablanca 6 3 25 first-to-6 wins
1929 Weimar Republic Wiesbaden, Heidelberg, Berlin, and Netherlands The Hague France Alexander Alekhine Weimar Republic Efim Bogoljubov 11 5 9 first-to-6 wins AND 15 points
1934 Nazi Germany 10 cities[nb 2] of Nazi Germany France Alexander Alekhine Nazi Germany Efim Bogoljubov 8 3 15
1935 Netherlands 13 cities[nb 3] of the Netherlands Netherlands Max Euwe France Alexander Alekhine 9 8 13
1937 Netherlands 7 cities[nb 4] of the Netherlands France Alexander Alekhine Netherlands Max Euwe 10 4 11
FIDE World Chess Championships (1948–90)
1948 Netherlands The Hague and Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik 4 players 14 points out of 20 5-player, 5-cycle round-robin tournament
1951 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik Soviet Union David Bronstein 5 5 14 best-of-24[1]
1954 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik Soviet Union Vasily Smyslov 7 7 10
1957 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Vasily Smyslov Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik 6 3 13
1958 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik Soviet Union Vasily Smyslov 7 5 11
1960 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Tal Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik 6 2 13
1961 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik Soviet Union Mikhail Tal 10 5 6
1963 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Tigran Petrosian Soviet Union Mikhail Botvinnik 5 2 15
1966 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Tigran Petrosian Soviet Union Boris Spassky 4 3 17
1969 Soviet Union Moscow Soviet Union Boris Spassky Soviet Union Tigran Petrosian 6 4 13
1972 Iceland Laugardalshöll, Reykjavík United States Bobby Fischer Soviet Union Boris Spassky 7 3 11
1975 Philippines Manila Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov United States Bobby Fischer by default first-to-10 wins
1978 Philippines Baguio Convention Center, Baguio Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov  Viktor Korchnoi 6 5 21 first-to-6 wins
1981 Italy Kurhaus, Merano Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov Switzerland Viktor Korchnoi 6 2 10
1984 Soviet Union Pillar Hall of the House of the Unions, Moscow Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov Soviet Union Garry Kasparov 5 3 40 first-to-6 wins; aborted match
1985 Soviet Union Tchaikovsky Concert Hall, Moscow Soviet Union Garry Kasparov Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov 5 3 16 best-of-24[1]
1986 United Kingdom Park Lane Hotel, London, and Soviet Union Leningrad Concert Hall, Leningrad[3] Soviet Union Garry Kasparov Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov 5 4 15
1987 Spain Lope de Vega Theatre, Seville Soviet Union Garry Kasparov Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov 4 4 16
1990 United States Hudson Theatre, New York City, and France Palais des Congrès, Lyon Soviet Union Garry Kasparov Soviet Union Anatoly Karpov 4 3 17
Classical World Chess Championships (1993–2005)
World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov and challenger Nigel Short split from FIDE, the official world governing body of chess, and played their title match under the auspices of the Professional Chess Association.
1993 United Kingdom Savoy Theatre, London Russia Garry Kasparov England Nigel Short 6 1 13 best-of-24[1]
1995 United States World Trade Center, New York City Russia Garry Kasparov India Viswanathan Anand 4 1 13 best-of-20[1]
2000 United Kingdom Riverside Studios, London Russia Vladimir Kramnik Russia Garry Kasparov 2 0 13 best-of-16[1]
2004 Switzerland Centro Dannemann, Brissago Russia Vladimir Kramnik Hungary Peter Leko 2 2 10 best-of-14[1]
FIDE World Chess Championships (1993–2005)
Garry Kasparov was stripped of his FIDE-title after he and challenger Nigel Short split from FIDE in 1993. Anatoly Karpov, in 1990 participant in the last FIDE World Chess Championship match, was announced as incumbent World Champion.

In 1996 FIDE changed its rule and the incumbent World Champion was not anymore automatically qualified for the Final match.

1993 Netherlands Zwolle, Arnhem, Amsterdam, and Indonesia Jakarta Russia Anatoly Karpov Netherlands Jan Timman 6 2 13 best-of-24[1]
1996 Russia Elista Russia Anatoly Karpov United States Gata Kamsky 6 3 9 best-of-20[1]
1998 Netherlands Groningen, and Switzerland Lausanne Russia Anatoly Karpov India Viswanathan Anand 2+2 2 2 single-elimination tournament with finals best-of-6 + tiebreaks
1999 United States Las Vegas Russia Alexander Khalifman Armenia Vladimir Akopian 2 1 3
2000 India New Delhi and Iran Tehran India Viswanathan Anand Spain Alexei Shirov 3 0 1
2002 Russia Moscow Ukraine Ruslan Ponomariov Ukraine Vassily Ivanchuk 2 0 5
2004 Libya Tripoli Uzbekistan Rustam Kasimdzhanov England Michael Adams 3 2 3
2005 Argentina Potrero de los Funes, San Luis Bulgaria Veselin Topalov 7 players 10 points out of 14 8-player double round-robin tournament
World Chess Championships (2006–present)
2006 Russia Government House,[4] Elista Russia Vladimir Kramnik Bulgaria Veselin Topalov 3+2 3+1 6+1 best-of-12 + tiebreaks
2007 Mexico Hotel Sheraton Centro Histórico, Mexico City India Viswanathan Anand 7 players 9 points out of 14 8-player double round-robin tournament
2008 Germany Bundeskunsthalle, Bonn India Viswanathan Anand Russia Vladimir Kramnik 3 1 7 best-of-12 + tiebreaks
2010 Bulgaria Central Military Club, Sofia India Viswanathan Anand Bulgaria Veselin Topalov 3 2 7
2012 Russia Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow India Viswanathan Anand Israel Boris Gelfand 1+1 1 10+3
2013 India Hyatt Regency Chennai, Chennai[5] Norway Magnus Carlsen India Viswanathan Anand 3 0 7
2014 Russia Sochi 5–25 November[6]
2016 TBD

Related matches[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j in case of a draw the World Championship title defender keeps holding his title
  2. ^ One chess historian, David Vincent Hooper, contended in Chess magazine, March 1976, pp. 183–84, that this match was not for the world championship. Edward Winter, Who Was R.J. Buckley?, retrieved 2012-02-04.
  3. ^ Schmemann, Serge (5 October 1986). "Kasparov Makes A Key Move, And He Fans Sense A Victory". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ Kirsan Ilyumzhinov : Kramnik and Topalov come to Elista on same flight
  5. ^ "Five-star venue for Anand-Carlsen tie". The Times of India. 28 May 2013. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  6. ^ "FIDE Announces Dates for World Chess Championship Cycles". Fide.com. 2012-03-28. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  7. ^ "FIDE Championship (1928) by Edward Winter". Chesshistory.com. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  8. ^ "World Chess Championship : 1992 Fischer - Spassky Rematch". Mark-weeks.com. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Davidson, Henry A. (1949, 1981). A Short History of Chess. McKay. ISBN 0-679-14550-8.
  • Barcza, Alföldy, Kapu: Die Weltmeister des Schachspiels. Hamburg 1975
  • Jens Enevoldsen: Verdens bedste Skak, Politiken (Denmark) 1966